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Cracked Stock

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by psfive, Apr 4, 2008.

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  1. psfive

    psfive Member

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    Had an accident, had a shotgun dropped, landed on the butt plate hard. Cracked at the point of mounting to the reciever. Crack about 1-1/2 inches long. I can open it up slightly with force. Any one have any ideas on how to repair it. This not an expensive gun but it needs to be fixed. When I pry it open it goes to about 1/32". Help. Paul
     
  2. Fritzboy

    Fritzboy TS Member

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    My a** is cracked and it works fine. I heard that one fifty years ago.
     
  3. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Get some Acraglass bedding compound from Brownell's and open the crack slightly to apply a small, but ample amount into the crack. Make sure you do this with the stock removed from the gun. Clean up the area where it mounts to the receiver once the Acraglass cures and then reinstall it. It won't make a pretty repair, but it should hold as long as the stock fit's the receiver properly. In a pinch, a good epoxy will also do well. I've used the Acraglass many times to repair or alter a stock.
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Quack Shot gave some good advice that I would like to expand a little. First, Acraglass is a good choice. Another is Devcon available at Wall Mart and similar stores. Both are epoxy adhesives. The crack sounds like it is in a thin section of the stock so reenforcement pins cant be used. In the inside of the crack, I like to cut a small V shaped channel along the crack. I use a checkering file but a triangular file or even a scraper can be used. I extend this grove 1/8 inch past the crack. I then cut a few small V shaped channels at right angles to the channel that follows the crack. Cut one of these small channels at the far end of the first channel. Then apply the epoxy from the inside and wiggle the wood so that it flows out to the finished surface. Wipe things off and clamp the stock for 30 minutes. The repaired crack should be stronger than the surrounding undamaged wood. Remember to have all the excess epoxy cleaned up before putting the stock in some sort of clamping system.

    If the crack is in thicker wood, I would add another step. That is, drill one or two very small blind holes (1/32 inch or less) at right angles to the crack and insert a few steel pins cut so they nearly pass completely through the wood. The small steel pins can be made from small finishing nails cut to length. Partially fill these holes with epoxy and insert the pins. This second step can be done after the first step, described above has been completed.

    Total working time for both steps is about 30 minutes.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. JLW

    JLW TS Member

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    To ammend Pat: I like to use brass pins but any thing will work. You can add a layer of fiberglas cloth to the inside too but you will possibly have to remove some wood (.030") first.
    I have started using Devcon as it is cheaper and gets used up before it goes bad.
    BTW- Gorilla glue "foams/expands" as it cures and will make an ugly mess.-

    Email if you can send a pic and would like more explicit directions-Jerald
     
  6. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Use a clear epoxy and add a little color to the epoxy so it will match the wood. HMB
     
  7. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    I had several stocks repaired by local furniture restorer, great prices also. look up locally.
     
  8. Okie 1

    Okie 1 TS Member

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    I sent you a PM
     
  9. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    I think a lot of what has been recommended is good -but overkill. Get a tube of thin thin fast setting cyanoacrylate. Pry the wood apart and let it drip into the 1/32" crack that you described. Capillary action will spread the glue through the entire cracked area and it will bleed into the surrounding wood. This will make the crack stronger than the rest of the wood. It will take about one minute and cost about $2. If you're careful, the crack will hardly be noticeable and the stock will be as strong as before.
     
  10. jsteenson

    jsteenson Member

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    lightly spread the creack and work carpenters glue through the crack to the other side with your finger and then clamo it until dry.I've done it a few times and it always works well.Jack
     
  11. Pass103

    Pass103 TS Member

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    Lay a bead of Elmers glue on top of the crack , spread the crack a bit and blow the glue in with a soda straw, clamp with rubber bands. Fowl Frank
     
  12. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Check out this site for stock repairs.
     
  13. theodorescolt45

    theodorescolt45 TS Member

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    I have repaired about 40 to 50 stocks over the years, used all types of adhesives and pins and other methods to strengthen the effected area. In the past years though I have found a much simpler, cleaner, cheaper way to repair the typical tang and or wrist cracks. If you go to a local hardware store ( home depot stopped carrying this type and I bought out what they had for .29 cents a tube ! .. but some of it hardened and was useless as it was stored too long, i guess it can go bad ) ... Anyway, look for Crazy/Instant glue that is for porous surfaces, it's usually called "for wood and leather" and try to get the "gel" and not the liquid" as it's easier to work with and sets slower. Then clean the effected area ( if needed ) and open the crack as far as you can without enlarging the crack. Then squeeze as much of the "gel" into the cracked area as you can. Next, apply pressure, I have a small B&D vice that has padded jaws I use of id I need more pressure I use the large vice with large padded jaws ( actually pine wrapped in rubber ). Apply as much pressure as you can without distorting the open tang area. Depending on the break sometimes I mount the receiver to be sure I do not go too far on the pressure. Quickly clean up any excess glue that spilled out and let dry overnight. Yes it dries faster than that, but when the "gel" hardens like this any excess cleans up easier. Clean up ? can be Nothing ( if you applied Just enough glue ... only got that lucky once and I always assume more is better to get contact to the surfaces as much as you can ! ) What I normally end up using is a single edge razor blade followed by tome 320/400/600/800 grit paper and then touch up finish as needed, usually just a little Tru-Oil or water based urethane depending on the finish works fine. 98% of the time is almost impossible to see, sometimes you see a line but it looks like grain. I fellow shooter still shoots a Winchester 96 skeet gun that I repaired this way about 5 years ago and never had a problem with the repair ! I've repaired about 15 Remington Rolling Block Stocks, 5 Trapdoor stocks and the rest shotgun stocks in this fashion and never had an issue with them cracking again. This is a lot easier fix then the epoxy fix. I've used both, but this is less time consuming to apply and clean up.

    Long Post, sorry, good luck ... should only cost you about $2.00 for Instant Glue gen for Wood and Leather

    -oo
     
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