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Curious about Custom Stocks

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 12ShotTwo, Jun 10, 2012.

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  1. 12ShotTwo

    12ShotTwo Member

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    I see blank stocks being sold but don’t know the steps and costs involved in making a stock. For instance I own an extra Citori receiver/forend hardware without a stock and know that I can purchase a finished stock/forend for $300.00 or so but what’s involved in the custom approach? In my case I know what I need in terms of fitting so I already know what dimensions I’m looking for. What does it cost for someone to inlet the blank, or bring the wood to a point where I can do final finishing? I think others here would like to hear the options and costs involved. Joe
  2. ramorton

    ramorton Member

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    Wenig carries what you need. Give them a call and they will walk you thru the process and let you know what they have available. Roy 660-547-3334
  3. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Figure around $2500 minimum for someone to fit you for a custom stock, produce the stock, and fit/finish/checker it. Plus wood, or using your wood (if the stockmaker accepts it as suitable).
  4. 12ShotTwo

    12ShotTwo Member

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    I know how to get a gun to fit me(been doing it for 35 years), I was asking about the process/cost of making a custom stock. Gennerally how much does inletting cost? How do you know how to pick out a good piece of wood? How much sanding and fiting is left after paying for inletting? Can those with real experience in doing it chime in? I think this can help others like me who do a lot of our own gunsmithing. Thanks Joe
  5. turmite

    turmite Member

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    12ShotTwo,

    I am a stock maker who has made only a handful of shotgun stocks. There is a saying about 90% inletted stocks. The 90 that is already gone, is just about 10% of the work! I think this is true whether shotgun or rifle.

    I would tell you to ask yourself if you believe you have the dexterity and eye, and patience, and tool and, and and to do a stock even from the semi finished state. If you are confident, then I would go for it in a heart beat. If there is any doubt, pay someone to do the job for you up to the finish then do that!

    I personally cheat and use cnc to inlet with and therefore part of the reason I have only done a few shotgun stocks. Everything requires a program and a fixture, or two, or three!

    Mike
  6. 12ShotTwo

    12ShotTwo Member

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    Ya I know what you mean Mike, I have fitted, bedded and finished a number of rifles through the years including my match rifles so I know where your coming from. I'm just guessing with the cnc machines you do cut the work down quite a bit and can see from Wenig's web site they have a lot of support for this. I didn't see any pricing however. Joe
  7. high 2

    high 2 Member

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    Be careful when buying semi-inletted stocks and fore arms. As turmite stated above, that last 5-10% is the most important. I've had several customers send me "the almost done" stuff bought at discount prices thinking they got a deal. It was faster and cheaper to start over from scratch. A lot of the semi-inletted stuff is done knowing that they aren't going to be the ones doing the final fit. Its so much easier to do the close cutting with the duplicator, and not by hand.
    Wenig has sold a bunch of the new American style stocks, and can be a good place to start, but they are hardly custom fit. I guess you could call them production custom.
    Larry
  8. mcneeley5

    mcneeley5 Member

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    I am currently involved in a custom shotgun build. To have Wenig semi-inlet YOUR wood the fee is based on replacement cost of your wood. You need to send the blank in for appraisel before they will price machine work.
  9. 12ShotTwo

    12ShotTwo Member

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    Thanks for all the inputs you guys. I'm going to proceed with Wenig but I'm going to order only their low end standard grade butstock (~$150) and then use it as a pattern for a more expensive stock. This will allow me to practice my woodworking skills and verfy fit through testing before I have the expensive stock made. I'm still not sure of how to pick a quality blank (any inputs on this would be welcome) but I guess I have time for that. Joe
  10. David McMillen

    David McMillen Member

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    This was my experience last year. I had an english walnut blank drying out, and after it was ready, sent to Wenig to have 90% fitted. Cost was $350.00, and then had a friend finish out and complete with finish and checkered. That was another $650.00. So, the total was with orininal cost of blank $1500.00. Weing wanted $1900 extra to finish. Their total cost would have been $2250, plus the cost of the wood blank. Alot to be said of having the stock fit to you. But in later years if you loose weight or gain weight, your sight picture will change, and you"ll have to refit stock to you.

    David McMillen
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