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Daro Dandy comparison

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by butcher, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. butcher

    butcher Member

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    How does Daro Dandy's CD or book compare to the other top shooter's CDs and books.
     
  2. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    It is Daro Handy, and both the book and the DVD have some good information in them. He is a perfectionist. Mark
     
  3. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I have read Daro's book at least 6 times and I am a believer in his methods. The DVD kinda starts where the book leaves off and it has some sort of what I would call special gimmicks that didn't really work for me. I think the book is excellent and the DVD is OK provided you read the book first.
     
  4. Trapmanjohn

    Trapmanjohn Member

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    If you follow Daro's advice your scores will increase and you will become a more consistent and better shooter.

    Hit 'em hard,

    John
     
  5. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    Daro's book is the best. Read it several times and still refer to it. His ideas are a bit different from other trap teachers but I think they work.
    Anybody that can run 500 straight 27 yd cap targets has to know something about shooting trap.
    .Smokit
     
  6. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    Since you guys use his methods, can you take a moment and describe them for me? Just the basics of what you do after calling pull.

    Thanks,

    Joe
     
  7. mx8dave

    mx8dave Member

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    Joe,,,buy the book ...MX8Dave













    joe
     
  8. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    Joe Kuhn... You can't begin to compare Daro's book to any other book, as Daro is a total perfectionist, as Mark stated. He leaves nothing out, or unaddressed. I've read them all, and Daro's book, along with Frank Little's book, is the definitive book for trap shooters, period! For us to even try to define how his book works for us would be futile, since what works for us may, or may not, work for you. Buy the book and see how it helps you.. You won't be sorry you did... Just my experience.... Dan Thome (Trap2)
     
  9. SMOKEIT

    SMOKEIT Well-Known Member

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    Joe, I will give you one example. You must be aware of the bead and see it more clearly in your peripial vision than you might guess. Never get your focus very far FROM THE BEAD. Bead awareness is just as importanrt as target awareness..Also he will teach you how to set up a gun to shoot off the end of the barrel.Smokit
     
  10. abbielew

    abbielew TS Member

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    Smokit, You are gentleman indeed, at least you did try and give a little
    insight into Daro's book.

    Birddog
     
  11. eric

    eric TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I have read the book SEVERAL times and come away with something more each time. Also have watched the DVD several times - its pretty long and could have easily been made into 2 separate DVD's. Both are packed with information from a student of the game.

    I have taken numerous Handy Clinics and have gotten something out of them every time. However, my thick skull sometimes needs things to be repeated more that once before sinking in. Sometimes, things just "click" and it makes sense where it maybe did not before.

    His Clinics are limited to 5-6 people or so and you get a great deal of personal instruction. Give both the book and Clinic a try.

    Eric Olson
     
  12. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    Just to clarify one point, at No time in his book does Daro tell you to look AT the bead but he tells you to NOTICE the ghost image of the front bead in your peripheral vision. My favorite chapter in the book is called "Eye of the tiger".
     
  13. schockstrap

    schockstrap Active Member

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    First let me say that I'm a big fan of Daro Handy's book. It has a lot of great information that has helped me, particularly with the handicap event.

    That said, Daro's writing style isn't very good at getting the information across the first time that you read it. You have to read the book a few times in order to start seeing how much info is really packed in there. I think the problem is that he wrote the book as if he's having a personal conversation with you. If the conversation were live, he would be able to demonstrate some of the points directly, you'd see his facial expression, and you'd hear the tone and inflection of his voice so you would be able to pull out the important points more easily. The text in the book doesn't give you that advantage.

    Case in point, there is a section in the book (a few pages after The Eye of the Tiger) called "Trigger Control Exercise" that Daro states will be "the best practice improvement tool you will ever use!". The first time I read the book, I must have read that section 5-6 times before I figured out what the practice exercise was. In 2 pages of text he mostly talks about how awesome the technique is, and the actual exercise is described in one short sentence buried in the middle of a paragraph. I was seriously frustrated in my first reading attempt... I felt like the book was just a teaser to get you to sign up for a class where he would tell you the real "secrets". The second time I read the book I realized that the "secrets" really are all in the book. He tells you exactly what he does to ensure success, and gives some fairly detailed recommendations that eventually will jump out at you but good luck taking it all in during the first couple of readings...

    I don't know Daro, and the only time I met him in person was when I bought the book from him and his wife at the Grand several years ago -- but I do get the sense that he is genuinely interested in helping people learn to shoot better through a more systematic approach. His book needed a better editor that could help arrange the information in a way that is more easily understandable, but the content really is about as good as it gets.

