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Dillon Reloaders

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by dwmiller, Apr 20, 2007.

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  1. dwmiller

    dwmiller TS Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
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    I wanted to check and see what everyone thinks about Dillons SL900 reloader, Pro's and Con's
    Thanks
    Doug Miller
     
  2. alfermann66

    alfermann66 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    852
    I have PW's, but some friends have the SL900. They like it. The only rap I hear is it's hard to tell if it fed a primer. Having owned a Dillon DL550 for my handgun loads for 10 years I can say their service and warranty are second to none.

    Buz
     
  3. stokinpls

    stokinpls Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    6,484
    Plus's: Very fast, well made, excellent warranty, excellent telephone troubleshooting (so I hear), excellent quality of reload, has an on-board hull feeder (key to the speed), requires very little strength to operate the handle, operator's hand doesn't leave the handle for a "100" rounds at a time(second key to it's speed).

    Minuses: Sorta tall (41" full hull feeder), sorta expensive (compared to a Mec anyway), sorta complex ( a little hairy for the rank beginner), primer feed can still occasionally forget to drop a primer, and lastly and the most annoying, the primer tray and powder measure run out at an alarming rate.

    After growing up with Mecs (which are still very good buys), it is really nice to never let go of the handle, and just concentrate on putting wads in the wad guide with my left hand. You can load a box in 1'35" consistently as long as you have components on board.
     
  4. dwmiller

    dwmiller TS Member

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    May 9, 2006
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    Thanks guys keep them coming, My father had a friend that just passed away and his kids are looking to get rid of it. I have reloaded with a Mec for a couple years and a Pacific before that. I like everything that I have heard so far.
     
  5. dwmiller

    dwmiller TS Member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2006
    Messages:
    34
    Thanks guys keep them coming, My father had a friend that just passed away and his kids are looking to get rid of it. I have reloaded with a Mec for a couple years and a Pacific before that. I like everything that I have heard so far.
     
  6. Bridger

    Bridger Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    712
    i have had one for about a year now and think its well worth the money. There is a learning curve but Dillon's customer service is excellent. I load Remington hulls which for some reason seem to work better than AA's but that's okay cause I've got a large supply of green hulls. The key to making it work right seems to be that you must cycle it smoothly, complete every stroke. The primer feed is very good and you can generally tell if a primer has not seated but it still pays to watch it and makes sure a primer has dropped. Take the time to read the owners manual, it is well done. And if you don't understand something or have a problem, Dillon's tech support is extremely good. I'd buy another one in a heartbeat
     
  7. maltzahn

    maltzahn Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    542
    Location:
    Creston, IA
    Ive had my Dillon for years, and I like it. The operator needs some basic mechanical aptitude to adjust for case changes and for disassembly cleaning. Just call for warranty free parts, even based on ware. Ive got approximatly 80,000 loads through mine with no sugnificant problems, just keep it clean. Trying to go too fast or not be complete with the handle stroke causes primer feed problems. The loader becomes familiar with his unit, and for me I, watch each cycle of the swing arm with the new primer to make certain it is in place. You will also develop a feel for the loader, realizing when something is wrong.

    Great lifetime loader for the mechanical minded.

    Maltzie
     
  8. ANTRIM UDF

    ANTRIM UDF TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2007
    Messages:
    212
    I had one, shipped it back, no BS. Enjoy my hand crank Spolar. Most folks enjoy whatever they have; no need to spend Spolar dollars but it will be worth every penny.
     
  9. jim brown

    jim brown Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    1,158
    Location:
    Nebraska
    I have a Dillon and a Mec with a power drive. I like them both. The Dillon is much faster but too big to travel in the MH. I usually don't recommend Dillon because they are more difficult to adjust and set up then most other loaders. The good news is that once adjusted they tend to stay that way and never need readjustment. The Mec on the other hand is pretty easy to set up but I need to twink it about every time I load on it. The Dillon doesn't break and if it does the parts are free from Dillon (even if you are not the original owner). The Mec breaks lots of parts and you have to pay for every one (even if you are the original owner).

