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Ding in stock?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Mike G, Jul 9, 2007.

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  1. Mike G

    Mike G Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
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    Well it finally happened. After having my new KX-5 for a year I was at a shoot this past weekend and bumped the stock against a table put an unsightly blemish in the stock. I was really disappointed in myself as shown by my sub par scores after the incident. I once heard that if you put a damp cloth over the dent and applied a warm iron over the cloth it would raise the dent sometimes. Any truth to this and will it affect the finish on a KX-5 stock? Any help appreciated,Thanks.
    Mike
     
  2. KEYBEAR

    KEYBEAR Active Member

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    Mike Try the damp cloth but use a spoon , Heat the spoon on your stove make it very hot and roll it over the spot . You may need to do this three or four times if it is just a dent and the wood is not broken down
     
  3. Mike G

    Mike G Member

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    Thanks Keybear, I don't think it actually broke any wood fibers - maybe it is just the protective finsh coat. Mike
     
  4. Michael Gregory

    Michael Gregory Member

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    Feb 20, 2006
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    Location:
    Kommiefornia, but North Idaho soon... REALLY!
    claydstr- Sorry to hear about your stock, in any case there is probably a way to make it disappear, or at least pretty much. First of all, the hot iron and wet cloth trick does work a lot of the time, so it may be worth a try. (This seems like a good place to put in the obligatory statement about doing this at your own risk and trying it first on an inconspicuous small spot on your stock to make sure it won't ruin your finish) I've done this many times, and it does work, but may be less successfull on a non-oil finish stock. The success of this method depends on the ability of the wood which is dinged or dented too soak up a small amount of water. It is the heating of this water in the wood which causes the wood to 'swell' back out. If it is a sprayed on type finish, such as a polyurethane or varnish, then the success will be limited to where the finish is broken through to the wood, allowing, again, the wood to soak up water and be swelled back out. At any rate, when I have done this I used an old wash cloth and and an old iron with a broken thermostadt ... I like this iron for this because it gets pretty hot!
    If this fails, I've got a neat trick for you! Go to www.woodworker.com and but a Behlen Master burn in kit. It is not hard to use, and with a little practice you can fill dings and scratches in the finsh, and a lot of the time make them disappear. If you would like to call me and discuss this process in a bit more detail, please do, I'd be happy to tell you what I know. I can be reached during the day at (760) 788-8888. Good Luck! Michael Gregory
     
  5. JLW

    JLW TS Member

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    When I was a kid I watched an old German gent fix scratches in furniture with burn in materials. He was good and had a good eye for color matches.

    I've had little luck with the wet rag/iron procedure unles I've been raising dings while refinishing. Most often a white mark is left where the finish raised off the wood.-Jerald
     
  6. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Getting the wood damp (wet rag)and then applying heat will sometimes work to raise the wood if it is dented, but it will not work to repair the finish. I have had some luck with the moisture/heat method on old stocks with the finish completely removed.

    I have never had much luck matching burn colors, others have. The small damage on your stock is unfortunately like the first scratch on a new car. You know it is going to happen but you just do not know where or when. You might consider wiping the area with a little stain followed by a little wax. Or, you can get a combination of wax/stain (Old English). The damage will not disappear by it will not look as bad as it now does.

    Pat Ireland
     
  7. 12Gagejon

    12Gagejon Member

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    Boyd's gun stocks sells the repair hot melt sticks too. Jon
     
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