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Distance Target Broken?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Mark425, Nov 27, 2010.

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  1. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

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    I know this has been discussed before but after searching here I could not come up with it.

    How far out is the target broken from the shooter in singles? Assuming the shooter is your average or better registered shooter. I said 35-36 yards, several of my shooting buddies disagree. What say you?

    Mark

    p.s. For handicap, I said add the additional handicap yardage to the singles distance or slightly less. i.e. 26 yard shooter breaks targets at 43-44 yards.
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    With a 2-hole target, about 15 feet.



    In the old days, with 3-hole targets...about 350 feet...(uphill both ways).
     
  3. Setterman

    Setterman Well-Known Member

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    Ken Eyster shot performance patterns @ 32 yards for singles, but he patterned the handicap loads at 35 yards. I'm not saying that it represented shot distances, but thats what he did.
     
  4. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    My wife timed the interval of calling for the target and the break for 100 singles targets. Using the average and doing the math, my average distance for breaking the target is 14.7 yards from the house.
     
  5. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    When your wife said how quick you were to pull the trigger, I'm not sure she was talking about trap.

    But seriously, 14.7 yards is incredibly short.

    -Gary
     
  6. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    32 yards to 35 yards is the norm. I'd say for most shooters depending on experience and age. Newbee's abit more. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  7. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    Yes, Gary you are correct. I have been told I am fast.
     
  8. Hammer1

    Hammer1 Active Member

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    .

    My youngest son is just the opposite.

    He intentionally lets the targets go as far as possible letting them fall and shoots them just barely above ground level.

    Is actually pretty good at it.


    .
     
  9. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    35 yards is for normal shooters. Really fast shooters can hit much closer. Never measured though.
     
  10. Jawhawker

    Jawhawker TS Member

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    Average or better (ie seasoned), max 32 yds.
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    coveybuster- You must be very good with numbers. To use the time interval between when the target is released and when it is broken for an estimation of target travel, you must know the target speed. The target leaves the arm at 44 MPH and has slowed to 43 MPH when it is visible from the line. When the target is broken, it has slowed to about 35 MPH. This decrease in speed is not linear. To use your technique you would have to first calculate the time/speed curve of the target. That is not an easy task.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. dmarbell

    dmarbell Active Member

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    Pat,

    I agree. But, using an average speed would get one close. The problem with hand timed anything is that the reaction time of the observer makes accurate measurement difficult, if not impossible.

    However, let's do the exercise based on average speed. 44 mph to 35 mph, let's call it an average of 40 mph to target breakage. That's 58 2/3 ft per second. In half second increments from 0.5 to 1.0 second(s), plus 16 yards, the target would be broken at about 25.75 yards, 30.7 yards, and 35.5 yards.

    Do lots of good shooters shoot within 1/2 second of the bird appearing? If so, why would quick swing with IC choke not be effective? Skeet birds are shot at about 21 yards, with skeet chokes and number 9's.

    Danny
     
  13. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Seriously, the graph above is probably closer to the truth. I'd bet it's actually closer to 40 yards.



    If you stand back a way at a good sized shoot and watch from the side, you will see that the distance the targets have flown from the trap when broken, is visibly and significantly longer than the distance of the shooter from the trap.



    I seriously doubt many shooters are breaking singles targets consistently at a total distance of 32 yards.
     
  14. Mark425

    Mark425 TS Member

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    Thanks for the info. Now, hope ya'll don’t mind..... posting part 2 of the discussion several of us were having in a separate thread. It has to do with choke selection based on target breaking distance.
     
  15. lbshootin

    lbshootin Active Member

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    To Answer the choke question.. I normally shoot IM 1.5oz 8's for everything except doubles..I just dont shoot doubles..was never any good and suck everytime I try.. doubles P-gun setup bottom LM then top IM with 1oz 8's..Tons of guys shoot FULL for everything..(M-F on doubles)...LarryB
     
  16. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The diagram posted by 85TTR was developed by Remington. Its accuracy has been seriously questioned and the method used to develop the chart appears to be unknown.

    captin- I do not think I would be able to stand to the side of a trap house, watch where a target breaks 25-30 feet in the air and then extend a straight line from this breaking point to a spot on the ground. You would be looking at the breaking target at an angle and this can easily result in a major error.

    buzz-gun- Your technique of standing to the side of the trap and comparing the relative distance between the shooter and the house, and the house to the broken target is as good as the other methods described above. But there are still some serious angle problems. Assuming all targets are broken at the same distance, left and right hand angles will appear to be broken closer to the house. Also a shooter on post three will appear to be further from the house than the shooters on posts one and five.

    Pat Ireland
     
  17. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    Pat,


    The errors you describe will only serve to underestimate the breaking distance, but will never over-estimate it. When all the errors are in one direction, good conclusions can be made about the 32 yard hypothesis. Even with some targets being perceptively under-estimated, the observation is that the component of flight distance perpendicular to the trap line is still longer than 16 yards, and the total distance is more than 32 yards...perhaps significantly more.


    I think the point of this thread is, "It's longer than y'all think."
     
  18. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    We performed this type of measuring at my nephews trap several years back. We had a spotter on each side to the trap to align the spot where the target would break and mark that spot. Averaging out those spots agrees with the buzzer that break distances are farther out than imagined or thought!

    The old Remington diagram posted above is thought to be by guess and by golly. Remember too that diagram was drawn when the angles were greater than those today? Takes a tad longer to get on severe angles than less severe angles does! Remember too that targets were thrown a tad farther which makes a difference also.

    Our tests weren't exact science but it's a lot closer than a mere guess by a long shot! We recorded only the targets completely torn apart with a centered shot. Why, because shooters will speed up their shooting the same as they do when they know they are being video taped?

    Hap
     
  19. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    buzz-gun- I fully agree.

    Hap- A more important estimation might be how far a target has traveled when I shoot and miss it?

    Pat Ireland
     
  20. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Pat, wind turbulence behind the target adds a tad of speed to it, in front, slows it a bit. I never see many of your's slow down afterward? :)

    " Hap- A more important estimation might be how far a target has traveled when I shoot and miss it?"

    The important estimation in that case is why and how you missed it in the first place. Missed by an inch er milermore makes no difference? How one applies the aim might be in play too. :)

    Hap
     
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