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coyote loads

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 1ounceload, Feb 1, 2010.

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  1. 1ounceload

    1ounceload TS Member

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    i have gotten into coyote hunting. i need to know which chokes are better for larger shot. I've been told you have a better pattern down range with bigger shot (#4 buck, T-shot, bbb, etc) if you open your chokes up to I.C. or Mod. instead of the full or super fulls. No doubt there has at one time something to this nature has been posted before. If someone knows or tell me where i can get the info, would save me a lot of work and expense. thanks
     
  2. 1ounceload

    1ounceload TS Member

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    Ain't it a thrill captin so see a yote come in to a call? Thanks for info. especially about the barrel length, cause i was wondering about that. I notice Benelli has a good looking, cheap pump out now. cost less than $500 out the door. thinking about getting one. supose to have the stock that absorbed alot of the kick. Trust me that is needed when touching one of those high brass off.
     
  3. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Flambeau has an ad in the Feb 2010 Outdoor life that claims a choke they sell will put 100% of steel or lead, BB's up to 00 buck, in a 30 inch circle at 80 yards.

    Sounds a little unbelievable to this old hunter.
     
  4. Savage99Stan

    Savage99Stan Active Member

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    I think the Flambeau ad forgets to mention that you need a 79 yard long barrel to do it.
     
  5. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    I shot a lot of coyotes with a 30 inch full choked Win.24 with #2s! Instant lights out. Hap
     
  6. Doug Brown

    Doug Brown Well-Known Member

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    Copper coated lead BB's, thru an extra full choke, is the best medicine to use.
     
  7. 1ounceload

    1ounceload TS Member

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    I did go to Flambeau web site. Their chokes for turkey went from .560 to .675 and recommended #4 to #71/2, In what they called dog or hound chokes they were all .710 shot size recommended was i believe #2 to #00. By this they are saying the choke should be opened up. Maybe so i don't know. guess I'll have to roll up my sleeves and find what works for me, right?
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    There's only one way to know what load works with your gun and chokes at what range, and that's by doing your own pattern testing.

    My favorite coyote load is Federal Premium 3" #4 Buck through a super full turkey choke. I'm getting a pattern that will lace a coyote from nose to rump at 50 yards. My pattern is not being blown with this tight of a choke. Your mileage may vary.

    Simply switching to the cheaper Federal regular 3" #4 buck loads will cost 10 yards in the above pattern. Quality of shot makes a big difference. And this is why some people have to use more open chokes - cheap, soft shot results in blown patterns with tighter chokes.

    I do not care for the 2-3/4" buckshot loads. In #4 Buck, they only have 27 pellets vs 41 for the 3" loads. This thins the pattern considerably and shortens the range even more.

    00 Bucks is OK for up close, but I've found beyond 30 yards that the pattern is thinning to the point where it is possible to get only one or two pellets on a small coyote. I also open the choke up as well, because the larger buck sizes are too large for turkey chokes. I only use 00 Buck when deer hunting with a shotgun. First shell is 00 Buck, the rest are slugs. In dense brush I use a shotgun with slugs, but the 00 Buck is for the possibility of jumping a coyote. I'd rather have the first shell as #4 Buck, but that's not legal for deer here.

    Steel T's and BBB's are best if you have to use steel. They're not the easiest to find, though, and BB's are more common. Full choke can be used, but the tube better be rated for steel. Some are using even tighter chokes. I have not tried them in chokes tighter than full. They pattern well, but the question is how much energy do they retain at a given range compared to lead? In theory, steel shot should pattern much better than any lead shot because it cannot be compressed and distorted. On the other hand, the big question is, just how tight of a choke can large steel shot pass through without tearing the choke tube out of the barrel? I'd rather use the lead versions of these shot sizes, but large lead shot loads are not easy to find because of the restriction on lead for waterfowling.

    Heavi-Shot et al.... I found these work great for turkey loads, but I got sticker shot for coyote loads, up to $3 a shell. I'll use lead until forced to try these, and maybe even steel first. I've also switched back to lead for turkey shells, because of cost.

    My feeling on claims of 70 and 80 yard coyote kills is this.... Unless you're shooting 10ga or 3.5" 12ga, you're not going to put enough pellets out to have enough pattern density, and even then pellet energy is dropping off rapidly. I think sheer luck plays a much bigger factor at these ranges than people are willing to admit to. After around 60 yards a rifle is a much better tool for coyotes. Shotguns are at their best up close in dense brush and undergrowth. The only reason to sub a shotgun for a rifle when a rifle does a better job is because of firearms restrictions during some seasons. But boy oh boy, a shotgun works great under the right conditions. At close range it's easier to hit with than a rifle, and the coyotes are almost always DRT.
     
  9. ljutic73

    ljutic73 Well-Known Member

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    75 grain Nosler Ballistic Tips goin' 4000fps work real good....
     
  10. Dr.Longshot

    Dr.Longshot Banned Banned

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    Pat Ireland's ringed shot gun shells, good tight pattern to 70 yards w/8s.

    I know personally that it works, I ringed a new AA in the 70s and shot at a large rope hanging from a tree a very long, long distance, and said I am shooting at the knot at the end of the rope.

    I was dazzled I acyually hit it and it jumped up and down, what a lucky shot.

    Performed this fete at a gun club Northeast Of Delaware, it made a noise going thru the air almost like a whistle.

    Ring a shell and it comes out the Bbl like a slug. I have seen it and done it.


    Gary Bryant
    Dr.longshot
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    In the coyote drives of a few years ago in Kansas and Oklahoma, OO buck was the largest shot allowed. Three drives a day, each 4 sections, would result in about 300 dead coyotes and a lot of lunch money for the country church that organized the drive. I quit hunting them after I found out how useful they can be around the farm.

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Pat:

    Where in Kansas did the average of 25 coyotes per section killed, in a drive over an average of three drives covering 4 sections of land each, happen? I have lived in central Kansas for three quarters of a century, and we owned ground where they had those coyote drives. WOW
     
  13. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    SE Kansas and NE Oklahoma around 1957 through 1962. The 300 number is from my memory and a 15 year old kid can be impresses easily. Several trucks were filled with Coyotes.

    Pat Ireland
     
  14. OldRemFan

    OldRemFan Member

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    Yea, memory is a fickle thing.
     
  15. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    #4 Buck
     
  16. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    I would like to hear more about Pat ringing shells. I never heard of it before and I am almost 68 years old
     
  17. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I will give you a hint. It requires a sharp knife and a cut just above the wad. Lots of stuff, including the wall of the hull comes out as a single unit.

    Pat Ireland
     
  18. brent375hh

    brent375hh TS Member

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    Pat,

    My family is from Osage county KS. I never heard anyone talk about how useful they can be around the farm. What did they do useful for you?
     
  19. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Brent- Years ago by early Spring I had a large chest freezer in the garage packed full of Doves, Rabbits, Squirrels, Quail, Ducks and Pheasants. A storm cane through (small funnel in the storm) and we were without electricity for 9 days. It got very warm. The stuff in the freezer was a spoiled soupy mess. I just left the freezer lid up and 6-9 Coyotes fed well for about a week. They left the freezer spotless. I thanked them and did not shoot any more, well not too many more. I also enjoyed listening to them yell at night. Nice way to go to sleep.

    Pat Ireland
     
  20. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    I think you might be better off with a 257 Roberts.
     
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