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Drying Lumber Question

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Auctioneer, Jul 9, 2013.

  1. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    Someone has lumber that came from a fallen tree. I was told the tree feel about 3 years ago and they sawed it up 8 months ago. It has been stored inside or under cover. How would you all grade the dryness of it?
     
  2. Shootrman

    Shootrman Member

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    I was told by a farmer that cut lumber usually drys about an inch a year by thickness. Later years he'd paint the ends to prevent checkering then put them above his hay dryer for faster drying time
     
  3. ImpalaBob

    ImpalaBob Member

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    What type of tree? Hard woods like red or white oak take longer to dry than ash or walnut. A moisture meter is a cheap investment. http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-mini-moisture-meter-67143.html
     
  4. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    Its Red Oak. From what has been said here the wood is still green.
     
  5. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    As said before it is a good idea to paint the end grain so you don't get too much radial cracking but it should have been done as soon as the logs were cut, but if it isn't it is not the end of the world, you will just have to cut off a little more to get rid of it

    And a moisture meter is a good idea
     
  6. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Was the lumber "dead piled" or put on hack sticks? Was it covered in such a way that the air could freely circulate through it? Was it kept from getting too warm too fast? Drying lumber is a science, not an art. Even in very large, computerized dry kilns, the rate of drying is closely monitored. Rapid de-moisturizing can cause warping and end-shaking. Mold is a threat if the lumber dries too slowly. If lumber is allowed to sit on the forest floor, it is an instant candidate for a host of species specific fungi. Even the time of year of the harvest affects value and grade of some lumbers.
     
  7. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    From the pic's he has used spacers and theres space between the layered boards. I don't know if its in the barn or basement.
     
  8. maka

    maka Member

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    As stated above buy a moisture meter. I bouhgt mine from Grizzly's. Goole them or Harbor Frieght. Good Luck.
     
  9. WS-1

    WS-1 Banned User Banned

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    Auctioneer,

    At this point, we need to know what the species of the lumber is and what it is going to be used for. If you want to use it for siding boards on a barn, you can hang it and let it air-dry on the structure. If it is going to be used as T&G finished flooring in the second story of a new home, then it will have to be as dry as a "popcorn fart."

    Let me know. There are a lot of variables left to be evaluated.
     
  10. DJM

    DJM Member

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    Here in Minnesota the best one can hope for air dried lumber is 12% moisture content. We have humidity in the summer. I have done it more than a few times and that is where my stacks ended up at. Conventional wisdom says you must dry one year per inch of thickness. I agree with WS-1. 12% is OK for things like outdoor furniture, siding, fencing, even T & G interior paneling. Wood in your living room in winter wants to be at about 7%. There is significant shrinkage going from 12 to 7%. I built all my cabinets with air dried wood and they are all right but I can show you some minor problems. Raised panel doors are more tolerant of air dried wood. I built a large dining room buffet with a plate display rack and that had some problems with wood warping as it dried.
     
  11. Auctioneer

    Auctioneer Well-Known Member

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    In my second post I did say it was Red Oak that I was looking at. I would rather have White Oak but I will take what I can get at this point.

    I have made two gun racks for silent auctions for kid shooting events and they sold well for them. One was pine and I just didn't like it but it did sell. The other one was Oak and it looked great and people liked it better.

    Each gun rack holds 16 guns.