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*Effects of clouds on an otherwise sunny day

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by davidjayuden, Sep 9, 2013.

  1. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    Over the years of watching and scoring for the High School shooters, I have repeatedly noticed that things will be going along nicely on a sunny day. But let a cloud pass in front of the sun, darkening the landscape, and scores immediately drop.
    Now I recall the issues as they relate to rifle shooting, IE "light's up, sights up", the rationale being that the sun glare will make an unblackened front sight blade upper edge harder to see. It necessitates using sight black, or wetting the thumb and smearing a bit of dirt on to eliminate "overshooting.
    But back to the issue as it relates to trap. 1) Is it a problem that others have noticed? 2) What are the actual factors causing the loses?, and, 3) What are the solutions?
    Thanks, and I hope I'm not crazy...
    dju
     
  2. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    Just because it actually happens, doesn't mean you're not crazy. :) Mark
     
  3. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Eyes are accustomed to optimum visualization, then it becomes somewhat obscured. Shooters don't properly recognize flight path and/or shoot without proper barrel to bird relationship.
     
  4. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I think the color of lens plays a part as well. I know if I select a dark color for a bright sunny day with targets against dark green and clouds cause it to get even slightly darker, I will have a tough time picking the bird up against a dark background.
     
  5. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I used to get anxiety or panic attacks when the clouds came out and spoiled my sight picture. I use Vermillion color lenses on a nice day because they seem to drown out the eye floaters better than any other color. I now keep wearing the Vermillion lenses instead of madly switching to a lighter shade and life goes on. I don't think I'm crazy but years ago I was given a certificate by the oil industry that I am brain dead and should not be hired.
     
  6. 1oldtimer

    1oldtimer TS Member

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    I shoot most of my registered targets at Jaqua's Trap Club in Findlay,Oh. When the handicap program starts, the big clouds start drifting in. This happens about 90% of the time. It happens frequently at The Cardinal also ? Why

    Clyde
     
  7. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    I don't know Clyde. Maybe it is just that dark cloud that follows us wherever we go...
    dju
     
  8. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    Pheasantmaster:

    "Eyes are accustomed to optimum visualization, then it becomes somewhat obscured. Shooters don't properly recognize flight path and/or shoot without proper barrel to bird relationship."

    So you are saying here that we go along shooting in good light, then that light is reduced (by clouds). Shooters don't recognize the target's path in the reduced light? I don't want to put words in your mouth, so am I getting that right? If so, what is the fix? Specifically you are on the line, shooting the best score of your life. A cloud darkens the field. What do you do?
    Thanks for playing along.
    dju
     
  9. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    David... You only partially answered the question with your "light's up, sights up" comment. It is "lights up, sights up, lights down, sights down". Clouds on an otherwise sunny day has ruined many a good, and potential winning, score. Anyone that has been around trapshooting for any length of time has experienced this. The reasoning behind lowering your gun hold when clouds appear, as it relates to trapshooting, is that it gives the shooter just a little more time to acquire the target correctly in the lower light condition. It's that simple..... Just my experience.... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  10. Scott Johnson

    Scott Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Dan nailed it, lower gun you see the bird better, seeing the bird better makes the bird appear slower. Like on post # 3 doubles 1st bird, if you hold your gun just under the birds flight path, when the bird comes out it seems like it is 90m.p.h. but when you hold at the right corner of the house(2' or more below the bird), its seems like you have a lot of time to break first bird. It is brain perception, being able to see the bird better, makes it appear slower. But Mike I did not know you were certifiable and even had the card to prove it. Scott
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    When the sun is blocked by the clouds your eyes pupil dialates which has a negative effect on your vision. HMB
     
  12. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    So is it a consensus that once a cloud blocks the sun the starting hold point should be lowered, but the aim point remains the same?
    dju
     
  13. BudsterXT

    BudsterXT Member

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    It is like driving in the evening.

    It was bright but then it gets dusk,
    Your eyes take time to regain total focus as the light changes.

    That is why there are more accidents at "dusk" .

    One cloud wont affect it as bad as if it gets suddenly overcast.

    Kenny U
     
  14. rpeerless

    rpeerless Well-Known Member

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    This is interesting and true. Noticed at several shoots the scores can vary morning to afternoon, high to low with storm clouds rolling in during the afternoon. The high scores tend to be lower although some of the more experienced shooters will shoot well no matter what.
    Also, shooters will wear one color lense beginning a round in bright sun and have trouble mid round when the storm clouds drift in.
    I generally wear clear and sunglasses and haven't really gotten into all the varieties of lenses yet.
     
  15. Gapper

    Gapper TS Member

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    The clouds are actually causing something called glare, basically light rays bouncing off the clouds and entering your pupil at different angles.

    It's why scores drop when certain types of clouds are out.

    It's also another reason for higher average scores in areas like Vernal, Utah.

    Better visibility, along with thinner air. GAP
     
  16. Scott Johnson

    Scott Johnson Well-Known Member

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    Last June when we shot Vernal, on 500 or 600 caps, cannot remember the exact #, but my caps average was two birds higher than previously in the year. This could be a combination of many things, but mainly it is clear skies @ Vernal, great target setting and thin hot air. Seeing the bird is the whole she bang in this sport we love, the eyes have it.
    Could also be, shot 6 days in a row and started to get a "little" polish, and that $10,000 on Sunday for a 100 straight in caps. :) Scott
     
  17. zzt

    zzt Well-Known Member

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    Two things happen when a ark cloud passes on a sunny shoot. First, the wind changes directions. Instead of flowing mostly up in the sunlight, it now flows horizontally toward land that is still sunlit.

    Second, trap shooters lift their heads to get a better view. You can sit in the scorer's chair and watch it happen. Best advice- when a cloud comes over, press your cheek a little more firmly into the comb. You won't miss.
     
  18. davidjayuden

    davidjayuden Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. Thanks all.

    dju
     
  19. zzoom

    zzoom Member

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    Great thread! Now I have another excuse! Clouds came rolling in...
     
  20. Scott Johnson

    Scott Johnson Well-Known Member

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    I was hoping one of our All Americans who shoot all over this country and in a variety of light conditions will chime in, as their experiance in one year is more than most of us get in a life time. We will see. Scott