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Deglossing a gloss stock?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by nhp1, Sep 25, 2008.

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  1. nhp1

    nhp1 TS Member

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    I'm wanting to purchase a particular Browning O/U but it is only offered in gloss finish. I'd like to find out if a gloss stock can be deglossed? I like the oil finish better since it will be a hunting gun. Thanks!
     
  2. crusha

    crusha TS Member

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    "Very" Fine (00) steel wool will knock that shine right off.
     
  3. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    On glossy linseed oil finishes I used to use a powder called Rotten Stone.

    Good stuff for the purpose.

    HM
     
  4. nhp1

    nhp1 TS Member

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    I guess what I meant was actually removing the lacquer or whatever they use? I would like to get it down to bare wood that way I could just oil it. Thanks
     
  5. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    the stuff is tuff, really more work than needed. If it is a hunting gun the shine will go away in time.
     
  6. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    BIX furniture stripper is great for stripping off Brownings finish. I used it on an XS Skeet I had before refinishing the stock with linseed oil.
     
  7. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    Depends on the finish. What manufacture?

    When we used to make the stocks for Weatherby, we would soak the defective ones in Acetone to soften up and dissolve the Permalyn finish.

    Whiz
     
  8. nhp1

    nhp1 TS Member

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    Browning is the manufacturer.
     
  9. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    I would NOT use that scotch bright stuff (if I understand correctly what doggai is talking about)unless you plan on sanding off the checkering and everything else. A gel or liquid stripper with work well without taking off any wood. Any way you go it's quite a bit of work.
     
  10. JDinTX

    JDinTX Member

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    I'm also interested in taking the gloss finish off of one my guns. I want to go down to bare wood and start with oil. With so many ways, how do we know which is best. I'm thinking about the stripper myself. Anyone actually done this before? If so and it worked, please tell us how you did it. JD
     
  11. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    I have. My parents were antique dealers and refinished a lot of old furniture. They used BIX (other strippers work too)and I used it to redo a XS Skeet. You just put it on wait awhile than wipe it off. May have to do it a couple of times. It's messy though and you need to wear rubber gloves as the gel stripper is very hard on the hands. Just follow the directions it's pretty simple. This will definitely get you to bare wood.
     
  12. JDinTX

    JDinTX Member

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    Hoggy, How did the lindseed oil finish turn out, and what was your application process? JD
     
  13. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Just so you guys know I strip stocks for $50. No chemicals or water used I sand them. It's much safer and I find many repairs to the wood when refinishing. I've learned my lesson if you use stripper on a gun stock two things can happen. The wood will swell or there will be some sort of epoxy repair or bedding and the stripper will ruin that as well.

    When I do a stock for a customer I also recut the checkering border. Repointing old checkering is quoted on a stock by stock basis but most are around $75.

    Joe
     
  14. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    I had one hot tanked by a furniture stripper worked out very well
     
  15. sharhope

    sharhope Member

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    another trick when using stripper is to wrap the stock in aluminum foil it gives the stripper more time to loosen the finish
     
  16. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    JDinTX,
    The stock I did turned out really well. No one that saw it had anything neg to say. I was happy with it. After all the old varnish etc is off. simple wet sand using the linseed oil and a small amount of mineral spirits to fill in the grain. Than just simply reapply linseed oil (I also like marine teak oil) than wipe off. Do this about 3 times and it's a done deal. Professional might have better ways but this works pretty well for a do it yourself. Make sure you dispose of the linseed rags in appropriate ways because of spontaneous combustion. Be cafeful not to sand off the checkering. That's the one real drawback to doing it yourself unless you know how to rechecker.
     
  17. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    There are two paths you might take.

    First, lighter fluid, applied with cheese cloth or the like can 'cut' the gloss and create a mat finish from the gloss one. I would try an area that is not obvious to see if you like it.

    Second, UGL makes a stripper called ZAR - it is applied as a thick gel and then left to stand. It is DEACTIVATED by oxygen (i.e., air) so after standing it 'turns off' on its own. Clean up involves some light rubbing - checkering can be cleaned with a tooth brush, after a light sanding to smooth out the grain and you are ready for stain and finish.

    Normally one application is all you need (once I had to touch up some odd areas, otherwise it is a 'one and done' process), I have stripped REALLY thick urethane with it.

    Good luck,

    David D
     
  18. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    I wouldn't do it. Browning finish is tough to remove. They have the ability to make plain wood look good. Your stock will end up looking worse and the value will be lower. The checkering will get a little buggered up regardless of how carefully it's done and will need to be repointed. You will be sorry an full of regret saying,,, what the hell was I thinking.
     
  19. JDinTX

    JDinTX Member

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    thanks Hog, I think i'm gonna give it a shot, as soon as I locate all required. I'll post how it turns out when I get around to doing it. JD
     
  20. hoggy

    hoggy TS Member

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    Make sure you wear rubber gloves with the stripper. It will affect the skin. Be prepared it is messy. Have some patience and you'll be ok. Also a small paint scrapper is recommended to get the majority of the old finish/stripper off once the old finish softens up. JerryP is right in saying that the Browning finish is tough but a good stripper such as BIX and others (ZAR as mentioned above) although I have not used that brand softens it up really well. Just take your time and make a fun project of it. OTOH you may just want to spend $50 to gun fitter. It would be easier.
     
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