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European Trapshooting champion (photo)

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Custer, Oct 15, 2007.

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  1. Custer

    Custer Member

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    This is Ian Mullarkey the European champ, I have also been looking at the gun mount of the top Italian shooters, they all seem to have there head well forward and gunbutt well down in the shoulder, I guess head up and butt up is not always the way to go.
    Custer
     
  2. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Ian shot the SW Grand and broke one of the the two 200's in his first ATA shoot. He, and all the GB shooters, bear right down on the stock, as does, by the way, Eric Munson. They look like they are aiming like blazes but told me they all - the Brits, that is - just focus on the bird, all of them, they say.

    Neil
     
  3. buzzgun

    buzzgun Member

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    It seems like every photo of a good international style shooter shows this form.


    I've tried it for periods, & it seems to be as good as anything, but I just can't keep doing it. I guess if I was starting over, I'd probably learn that way.
     
  4. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Jack, he's a DTL shooter, not International. DTL targets are a little wider (straightaway from 1 & 5) but otherwise similar to ours. Two shots and all that.

    In 2006 he was second in the British Championships, this year first in Europe. I doubt that 200 was luck.

    He and his friend Paul S. met with the EC in San Antonio to help us write fair rules for classifying DTL shooters based on their averages, a question which had bedeviled us for years. We ended up doing it the way they suggested.

    Neil
     
  5. Stubbie

    Stubbie TS Member

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    Neil I am interested in knowing what the ATA has done to establish an ATA class by the use of DTL averages as you suggest in this post. As you may know that we here in Australia shoot DTL also. I have shot the Grand American 1995,96,98,&99 and always had a hard time getting enough targets to avoid penalty class in events.

    This may be a great move to make it easier for Aussie shooters to get a class and so may be more will come to compete. May be it is the fact that the President of the ATA is a man of the shooters(by the way I would like to offer my belated congratulations)

    Stubbie aka John Holder
     
  6. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

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    Stubbie, the problem has always been the two shots. A number of DTL shooters have asserted, in writing, (essentially) that only first barrel hit's should be counted, since that's all they get here. For example, a 96 with four second-barrel kills is just a 92.

    I did some checking and found that the DTL score (let's say that 96 - the total score with no "first-barrel-discount") was a very good predictor of what was going to be shot at the Grand by that shooter. Of six examined, three were right on target, two above and one below, but never by much. In other words, and this was supported by the two cited individuals, we just use the DTL averages and end up putting them where they belong.

    Target requirement are reduced from 2000 to 1000 now and that should help. This year the bump is two classes, but by next year I might get that down to one.

    I've another idea as well, but don't want to say anything 'til I get the EC's reaction. If it looks promising I'll get hold of you directly.

    Thank for the congratulations,

    Neil
     
  7. berettaman7

    berettaman7 TS Member

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    I guess the stance has to do with the fact that many European shooters are bunker trap shooters where the forward stance is most common.

    Berettaman7
     
  8. Stubbie

    Stubbie TS Member

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    Neil: Thank you for the info glad to see the reduced target requirement also the measured approach to more improvements, would be glad to hear your ideas when you have run them past your EC. Keep up the good work it seems to me that your year as head honco will be one of great improvements to the ATA.

    Stubbie
     
  9. webley

    webley TS Member

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    Berettaman7,

    Just about all mainland European trapshooters shoot Olympic Trap (OT) or the similar Universal Trap (UT) as you suggest - but relatively few British Trapshooters shoot OT or UT. The normal British trap game is DTL (like your ATA targets as Neil has mentioned). The special demands of OT are not an influence on most British Trapshooters – especially when they are starting out & developing a style.

    What I find interesting is even though just about all trapshooters in the UK begin trapshooting by cut their teeth on targets similar to ATA singles (and perhaps rarely shoot anything else) - you’ll never see anyone adopting the very upright stance used in the US along with stocks having the considerable drop at heel which are frequently used in the US.

    The best explanation I’ve seen as to why there are two divergent styles for basically similar targets is contained in John Bridles book ‘Shotgun Shooting & Technology’ (out of print but available via the normal book search websites).

    Again as pointed out by Neil – Ian Mullarkey is almost exclusively a DTL shooter & from his published averages/scores doesn’t shoot OT/UT. Compared to what I’ve seen at clay shoots here in the UK over the last 25+ years the photo is a good illustration of how you’d see people shooting here (and also on the continent). Whilst Ian’s style has the stock placed in the shoulder perhaps slightly lower than average it’s still well within what would be considered ‘normal style’. How far the head is pushed forward along the comb depends on neck length as much as anything.

    The style is of course far more ‘recoil resistant’ than one requiring considerable drop at heel. It's a style which translates well to the faster trap disciplines where two very fast shots are required.

    Regards
    Russell
     
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