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Dog killed by wolves

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by Brian in Oregon, Jan 1, 2010.

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  1. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    http://www.uppermichiganssource.com/news/story.aspx?id=395570

    Dog killed by wolves

    A day hunting rabbits, suddenly cut short<br>
    By Brad Soroka<br>
    Wednesday, December 30, 2009 at 6:47 p.m.<br>

    SENEY STRETCH -- It's the story of a man and his dog.

    On Wednesday, Dan Perry, his brother and dog, Lilo, were hunting rabbits on the south side of the Seney Stretch when their day in the woods was cut short.

    Lilo was hot-on-the-trail of a rabbit, barking and barking. The barking turned to a single squeal, and then...silence.

    "I yelled to my brother that there's something wrong, and I took off. And by the time I got through the brush and up into the clearing, I seen the wolf tracks, and I thought...I knew in my heart that they had killed her already," explains Dan.

    It's a case of man's best friend in the wrong place at the wrong time. The attack happened about 10 miles east of Shingleton, just west of Walsh Grade Road. Dan saw the wolf tracks, but by the time he found Lilo, the wolves were gone.

    "I would have shot them. I would have shot every one of them I would have seen. That's just the way I feel. That's the way I feel right now too," says Dan.

    According to Michigan law, if you see a gray wolf attacking a pet, livestock, etc., you can kill it. But there's a Federal law in place that trumps that. The gray wolf is an endangered species. You can't touch him.

    "The bottom line here is the Department of Natural Resources is just as frustrated as many of your viewers when it comes to the control of wolves. We do not have the authority. They are on the United States Federal Endangered Species List. It is under the control of the US Fish and Wildlife Service as far as control of wolves. Period," explains Stacy Welling, UP Field Deputy for the DNR.

    The Department of Natural Resources believes there were three wolves involved in this territorial kill. Lilo was just a hunting dog and a family pet. But now that the UP wolf population is well over 500, Dan is wondering if the woods are safe for people.

    "I had three rabbits in my back pouch. What's to say if I would have had my grandson when he gets older and he was carrying the rabbits for me...what's to say that they wouldn't have went after him because he's in their territory?"


    ------------------------------

    UPDATED Thursday, December 31 2:45 p.m.

    The attack happened approximately 10 miles east of Shingleton on the south side of the Seney Stretch, just west of the Walsh Grade Road, according to the owner of the dog.

    ------------------------------

    UPDATED Thursday, December 31 10:42 a.m.

    The owner of the dog that was killed in the probable wolf attack has released pictures to UpperMichigansSource.com and urged us to share them with our visitors.

    We warn that these pictures are graphic and show the deceased dog and the puncture wounds.

    Click here to view the three photos in a slideshow.

    We will be staying on top of this story and providing you with more information as we get it. Be sure to tune in to the TV6 and FOX UP newscasts Thursday night for exclusive interviews with the owner of the dog and DNR officials. And as always, check back on UpperMichigansSource.com for the very latest.

    ------------------------------

    UPDATED Thursday, December 31 9:09 a.m.

    In light of the recent probable wolf attack that killed a dog which was near the owner, what do you think should be done with wolf protection regulations?

    We want to know your opinion.

    Click here to vote in our poll and enter the discussion.

    ------------------------------

    UPDATED Wednesday, December 30 6:47 p.m.

    A Department of Natural Resources official confirms that a dog killed near the Seney Stretch on Wednesday was likely killed by a wolf or wolves.

    The dog, a 13-inch beagle, had ventured about 40-60 yards away from its owner who was snowshoe hare hunting when the dog was apparently attacked.

    The owner, a Munising man, didn't see the attack, but said his dog suddenly let out a high-pitched bark. The man found the dog's bloody carcass moments later.

    Terry Minzie, the DNR's Eastern U.P. Wildlife Supervisor, inspected the carcass Wednesday afternoon.

    "It appears it was probably wolves," said Minzie. "You can tell by the size of the punctures of the two canine teeth, and we know that we've had a pack of wolves in this area for several years."

    The attack occurred about midway between Shingleton and Seney.

    The grey wolf is on the U.S. List of Endangered Species.

    It's estimated that as many as 600 wolves may now live in the Upper Peninsula. Twenty years ago, there were apparently none living here.
     
