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Euro vs USD, Shotgun prices

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Jerseyshooter, Jul 9, 2010.

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  1. Jerseyshooter

    Jerseyshooter TS Member

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    The Euro was running at 1.51 to the dollar last year.....it is now 1.26....a 17% reduction. To my knowledge I have not seen a 17% reduction and prices on imports. When (or if) do you think this will impact the prices of our favorite top-end guns that are produced in the Euro-economic nations? I am thinking of Kreighoff and Perazzi primarily, but this would also impact Merkel, all the Spanish sxs makers, the other Italian makers and all the imports from Belgium with U.S. names.
     
  2. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

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    I'm certainly no international money expert, but my guess is that it would take about 15-18 months for the exchange rate to start to have a noticeable effect on the prices we pay in dollars for European guns. Of course, that only applies when the prices are coming DOWN in dollars. If the prices go UP in dollars, then that takes effect in about 60 days.

    Easystreet
     
  3. Bob Schultz

    Bob Schultz Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Most of the european manufacturers of guns and ammo are trying to walk a monetary tightrope. They hold their prices down when the euro goes way up so they don't kill their US market ... they also make a bit more when the eurodollar dips against the US dollar.

    Frankly, I would not want to have to do this. It must be pretty nerve racking to participate in the currency game.

    Bob
     
  4. Ted K.

    Ted K. Member

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    A lot of European manufacturers with significant sales to U.S markets (particularly automobile manufacturers) try to hedge their exposure to currency fluctuations. The result of this is that prices don't go up in linear relation to currency movements, and they don't go down that way either.


    If you buy directly from a seller in Europe and pay in euros, you might see some benefit to the current decline in the value of the euro, but you can expect some transaction costs - credit card companies are now adding about 3% to charges in foreign currencies.

    Ted K.
     
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