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"Do Not Call" List to become permanent

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Capt. Morgan, Nov 8, 2007.

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  1. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    From MSNBC...

    <I>"If you scrambled to sign up with the National Do-Not-Call Registry in 2003, here's good news: the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) will NOT let your listing expire in 2008.

    The original law creating the Do-Not-Call Registry required listings to expire after five years, forcing participants to re-register if they want to continue blocking unwanted sales calls.

    However, the popularity of the list (over 70% of American adults have registered their phone numbers!) combined with widespread fears that many participants would forget to re-register has led Congress to propose legislation </i>[Link above]<I> to make listings permanent.

    Because it's unclear when the new bill will be passed and signed into law, the FTC recently announced that it would not eliminate any numbers from the list while the new legislation is pending.

    Plus, both the House and the Senate made progress with passing this legislation last week.

    "When the registry was developed in 2003, the five-year registration period was a reasonable way to ensure that the list remained accurate and up-to-date," the FTC said. "Our experience since then in building, maintaining and enforcing the registry has led the commission to re-examine its original position on re-registration."

    The five-year registration period was designed to help the commission remove old and inaccurate numbers from the list, but new technologies have made this "sun-setting provision" unnecessary."</I>

    Morgan
     
  2. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    Do Not Call list to become permanent

    <I>"I signed up with the Do Not Call Registry earlier this year. It worked for awhile but lately I'm beginning to receive more and more calls. Should I call in again?"</i>

    As I remember, the list rolls over 3 times a year, and not knowing when you signed on I can't say when you should see an effect. But the list won't stop all calls; it is aimed at commercial marketers. Specifically...

    <I>"Placing one's number on the National Do Not Call Registry will stop most, but not all, unsolicited calls. The following are exceptions granted by existing laws and regulations.

    * The registry only applies to residential lines, not to business lines.[3]

    * A person may still receive calls from political organizations.

    The organization Citizens for Civil Discourse has announced plans to close this loophole by developing a National Political Do Not Call Registry where voters can register their phone numbers and ask politicians to take the "Do Not Contact Pledge".[4]

    * A person may still receive calls from charities.

    * A person may still receive calls from those conducting surveys.

    * A person may still receive calls from companies with which he or she has an existing business relationship for up to 18 months after his last purchase, payment, or delivery from it, unless person specifically asks the company not to call again.

    * A person may still receive calls from a company up to three months after submitting an application or inquiry to that company, unless the company is specifically asked not to call.

    * A person may still receive calls from bill collectors (either primary creditors or collection agencies.). These callers are, however, regulated by other laws, such as those limiting them to calling during "reasonable hours." Some creditors may not call debtors who file for bankruptcy protection.

    Some attempts have been made by telemarketers to skirt the do-not-call list rules. An example is the Dove Foundation which places "survey" calls and then requests permission for a follow-up call. The follow-up call is through a for-profit company attempting to sell products. This operation resulted in a restraining order in Missouri in March 2006 [5], but the operation continues in other states."</I>

    Morgan
     
  3. Pump Gun Pimp

    Pump Gun Pimp TS Member

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    Do Not Call list is a joke. The swiss cheese loop holes let alot thru.
     
  4. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    * A person may still receive calls from charities.

    * A person may still receive calls from those conducting surveys.

    * A person may still receive calls from companies with which he or she has an existing business relationship for up to 18 months after his last purchase, payment, or delivery from it, unless person specifically asks the company not to call again.

    * A person may still receive calls from a company up to three months after submitting an application or inquiry to that company, unless the company is specifically asked not to call.

    * A person may still receive calls from bill collectors (either primary creditors or collection agencies.). These callers are, however, regulated by other laws, such as those limiting them to calling during "reasonable hours." Some creditors may not call debtors who file for bankruptcy protection.

    Some attempts have been made by telemarketers to skirt the do-not-call list rules. An example is the Dove Foundation which places "survey" calls and then requests permission for a follow-up call. The follow-up call is through a for-profit company attempting to sell products. This operation resulted in a restraining order in Missouri in March 2006 [5], but the operation continues in other states."

    SO WHAT'S LEFT?????????
     
  5. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    I believe newspapers calling about subscriptions are exempt.


    Eric
     
  6. mtn

    mtn TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2007
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    Hoggy, Get rid of your phone. Tell your phone compamy that you are tired of them not protecting your pricacy and cancel your phone. Then get a cell phone, it might cost alittle more but you will not get any unwanted calls. By the way, I went with Verizon and they will not give out your number (s)! If enough people do this the phone companies might figure out that it is more profitable to keep you as a customer rather than selling your phone numbers. It works for me.
    Fred
     
  7. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

    Joined:
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    <I>"An expiration date would allow a telephone number that has changed hands to be back in play, and it would be easy enough for the new or previous owner to re-register it."</i>

    If you are assigned a phone number and you want to be called, just have the number taken off the list. People do have to take some responsibility for the condition of their lives rather than expecting authorities and institutions to do it all for them automatically.

    From the "Do Not Call" registry web site:

    <I>What if I change my mind? Can I take my number off the National Do Not Call Registry?

    You can delete your phone number only by calling toll-free 1-888-382-1222 from the telephone number you want to delete. After you contact the registry to delete it, it will be removed from the National Do Not Call Registry by the next day. But telemarketers have up to 31 days to access information about your deletion and add your number back to their call lists, if they choose to.</i>

    Morgan
     
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