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Ethics of modifying an old shotgun

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Porcupine, Mar 14, 2009.

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  1. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    I have a 1960-vintage Browning Broadway that I almost sold like an idiot. I'm past that crisis now and am considering adding an adjustable comb and butt plate. I have the original stock which doesn't fit me at all and an Anton stock which fits me very well, just not perfectly. I would have no reservations in sending out the Anton stock, but I'm wondering if I should keep the factory Broadway stock in factory configuration (and never use it) and send out the Anton stock for modification. Or, sell the Anton stock and use that money to modify the factory stock? This Broadway is a nice shotgun and so I wonder if I would be committing 'sacrilige' if I modified the factory stock? Thanks for your opinions.

    LA
     
  2. Jamesquinn

    Jamesquinn TS Member

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    It's your gun, so you can do whatever you like. If it were mine, I'd keep the original stock in original condition, and use whatever modified stock you like. You may like another stock better and shoot it better, but it will always be worth more with the original stock.

    That way there's no ethics question at all.
     
  3. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    The real question is do you ever want to be able to sell it for max dollars. If you do, keep the original pristeen. Logic would dictate that since the Anton stock is close to ideal for you,shoot with it and save the original.
     
  4. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Banned Supporting Vendor

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    There was a local guy here who had a beautiful original Winchester Model 21 Skeet gun and he had a friend of mine cut a comb into it. I was pissed when I seen it and went to my friends house who did the work and he told me that if I had ever told anyone what he did, he would kick my ass. True story.

    The guy also had an original Remington 32 Skeet gun in flawless condition that he did the same thing to. I wanted to kill him.

    If you want an adjustable comb on a colector gun, get another stock!
     
  5. racer

    racer TS Member

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    Tron is kidding right? I don't understand what you think these guns will be "worth" someday. Not to say it's not a nice gun Porcupine just that not every gun made will be a collector gun someday- Dan
     
  6. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Pegging this problem as an ethical one is like saying that it violates your morals.

    Guns have no ethics.
     
  7. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    ...and apparently, neither do Presbyterians! lol


    Seriously, although there's no "hard" ethics violation here, many do consider it a violation of "gentlemens' etiquette." By that code, we don't really "own" guns...we "lease them for a while" from the brotherhood.


    Remember, when you own a gun, what you really mean is - you own it, for the present time. In the long run, we're all dead, and would hopefully like to leave these pieces the way we found them, but for some well-earned user wear. When you experience the joy of one of these pieces coming your way, it's because there were likely multiple former owners who exercised some judgement and impulse-control during the time they owned it. I certainly appreciate that, when I get one, and don't intend to break the chain.


    You're not violating ethics by cutting these guns up...you're just being a perposterous ass, that's all.
     
  8. racer

    racer TS Member

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    I would cut up the Anton first if it will fit you the best. I wouldn't cut up a Henry or a Sharps- unless I needed better scores with them... ;) Dan
     
  9. 682b

    682b Member

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    I understand not cutting the original stock, I would have a hard time doing that. Just one thing to think about, depending on the Anton wood it could be quite valuable and rather scarce. Buy another factory used stock and cut it. Just my way of thinking. JIM
     
  10. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    buzz-gun: EXCELLENT post. Well put, and dead-on.
    -Gary
     
  11. GARMASTERS

    GARMASTERS TS Member

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    Ask yourself, "when I'm on my deathbed, what will I have wished I did?"
     
  12. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    if you wanted to modify a Holland & Holland or a Purdey...well that would put you in line for some scorn, but I wouldn't worry about your Broadway.
     
  13. mirage1

    mirage1 Member

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    I always get another stock when I want to modify stock dimensions.
    To my surprise when I am tired of the modified stock I always seem
    to get my money back. For me it is not just the value of the original
    stock it is keeping the gun original-it seems harder to find guns
    that are original today.

    Joe
     
  14. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Today there is little Collector value in a used Superposed trap gun They seem to fetch about $1500. If you have two stocks then cut the anton you can always sell the anton with a comb on it good luck if you want to sell the origional stock with an adj comb it will hurt it's value. I am surprised at how low a superposed will sell for they cost a fortune new and across the pond they sell for twice as much as here!

    Joe
     
  15. m70win

    m70win Member

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    May that poor old local guy rest in peace.

    Tim
     
  16. Bushmaster1313

    Bushmaster1313 Well-Known Member

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    I think of it more as whether or not you are destroying history.

    I am converting my 1940 Ithaca 37R into a trap gun by giving it a high comb stock and a more substantial forend. I am also having it reblued because the good honest wear to the finish on the receiver was unappealing.

    This gun is a first year of manufacture for the 37R, but there is not a lot of history in the worn out finish.

    On the other hand, the busted up stock and the excellent condition forend have spectacular hand checkering that is worth saving so that I and others in the future can see what hand checkering on a production gun was all about.

    For this reason any refinishing of the stock or forend will leave the checkering alone.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. over the hill

    over the hill Active Member

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    I view it as Restoration vs Alteration.

    If you have a very nice piece thats worth a good sum you might want to leave it alone.

    On the other hand if you were to attain a good piece, say a Parker that needs help, Del Greco is the man to send it to. It will come back as factory new.

    Just my opinions

    Regards....Gerald
     
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