    --Dan
     
  14. Trap2

    Trap2 Well-Known Member

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    schockstrap... I couldn't agree more! I have the pleasure of knowing Daro, personally, and every time I am around him he helps me, in one way or the other, to improve my game. I have also taken Daro's clinic and will share this with you all: If you decide to take a clinic from Daro, read his book through a couple times first so you can address all of your questions directly to him at that time. He will take all the time you need to get the answers sorted out. He really does want to impart what he knows to other shooters and has no qualms about sharing his knowledge. Daro is a country boy, and he's not into a bunch of B/S mumbo jumbo to help your shooting. He's going to tell you like it is. He is straight forward in his approach and will only teach you what he KNOWS will work for you. He's just a great shooter that wants others to be great shooters as well. If you listen to him and read his book several times, you will see he's as real as it gets.... I, myself, appreciate that in a man... Dan Thome (Trap2)

    Birddog.... As you can plainly see from the 2 posts above about the beads, everyone reads, and interprets, things differently. Buying, and reading, the book is the only way to see if it helps you. Just because I read something that helped me doesn't mean it will help Joe... Just saying.... Ya know?
     
  15. puablo

    puablo Well-Known Member

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    Could very possibly be one of the best teachers in the game...JMO...He definitely knows his stuff.

    I shot for 35 years, kind of shooting the style he gives...seeing a definite bird to bead, basically looking thru the bead at the target. Had lots of luck shooting that style. With age and eyesight change, I have changed my style- now concentrating mainly on the target...may try going back...
     
  16. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    I did buy the book and gave it a fair shot. I agree with Dan - Daro needed a better editor to help him with the text.
     
  17. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Good Book...
     
  18. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    There is nothing in this book that is not clear. Joe doesn't get it as well as lots of other guys. I have known many shooters who have had lessons from all the greats and I have had many of them tell me that the system that Daro teaches works best for them. That is.. when they do it.

    One of the problems for so many guys is that they try and get Daro to perfect the method of shooting that they are doing all ready. It is not an unrealistic expectation from a coach but it really is unrealistic from the standpoint that we (Most of us) are not AAA 27 AA shooters that just need the smallest of polishing.

    Most of us are doing what we think is right and although our methods have not bore fruit... "WE" want Daro to perfect our method.

    As a coach I would say look you simple minded son of a gun . If what you were doing was working, you wouldn't need me. Instead the average coach just polishes the turd that shows up at his clinic or private lesson and takes his money knowing full well the guy's making so many mistakes with "HIS METHOD" that he doesn't have a snowballs chance in hell of winning an event.

    Daro doesn't do that.

    He teaches you his way because your way isn't really working so why would he want to perfect "YOUR WAY?"

    These are my words, not Daro's. He is far too kind to say what I just said, but I think it's the truth.

    It seems like everything in the book makes more sense once you have been shooting a while in the fashion that Daro teaches.

    Preconceived notions are part of being a human being as we are all a product of everything that has happened in our life, as well as in our shooting careers.

    It's hard to put all that aside when it seems to work (Our method and other methods) really well for so many people even if it doesn't work all that well for us.
    It's kind of like the definition of insanity. Doing the same thing but hoping for a different result.

    Doesn't work in a flawed shooting style any better then it does a bad golf swing. Jeff
     
  19. superxjeff

    superxjeff Active Member

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    Since you guys use his methods, can you take a moment and describe them for me? Just the basics of what you do after calling pull.

    Thanks,

    Joe


    Joe, 99% of what you will have learned from the book or Daro's course will have been spent prior to the call of pull!

    From the call it's a simple matter of waiting for the target to clear your muzzle and shooting it with the eye, bead and barrel combination.

    It's everything that went before that that makes this last step ( breaking the target) far easier.

    The biggest thing I have learned from Daro is that none of us miss very many targets. Although the scorer will record it as a miss ( Lost) it really was not a miss as that implies you were close in the first place. If you were a few inches off, you might call it a miss but the reality is that you miss most targets because of a mistake made during the set up.

    This set up mistake caused you to "MISS" the target. Most of the targets you miss you wouldn't have broken with an extra two ounces of shot!

    He proves this to you with the video tape. When you realize that you just missed a target by 10 feet that you thought should have broke, That knowledge allows you to go forth and put all your effort into what is important and it isn't looking for and focusing all your energy trying really hard to see that target!


    Focusing all your energy looking for that target. Biggest mistake most shooters will ever make but 99% of all people believe exactly the opposite.

    The target has it's place and time to be the focus of our attention but it isn't until a certain point in the set up.

    When focus becomes the set up and not the target you will soon see the targets start to break easier then they ever had. Again... This info is contrary to what we( most of us) have learned.

    There are many people that simply can not do it because they have too many preconceived notions about shooting.
     
  20. joe kuhn

    joe kuhn Furry Lives Matter TS Supporters

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    I'm with you Jeff, more than you think. The reason I looked at Daro's method is because my scores were falling off. Neil Winston was able to put Daro's method into words I could understand and now I'm seeing an improvement along with an increase in confidence. Neil's words seem to have filled in a blank to the extent that when I miss it's very easy to see why. I've noticed a bad setup at the shoulder, wandering attention, and a bad move. These all led to a miss. Very helpful, indirectly coming from Daro.

    My hat is off to you, Neil and Daro.

    It should be obvious to anybody, it you're not shooting hundred straights, there's room for some kind of an improvement. Whether or not you look for ways to improve is another matter.