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Effects of recoil reducers

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Simone, Dec 8, 2009.

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  1. Simone

    Simone TS Member

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    Thinking about putting a 14 oz. recoil reducer in the stock of my gun. Would having a “back-heavy” gun affect my swing to the target? Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. Hoosier Daddy

    Hoosier Daddy TS Member

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    Probably.
     
  3. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    No. Once you put the gun to your shoulder the weight will disappear.
     
  4. vpr80

    vpr80 Active Member

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    Is there a way to figure out how much to add? I have a field gun that I've been using at Clays and Skeet and would like a little more weight in the back, but don't know how much to add between 8 oz and 16 oz.
     
  5. WNCRob

    WNCRob Member

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    Many of the mercury and mechanical in-stock reducers are 7-8 ounces. I'd try that before I put almost a pound in my stock. OR, just add some shot and see what works.
     
  6. racer

    racer TS Member

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    I shot a model 12 and XT with 10-12 oz. of hard shot in the stock for many years. 16 oz fit in my XT until shortening stock a little. Pour the shot in and melt some wax in the hole. Never had problems- Dan
     
  7. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Add a pound or two and see for yourself!! Hap
     
  8. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Simone, yes.
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Simone- 14 oz is a lot. You can test your question by wrapping different amounts of shot in something and dropping it in your stock bolt hole. Shoot a few rounds with different weights. In fact, just putting shot wrapped in a cloth covered with tape might work as well as some reducers.

    If you want to get fancy, you could put shot in a tube with a spring behind it to hold the tube against the front of the hole. The spring will compress when the gun is shot.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Pat, careful I'd hate to see you end up in a copy rights dispute!
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    When adding weight you don't have to put it all in the butt. Try putting some in the front and some in the back. That way you can keep the balance of the gun about the same. HMB
     
  12. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Simone, 14oz is not a lot. Do_not put loose shot in the butt. Do_not pour shot into a copper tube and cap it. You will be sorry.

    Steel is not as heavy as lead, but it is heavy enough. Here is what I did for my Perazzi stock. I had steel rod cut to length and threaded at one end (so it could be easily removed later). I wrapped masking tape around both ends until I had a slip fit. Insert the rod with the threads facing out. Slit a piece of heavy plaastic tubing lengthwise and push it into the hole after the rod. Cut the excess tubing flush with the back of the stock. That keeps the rod from shifting under recoil. Reattach the butt pad and you are good to go.

    What you feel in recoil reduction wil be significant. It will affect your swing a little. I got used to mine after 25 shots. Since the weight is very close to your shoulder, it doesn't affect your swing anywhere near as much as if the weight were between your hands or on the barrel.

    If you feel the weight is too much, simply hack saw off some of the rod and try again. BTW, I had Ed Y on these threads make the first rod for me. If memory serves, it cost $20 including finishing and threading.
     
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