    Bottom line is if you have a little mechanical aptitude and don't mind spending an evening setting it up, buy the Dillon. If you think a hammer is for putting in faucet washers don't go anywhere near a Dillon, it will drive you crazy.


    jim brown
     
  10. Jerry944t

    Jerry944t Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    1,860
    Location:
    PA
    I have over 100,000 rounds through mine and I love it. It is very fast and the powder and shot drops are accurate and infinetly adjustable. Without sweat I can crank out 100 rounds in 7 minutes.

    I have it set up for STS hulls and there are no issues. Once in a great while a primer doesn't drop on time but that is the one station that is easy to keep an eye on. If you put too many hulls in the case feeder you will get an occaisional jam but that takes a second to clear.

    The Dillon folks are great if you need any help. Yes there are some initial adjustments as well as a learning curve but once mastered you'll swear by the Dillon. Do make sure it is mounted on s sturdy bench and yes it is large and high.

    Smash Em,

    Jerry
     
  11. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    7,763
    I have two SL-900's. I've had all the rest, except the Spolar. Dillon is by far the best I've owned. I have loaded, I would guess over 100,000 shells through them. I use STS and AA's interchangeably on both loaders. One for singles one for handycap. They don't like Claybuster wads To many bent petals. But, work great with all other wads I've tried. Would I buy one again? Yes. There not cheap. But, nothing good is cheap.
     
  12. 3DHC

    3DHC Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    92
    I have reloaded 60k + shells through my Dillon SL900 with little trouble over the last five years or so. As many others have mentioned, you need to develop a rhythm and feel for the machine. It takes a little mechanical aptitude to get it adjusted correctly and a primer will fail to drop from time to time. However, you can really churn out quality reloads with little physical effort. I have had both Pacific and MEC reloaders but prefer the SL900. In fact I used to have MEC Grabbers in all the common gauges but only kept the 410 as I use the Dillon for 12 (mostly), 20 and 28 gauge reloading. It takes about 15-minutes to change the head assembly and other components. I bought separate powder measures for each gauge which makes the final adjustments a little faster. Its not uncommom to load 1000 shells at a sitting.
     
  13. TommyTEREX

    TommyTEREX Member

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    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    495
    I`m very pleased with my SL900, as I have been with all my Dillon loaders. I have to admit it took some tweeking to get it working smooth, ie, shell drop, and sometimes it dosen`t feed a hull all straight, but my mecs weren`t the slickest operations on the block either . For my money ,go Dillon.

    Tom R.
     
  14. Gil

    Gil Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    93
    I started with a Herter's Model 70. Progressed to a MEC 600, then a Mec 650 and then to a PW 600(I think). When I returned to the US I bought a Dillon. It was the best for the money (I thought) at the time, around 2000. I have loaded about 120,000 round with it. I have shipped it twice to Dillon to realine the shot drop etc. I think a Spolar is every bit a good but it costs more. I have had problems with alighning the wads when they drop into the shell. Otherwise not too much. I would recommend the Dillon agains the fore mentioned loaders with the exception of the Spolar. I don't have much in the mechanical field but I have been able to make the necessary adjustments. If you buy the Dillon and don't like it, I don't think you will loose much. The same can be said for the Spolar. You are not going to save a lot of money reloading now, but you can make shells to your own specifications and for me that is important. I recommend that you buy the SL-900. Gil
     
  15. Beancounter

    Beancounter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    482
    If a gal from the Blue Press is going to come over to the house and set the machine up, I will tell you it is the best loader ever.
     
  16. 27 YARDS

    27 YARDS TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    15
    I started with a Pacific 266 inline stage loader. Then went to a 366 for twenty seven years. Bought a Dillion SL900 and won't look back..New or used..Thay will take care of you...PERIOD. As on all loaders, keep your eye on the primers. Thay all need to be looked at...
    Four years and 100,000 later, It's still a Dillion..

    Lovin' it and usin' it...Bruce
     
  17. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Messages:
    7,763
    Gil: "problems with alighning the wads when they drop into the shell"

    Check if the wad alinement bar is straight. Mine got bent a a little some way and I had the same problem. I tapped it straight using a large dowell and never had anymore problems.
     
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