1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Easy swing or rabid attack?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Bruce Em, Mar 29, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Most of the time that I had been shooting trap, I held at roof level and took a nice smooth swing to the bird as soon as I saw it; until yesterday, when it occurred to me to get much more aggressive and move as fast and hard to the bird as I could and follow through while shooting. Results were impressive. Breaks seemed to be much better but I can't quite imagine why that would be.

    I don't know if this will continue to be productive or if it is a dead end. What do high level shooters recommend?

    What others do may not be obvious to the observer.

    thanks for your comments
     
  2. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Messages:
    11,122
    There,s nothing wrong with being aggressive, as long as it is controlled. Sometimes more gun speed smooths out the swing and shortens the lead.
     
  3. Onceabum

    Onceabum TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    860
    Bruce Em,

    There are two ways to shoot a target. Try to break it or try to keep from missing it. You just started shooting to break it.

    Booger
     
  4. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    14,686
    Location:
    NW Wisconsin
    Eddie is on target. Nice shot Eddie.
     
  5. Justin L.

    Justin L. Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    498
    Bruce,

    I shoot extremely fast, wasn't as fast when I was learning, but I ended up with a gift for extreme speed. If you do that when you're shooting doubles, I bet it would help you. For singles, while it helped me get to higher levels, it's often frustrating now, too. Sometimes I shoot too fast, either swinging the gun very hard and shooting in front of the target or making my normal move to the target and just pulling the trigger too soon. You need to watch out for that (it's not a gun habit to try and stop) but a little speed never hurt anyone.
     
  6. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Thanks guys this was excellent. I particularly enjoyed the "two methods" and note many, many club level shooters are aimers, and are in the latter category.

    I came to the issue of a more aggressive attack from shooting skeet at night all winter (and birds) where a number of targets just won't wait for you to wake up and address them.

    Sporting has a few like that but many presentations allow a relaxed style which lulls you into defeat.

    I appreciate the beauty of control but also recognise her ugly stepsister "speed".

    I was writing somewhere, Bullseye-L I think, on "learning to walk". Much of the Masters technique offered so graciously is correct, but the marksman doesn't yet understand that he is unable to "just do it". He/she has to learn and build up the skills required of walking before being able to run.

    best regards
     
  7. crusha

    crusha TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,762
    Easy or rabid?


    The correct answer is, "neither." But you knew that.


    The correct swing speed is the one that is in sync with the speed of _your_ eyes. Any conscious attempt to do it slower or faster than that, is a beginner mistake.


    There's nothing more alluring in the sport of trap, than the "magic secret" that seems to work on one particular practice session. You desperately want to think you've found it. "Today I did A-B-C, and the targets just started breaking better." It's like the magic golf shot. You come home excited, thinking you've cracked the code. Three or four weeks later, under different conditions, you find out otherwise.


    I'm not a high level shooter. Just someone who's seen this drama play out in others, and myself, many, many times over. How fast your eyes can see, is the rate-limiting step that controls the pace of your shooting. Your body, arms, heart, and soul can do whatever else they want...but they'll never get around this inconvenient fact. Fast seeing, allows fast shooting. Nothing else.


    Review the Phil Kiner video, where he talks about how when you're shooting your best, the target "pulls" the gun to it. When that happens, things are going right - and speed is irrelevant.
     
  8. Bruce Em

    Bruce Em Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    902
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    Thanks and yes, I have seized defeat from the jaws of victory many times and fully recognize the mental aspects of the game. You are correct "not rabid" but definitely more aggressive with regard to what I do see and when I see it.

    regards bruce
     
  9. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Messages:
    2,474
    I tend to want to wait and get the shot just right. I have to fight that urge. It is better to be aggressive and take the target out. Not just in trap but also in skeet and sporting clays. Bad things happen when you are slow and deliberate. You start thinking too much about your lead and the relationship between the target and your barrel. The wind will start to affect the target on a winday day. Wait too long and targets start dying and dropping. Now your shot is harder. Being more aggressive makes you concentrate on the target and forget about everything else. Not to the point of being out of control. You hit the target when the trajectory is more predictable before wind and gravity mess with it.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.