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Does Higher Pressure burn powder better?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by perezal, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. perezal

    perezal Member

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    Does a Higher Pressure mean that the powder gets burned faster or better? I was told not to use Green Dot with 7/8 oz because it will not burn clean because the pressure was too low.
     
  2. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    Yes - the heat of pressure is required to light off slower powders. Use a slow-burning powder in a handgun - Universal Clays, for example - and you will find the shooting bench, your gun and your hand covered with little tan discs in short order unless you use powder charges close to the maximum.

    Ed
     
  3. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Yes it does and Green Dot is a great example. The so called clean burning powders like CLAYS also generate fairly high peak chamber pressures even with the lighter shot charges.

    Green Dot works best with the heavier 1 1/8 oz target loads. (and it is one of the best in this application.)
     
  4. perezal

    perezal Member

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    What would the ideal pressure be to have a clean burn? Like 8,000PSI or Better?
     
  5. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    That depends upon the powder. Slower-burning powders require more pressure (heat).

    Ed
     
  6. Ontario Chris

    Ontario Chris Member

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    I load Alliant Extra Lite for 1 oz. and 7/8 oz. and according to the Alliant Reloader's Guide, my pressure runs in the 9,500 psi to 10,000 psi range. No unburnt powder flakes and very, very little residue. I love it.

    Chris
     
  7. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    absolutely


    GB
    DLS
     
  8. mx2k33

    mx2k33 Well-Known Member

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    Burning powder causes it to turn into a gas. Gas needs to expand and expanding gas confined in a chamber results in pressure build up. Generally, fast powders turn to gas more readily and build up pressure faster. Slower powders form gas more slowly, allowing the payload to move down the barrel before the powder is completely burnt. This results in lower pressure over time. Pressure is not heat that burns powder better.

    Clean burn is a result of the composition of the powder and not the pressure of the gas it generates.
     
  9. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    You should let Hodgdon's engineers know they don't know what they're talking about for it was one of them who told me that Universal Clays doesn't generate sufficient pressure and heat to burn completely in handguns unless loaded to near maximum charges.

    Ed
     
  10. mx2k33

    mx2k33 Well-Known Member

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    The op asked only about pressure burning powder "better". In the post "better" meant cleaner. If pressure was the main factor, then all low pressure powders would be dirty, and that is not the case. There are slow burning powders that generate lower pressures that burn very cleanly.

    And yes, increasing the pressure of a gas does increase temperature, but only if volume remains constant, which it definitely shouldn't (because as anyone with a K80 or CG knows will cause the gun to blow up). That is why burn rate is important.