  2. 100after9

    100after9 TS Member

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    awe.... poor puppy!!!! :(
     
  3. tj303

    tj303 Member

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    shoot, shovel, shut-up
     
  4. short shucker

    short shucker TS Member

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    tj303,

    Shoveling this time of the year in the UP is strictly reserved for snow. The ground is way to frozen by now.

    ss
     
  5. bling 27

    bling 27 Member

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    I have been hunting ruffed grouse in Michigan's U P since 1977. And I can tell you that there have been wolves in the U P since then. Shoot 'em and leave 'em. I think the 500 estimate on the population is VERY conservative. Wayne
     
  6. Frank C

    Frank C Well-Known Member

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    Dead Wolves tell no tales.....If we can save just ONE child....
     
  7. fssberson

    fssberson Active Member

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    If a child is killed it won't matter. The wolf lovers will just say the wolves did what is natural. It is the whole Endagered Species Law that needs to be buried.
     
  8. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    If it was left up to me there wouldn't be a living wolf in North America.
     
  9. no5shooter

    no5shooter Member

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    Here in Oregon, just substitute the word "cougar" for "wolf" and you'll figure out what we're up against. The cats haven't gotten any kids yet, but they've sure gotten their share of poodles and there are documented instances of adults being stalked by cougars. Our problem is hunting with dogs was outlawed a few years back and now we have a pretty good cougar surplus. More fun, thanks to the do-gooders...
     
  10. jagrdawger

    jagrdawger TS Member

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    A friend had a Champion Short hair killed by wolves as he walked through a county campground in north central Wisconsin a few years ago. He was exercising several GSP's on the road through the rustic campsites when a pair of wolves killed the female who was only about 50 yards behind him. They did not want to give up the kill easily and then tried to lure the other dogs into a chase.

    If they do not eat the dogs, they frequently grab in the center of the back, have a tug of war and peel the skin off of the dog over both ends. It only takes a few seconds as the man found out.

    I heard those wolves may have succumbed to another territorial predator a short time later.

    I have also heard coal trains are a great place to put wolves when it is too cold to dig. The motion keeps the mortality signal from activating on tracking collars and then they relive the "Cremation of Sam McGee"


    http://www.wordinfo.info/words/index/info/view_unit/2640/?letter=C&spage=26
     
  11. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    no5shooter, quote: <i>"Here in Oregon, just substitute the word "cougar" for "wolf" and you'll figure out what we're up against. The cats haven't gotten any kids yet, but they've sure gotten their share of poodles and there are documented instances of adults being stalked by cougars. Our problem is hunting with dogs was outlawed a few years back and now we have a pretty good cougar surplus. More fun, thanks to the do-gooders..."</i>

    My daughter (now in high school) had her grade school locked down twice for cougars on the property, and they were verified sightings. At another nearby grade school the police shot and killed a cougar as it prowled under the windows of the school while class was in session.

    As noted, hunting cougars with dogs was outlawed. This was the only real effective way to hunt them. Tags were limited. Now cougar tags are a general season tag, good for 10 months of the year. And in some areas you can get a bonus cougar tag over the counter. Turkey and varmint hunters have called them in, as have deer hunters who use calling sounds or rattling antlers. One turkey hunter got hot cougar breath in his ear (the cougar was sniffing him). He swung his muzzle and killed it at contact range. It's not easy to hunt them, but they're not quite as difficult as they once were, because their exploded population has exploded.

    On top of that, it is estimated that a cougar kills a deer every 10 days. That's approximately 36 deer per cougar per year. Multiply that by 5700 cougars (the current population estimate) and that's 205,200 deer taken every year. This figure is statewide (from http://www.dfw.state.or.us/wildlife/cougar/).

    However, the mule deer population (mule deer are almost entirely in eastern Oregon) has been declining, and ODFW has been trying to figure out why. The current population is 228,700, which is 34% below the target objective of 347,400. That's a missing 118,700 mule deer. Hunters can only account for 16,902 legally taken mule deer in 2008.

    So where did the missing mule deer go? ODFW is blaming habitat conditions, and poaching, which they estimate at 17,000 mule deer (more than hunters take). That's a suspicious number right there.

    ODFW downplays predators as a factor. And while it's easy to jump to conclusions that cougars are eating up a vast number of mule deer, the figures I wrote above are a bit misleading. In some areas the cougars are killing a lot more elk than deer, especially elk calves. In the Heppner game unit "After killing 53 cougars, calf elk survival increased from 16 calves per 100 cows in 2007 to 30 calves per 100 cows in 2008 and leveled off 29 calves per 100 cows in 2009."

    Worse, ODFW is now hiring professional hunters - with dogs - to hunt cougars in problem areas. The law banned hunting cougars with dogs, though it excepted the practice for problem areas. So now, instead of hunters paying to hunt the cougars, the taxpayers are footing the bill.

