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Cracked Forearm

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by bt100ed, Aug 8, 2009.

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  1. bt100ed

    bt100ed TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    What is the best glue to use to repair a crack in a forearm? The crack is about 3" long.
    Thanks
    Ed
     
  2. pjh

    pjh Member

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    super glue.. work it in very carefully. if you lightly wax the outside of the forend by the crack the overflow glue wont stick to the out side.
     
  3. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    Devcon clear 2 ton epoxy. Use a piece of fiberglass screen on the inside surface of the forearm to give it added strength. HMB
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    HMB posted a technique that is much superior to the use of "super glue".

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Spanky

    Spanky Active Member

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    I've made this repair with Super Glue and Gorilla Glue. The Super Glue may be easier for you to use but, the Gorilla Glue is better. The Gorilla Glue will need the piece to be wet or dampened. Some of these hair line cracks were common in the Remington 1100.
     
  6. pjh

    pjh Member

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    Ok now heres a catch. Find out why the crack started. what was the cause and fix that also. I proposed the super glue because you need a thin runny glue. Beware of certian glues that expand. They may make the situation worse.
     
  7. Shady Creek

    Shady Creek TS Member

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    HMB is right.....GOOD LUCK
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have repaired many splits in forearms. Some have told me that my method is over kill, but it is the only way I would attempt to do the work. If the split originates at the forearm latch and runs back into the wood, there is an inletting problem that must first be corrected. A small scraper can relieve the pressure between the metal and the wood. If the split does not involve any metal parts it was probably caused by dropping the gun.

    I use a small triangular file to cut a channel on the inside along the entire length of the crack and extend this cut about 1/8 inch past the end of the break. The depth of this channel should be around 20% of the thickness of the wood. Next, I cut a few cross channels at a right angle to the first channel. These should extend about 1/4 inch on each side of the crack. These cross channels should be deep enough to hold a supporting material. I used to use small pieces of steel in these cross channels but have now become convinced that small pieces of bamboo are superior to the steel (steel was cut from very small nails). Fill the channels with a good two part epoxy and open the split enough for the epoxy to flow into the split. Put the supporting material in the cross channels and fill them with epoxy. Don't worry about putting too much epoxy into the grooves. It can be quickly removed after 12 hours of so.

    Bamboo is much stronger than steel (by weight), it remains slightly flexible and is readily available from me. It grows in my yard. I can furnish pieces between 1/64" to 2.5 inches in diameter. Lengths are from 3" to about 25 feet. The cost of the bamboo is a self addressed stamped envelope.

    Pat Ireland
    885 Mountain View Drive
    Christiansburg, VA 24073
     
  9. Dave P

    Dave P TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Interesting post. What kind of guns are we talking about mostly? Is the fiberglass mesh solution something the average guy can do BEFORE we have problems, preventive maintenance so to speak?
     
  10. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Dave- You could apply epoxy over a fiberglass mesh to add some strength to the forearm but the best thing you can do is not drop your gun and break the wood. In general, I would advise you not to fix anything before it breaks.

    Pat Ireland
     
  11. hmb

    hmb Well-Known Member

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    That is pretty bad advice Pat. Reenforcing the forearm before it breaks is a good idea. HMB
     
  12. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

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    I use any Cyanoacrylate (super glue), but I have two types: (1) the standard one that flows often too freely, and (2) gap glue. Both are tenacious adhesives. The gap glue is better for areas where both surfaces cannot be matched exactly.

    Since I used to fly R/C airplanes and helicopters, I have that stuff around constantly. I order it from Tower Hobbies in IL, I believe, and store it indefinitely in the freezer outside the shop in the garage.

    For added strength, I have used what is called "Micro-balloons." This stuff reminds me of baking soda. The Super Glue site even says use baking soda for added strength. I even use baking soda when the areas I want to super glue are missing some pieces. Keep you eyes away from the "smoke" in the adhesive curing process. Stings like hell.

    Super glue bonds because of the amino acids in the material. Porous material, like your fingers glue well, although the glue does a better job in non-porous materials that contain some water moisture. It does not work well on things like glass-too non-porous.

    Acetone is the remover. If you get glue where it should not be, you can use acetone to remove it, but then Acetone can remove other stuff too.

    When I was involved in a company that made all of Weathergy's fancy wood stocks, we used super glue and walnut dust to fill the pores in the wood prior to adding the finish. We had the people use rubber gloves.

    Now that's a politicians answer to a simple question.

    Whiz
     
  13. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

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    Since I also used to build and fly RC airplanes and helicopters, I have worked with cyanoacrylate extensively. Whiz is mostly correct, but I want to add a few other things. The thin CA works best with wood that is porous. Balsa wood meets that criteria, but walnut and similar woods, not so much. It works by capillary action. If you have a crack that you can separate slightly, you can use the thicker CA and let it run down into the crack. I'd stay away from micro-balloons. They don't really add strength, just body and may prevent the wood surfaces from completely mating. Also, stay away from baking soda. It's purpose is to "set-off" the CA and create an instant bond. You want a little extra time to allow the CA to flow into the crack. Baking soda will also create a residue that is impossible to remove.

    The biggest challenge using CA is too avoid getting any of it on the surface of the wood. If you get it on the finish, there is no good way to get it off.
    Once the CA has set, the glue joint will be stronger than the wood around it. It won't crack there again.
     
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