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Dog training (chicken issues)

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Hap MecTweaks, Apr 29, 2009.

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  1. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Pointer, I think your in for a lot of chicken n dumplings in the near future. Very few bird dogs will leave chickens alone, it's in their genes. A pup raised with them around all the time can work out till another bird dog comes around and attacks. My brother had an English Setter that wouldn't bother my moms chickens yet was a great bird dog in the fields. He was raised around chickens from the time he was born though and knew the difference!

    I wish you luck in your barnyard venture!

    Hap
     
  2. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    Good luck. You are fighting nature trying to keep a bird dog away from birds.
     
  3. Jim Porter

    Jim Porter Well-Known Member

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    Don't worry too much. After you get her in the birds you want to hunt she will PROBABLY leave the farm birds alone. When I was a kid (about an eon ago) we kept bird dogs and dad would raise holy he#$ if one ran a rabbit or treed a squirrel. Years later, I had dogs and dad & I went hunting and Pat, my setter, ran a rabbit by him and he dropped the rabbit and patted her on the head. I was livid and as in many things he gave me a lesson. Son, when you are in birds does she do that? NO. Well then let her have some fun and you have rabbit dinner. He was right. The other posters are right too, she will do what she is bred to do. Get her in birds and let her know what you expect and all will be ok. Meanwhile, the dumplin guy may be right!
    Enjoy your dog!
     
  4. honorable mention

    honorable mention TS Member

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    Shannon: I have had pointer bird dogs since I was 14-- thats 52 years ago.
    Many dogs, and yes, most would catch any chicken that stayed on the ground, and then fetch; have even lost a couple of pet crows. Concluded many years ago that I wasn't smart enough to break them from catching the chickens.
    Grandpa told me many years ago--what the hell did I expect, they're birddogs; either pen the chickens up or pen the dogs up.

    Buried my last pointer last fall; won't raise anymore. Most enjoyable part of my life is forever gone. Miss the dogs and the bird hunting; mostly miss the companionship with the dogs. Quail are gone in this area.

    My recommendation: Stop yelling at the shorthair, it only raises your blood pressure and makes the dog hard hearing. Enjoy the dog, chickens are plentiful and cheap.

    Warren Roberts
     
  5. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    I may be asking a dumb question here, but what does she do with a bird you have shot?

    If my dog 'harmed' a bird she retrieved she would be in for it...

    Friends have chickens and my dog will point them (hell, this dog points rubber ducks). Once she caught one and brought it to me. She was pointing and the chicken walked right into her - guess I can't blame her for grabbing that one (stupid is as stupid does).

    I took it - it was unharmed - and I released it.

    I did not yell at her - just let the bird go (OK, so the bird was really scared).

    Yes, it is in their nature to 'go after' the birds, but they should only be pointing them, not catching nor harming them. Maybe 'flushing' them.

    Once a dog is 'blooded' by catching birds you may have a much bigger problem in the field - I have seen a dog tear birds to shreds before bringing them back. Never went hunting over THAT dog again.

    If she's not harming the birds I agree with honorable mention.
     
  6. highflyer

    highflyer TS Member

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    I used to have a dog that would jump the neighbors fence then jump back over with a big fat white chicken in her mouth. I still can't believe how big those chickens were. She was not hardmouthed with game birds. But carrying around a big bird all day will kill the bird. The birds were always whole when I got home and showed no signs of wear, but they were always dead.
     
  7. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe TS Supporters

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    When I was a kid we raised about 80,000 turkeys per year, and I had an airedale pup, who thought her mission was to kill every thing on the farm. She would kill a couple then drag them up to the front lawn, where she would leave them until they had "aged" properly.

    Everyone told me to tie a turkey to it and let it drag it, that would cure her, so I did, the first time I used some rope, which she chewed through, so then I used some electric fencing wire, she drug that turkey all morning, I was cultivating corn, and she was always right beside me up and down the field, then she stopped sat down and ate the damn turkey, kinda like I had packed her a box lunch.

    Well that's my story, the damn dog always killed turkeys, I was lucky my Dad didn't shoot her, but came close several times!!!!!

    Some dogs just like poultry
     
  8. BLACKDOG

    BLACKDOG TS Member

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    I do not think the dog will change, maybe after it gets older. I have three Lab's the two older one's could care less, TOO MUCH trouble, however the young female carry's them around till they quit breathing. Then she will look for another one. GOOD LUCK
     
  9. Dahaub

    Dahaub Active Member

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    Five years ago on opening day of quail season I hunted with an old friend and his buddy, they both had good dogs. While we were hunting Allan missed his older dog for awhile. When we had completed our circle and got back to the vehicles he found out where she had been. There were five dead chickens near the trucks. She had gone back to the farm house and started to retrieve the chickens she could find for us dumb hunters who were putting her in the field where there were no quail. She showed us. I'll never forget the look on Allan's face when he realized what she had done. Funny to me but disastorous to him and his old bitch. He swore she was 10 that year and had never even looked at a chicken before that time. I'm saying there isn't a chicken alive who could take her in a fair fight. One bite and a little shake and those hens were limp as last nights noodles. Champion eggs layers every one of them, dern the luck. Dan
     
  10. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    I would put an e-collar on the dog and set it at a light setting. Whenever she approaches the chickens, and gets to close, say "NO!". If she doesn't stop, zap her. If she doesn't respond, turn up the edison medicine, but not so high that it makes her yipe or jump. You don't want to ruin the dog on game birds. We just want her to undertstand that the fat white ones are off limits. It would also be helpful to put her on pen raised pheasants or quail shortly after you punish her so she knows there are certain birds that are OK to pursue. Hopefully she'll think chickens deliver a shock and game birds don't. Whenever I train a new pup to not cross the road, I use the e-collar the same way. Once their pad touches the road they get zapped, and they think the road is electrified or atleast know it's not a pleasant place to be. One of my dogs is 6 years old, and still will not cross a road until I'm there to say "OK". I'm not sure if this will work cause I've never had your problem, but you don't want to ruin a good bird dog
     
  11. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    You and the dog see the chickens in very much the same way. The only difference is in the timing.

    The way I see it is you will have a better end result if you work on training the chickens.

    BTW, I am a shorthair fan and the one thing that I can tell you for sure about them is that they are 100% full tilt bird killing machines that out of pure generosity will let you in on the action if you are worthy.
     
  12. Landyn16

    Landyn16 TS Member

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    i have a 3 year old german pointer and she has killed chickens since she was 6 months old and i have not been able to stop here. i have used shock collors and shocked her every time she evan looked at a chicken and once when she killed one i evan warmed up the tazer and she would not stop nor could i make her stop. until i got a big (21LB) mean tom turkey and it will chase her off and sper her up one side and down the other. and she wont bother the hens as long as he is it the coop.
     
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