    Why was hunting cougars with dogs banned? The bunny huggers will tell you that it is "unsporting". Many of us suspect the real reason was to allow the cougar population to explode, and let cougars manage deer populations, thus making the sport of deer hunting unproductive enough to reduce the number of hunters. To that end they've partially succeeded. Many of us also suspect this is exactly why there is a push for reintroducing wolves - to reduce hunting as a means of controlling deer and elk populations.

    Keep in mind that this same law also banned using "unsporting" bait for bear. The result there was the bear populations have exploded, especially in the coast range, where bait was the only effective way to hunt them because of the terrain. There are so many bears girdling trees on timber holdings (stripping and eating bark for survival) that the state has hired professional trappers to kill large numbers of bear. In the Coos County area one year the state contracted to have 200 bears eliminated, at taxpayer expense.

    Data: http://www.centraloregonian.com/PCOOutdoors9.shtml

    BTW, cougars also are known for killing bobcats. This is why most bobcats are active nocturnally, or only at dusk and dawn in daylight hours. I have not been able to find much in the way of figures that would indicate a reduced bobcat population, but I suspect this may be happening.
     
  12. timberfaller

    timberfaller Well-Known Member

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    Brian,

    You hit the nail on the head! "Predators" factor is ignored here in Washington state also. Even with all the "fish" problems we have had to deal with here, the state and fed agency's turn a "blind eye" to the predator factor!

    We are just now getting into the wolf problem. The thing that is most interesting here in this state is, we have a game commission(set seasons and rules) who "only" listens to the "biologist" that the state has hired! They will not take any information from people who are on the "ground level" and that inclued the game wardens!

    The cougars that have attacked and mauled people here are considered a "law enforcement problem" that why the bleeding hearts(mainly on the west side of the state)have no problem with spending "tax" dollars to try and resolve the created problem!

    The west siders are so low the had the game department shoot MT Goats in the Olympic Park in order to save a flower the goats were eating! Had they allowed tags it would of netted $$$$$$ to the state instead of costing the tax payers!

    The Endangered Species Act is flawed at best, it needs to be done away with or revised with "real" data!
     
  13. W.R.Buchanan

    W.R.Buchanan Member

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    If the Endangered Species Act had a simple ammendment stating that if your "science" was used to protect something, and was found to be faulty, fabricated, or just plain false, You go to jail!.. I just bet things would change around in a hurry. If there are no consequenses for fabricating false science, then you can make it do anything you want with impunity, and say anything to get something put on the list.

    These people are so committed to their individual causes, that they are willing to lie, cheat, and steal to protect their species of their choice, or more properly stop someone else from doing something they don't like. This is the "modus operandi" of the knee jerk liberal mindset. The end justifies the means. "If it saves one life then it is a good law" Nevermind if it strips the rights of millions, if it saves one it is good. BUT!, that "one person" that it saves, has to be from a group favored by the originator of the law.

    See this all the time in the Jeep world. Most of Glammis Dunes in Imperial County CA was closed a few years back to protect the "Parsons Milk Vetch" A weed said to be endangered by offroading activities. The Offroaders got together and hired a renown Botanist to do a study on said "Weed". The Botanist found after 2 years of study which could not be disputed, and much to the chigrin of the econazis, that the weed was in fact "flourishing" and not endangered at all. It cost the Offroad people 2 Million Dollars to debunk this shit science that was swallowed by the idiots administrating the endangered species act. It is easy to get something put on but REAL hard to take something off.

    Hence, my proposal of jail for the liars!

    What do you think is driving Global Warming, is it Science, or is it Money? Tough call huh?

    Oh, on the Wolf problem,,,, you can only get a ticket for speeding if a cop sees you speeding.

    Randy
     
  14. Mapper

    Mapper Member

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    Fortunately,here in Michigan the wolves have not yet raised the bridge toll to get down here in troll land, but the cougars have. Since there are moose in the U P, there will be wolves too.
     
  15. checker

    checker Member

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    In Idaho Elk hunting....this fall....The Elk have stopped bugling.....it's like the "dinner bell" for a wolf pack. In N. Wisconsin R. Grouse hunting......the wolf gets blame for whitetail population being off 50+% over last 4 years.....DNR is reducing herd because on Average $3000 ins claim/deer encounter with a vehicle. Got my deer with my "Big Gun" F-150....pickup & "morning after" pictures....see deer on R shoulder??
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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