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coyote calling

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by AAtrap, Mar 21, 2008.

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  1. AAtrap

    AAtrap Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    I call with hand call. Rabbit in distress. Would say about 50yds. away depending on the terrain you are calling in.

    The gun you have will work just fine, but you'd better put a different scope on it. I use a fixed 4 or 6. I have the same set-up that you have, but I use it for punching holes in paper off a bench or shooting P-dogs with a bipod installed. Have fun. It's addictive. Steve
     
  2. ClaySmoke

    ClaySmoke Member

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    Gary, I do a lot of coyote calling here in Missouri and can offer you some pointers. First and foremost, watch the wind direction. Never setup where the wind in blowing your scent into where the coyotes are likely going to come out of. I usually set up in sparse grass openings tucked in under a tree that offers dark shadows, this helps to break up your outline and also movement to get in position for the shot. I typically set the speaker on my caller up anywhere from right next to me out to about 20 feet in front of me. By placing the speaker out away from you, you take the focus of the coyote off of you and onto the speaker. Start out at about 1/4 to 1/3 volume in case something is close, then after a couple minutes you can increase the sound up to about 3/4. I usually play it for a couple minutes then off for a couple minutes, etc. The entire stand for coyotes should only last about 20 minutes. 95% of all the coyotes I've ever called in were within about 4 minutes. As for calls, use any distress call that hasn't been played to death in your area. The most popular sound is a cottontail distress, avoid it. I like to use jackrabbit distress(don't worry that there aren't jackrabbits in your area, coyotes don't care) and also rodent and bird distress calls. The only other tip I can give you is to turn your 24x scope down as low as it goes, typically you won't have several hundred yard shots, they will instead run right in on you and that requires quick target acqusition. If you have any more questions, head over to www.predatormastersforums.com and we'd be happy to help. Garrett
     
  3. Hooked

    Hooked Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    gmag, check out Varmint Al's website above. He's got MP3s of various coyote calls and plans on how to build an electronic call for less than $50. I built one using his instructions and with his recordings, was able to call in and bag a few coyotes. I've taken them with everything from a 17HMR to a 204 Ruger (my favorite) and am currently having a 260 Rem built for the really long stuff. Wish I had the room to shoot more often.

    Brian
     
  4. darr

    darr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
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    I hunt with a predator fanatic.Since last march he has shot over 130 coyotes,bobcats and foxes all together.When I hunt with him he sets up in heavy cover down wind from the area he thinks the dogs will come from.He sets about 20 yards from the speaker with a 10 gauge and 2.25oz of bbs.He puts me up high where I can see open spots skirting the heavy cover with a rifle.He plays the caller loud and they usually come in within 5 minutes.He gets way more shots with the shotgun than I do with the rifle.He literally has to defend the call.But nothing is funner than popping one out there about 250 yards who has stopped to try and figure out what is going on.If you haven't called anything within 15 minutes move about 2 miles and set up again.Have fun.

    Darr
     
  5. buddy123

    buddy123 Guest

    Is there any time of day which seems to be more productive than other times?
    For example, is early morning better than late afternoon?
    Thanks,
    Pete
     
  6. ClaySmoke

    ClaySmoke Member

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    In order from best to worst by my findings...early morning, late evening and if it's really cloudy or snowing then hunt all day. Garrett
     
  7. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    4,830
    Go to PREDATORMASTERS.com ON THE INTERNET
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Clay Smoke sums it up pretty dang well.<br>
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    I'm using the Johnny Stewart Digital Preymaster. Mine is the earlier unit, still available, that's hard wired between the calling unit and the speaker. The first thing I did was make an extension speaker cord to get the unit a bit further out from me. Because I use a shotgun, I usually put the unit 20 to 30 yards in front of me. I aim the speaker in the direction I believe the coyotes will come from. Also cover the unit up with brush or grass, whatever is nearby. This unit plays one interchangable card, which has four sounds on the card. Two of these sounds can be played at the same time. I start with default volume, and after a couple of minutes, I'll raise it up. If you have a nearby coyote, full volume right off the bat can sometimes spook them. I've never had the batteries run dead in the firld, but it's a smart move to carry a stick of batteries in your vehicle. I also bought a cheap camera flash unit and will "flash" the display while in the vehicle for dusk and dark. This activates the glow in the dark buttons and lettering faster and quicker than leaving the unit in the sunlight. For carrying, I found the mil spec MOLLE medical bag works well. One pocket holds my mouth calls, one holds the caller unit and the digital cards, and the large compartment holds the speaker and all the wire. I just sling it over my shoulder.<br>
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    [​IMG]<br>
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    This is the wireless unit. It wasn't available when I bought the wired unit. I'm thinking about upgrading to it and giving my wired unit to my son. This unit can accept three cards at the same time, giving a choice of 12 sounds. I believe only two can still be mixed, but you can do that between different cards. And of course it's wireless, so you don't have to mess around paying out and retrieving wires. Not a big deal during the day, but at night or in brush that grabs the wire, the wireless is nice. It's also louder than the wired unit, which can help on noisy, windy days in wide open country. I also like the louder volume for crow calling. (We've called crows from a couple of miles away with the old unit.) A drawback is this unit costs a lot more, weighs more, and eats more batteries.<br>
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    Quiver Critter (scroll down the page)<br>
    Quiver Critter on You Tube<br>
    Quiver Critter Windows Media Player video<br>
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    I'm experimenting with the Quiver Critter. This is a battery operated rabbit decoy on a spike. Placed near the speaker, it gives a coyote something to see when he's looking at the source of the sound. I've only tried it a couple of times, and no coyote came in either time. Too soon to tell how it's going to work. I have friends whohave used it, and they say it works well.<br>
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    To expand on what Clay Smoke wrote, depending on the season and the method of getting to the stand, I may stay briefly or I may put some time into it. If you're only going a short ways from the vehicle in fairly open country, then it makes sense to run-n-gun and hit as many stands as possible. If you're having to set up in areas that take time to get into, then I'm not going to give up on them too soon. Particularly during bobcat season. Bobcats are much slower to come in, and far more cautious than any coyote. It can take 45 minutes to an hour to call in a bobcat. And you better have the volume turned down after a while or they'll spook. Where legal, various birds will come in as well.<br>
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    There's an old indian saying that goes like this: "A leaf fell from a tree in the forest. The eagle saw it. The deer heard it. The bear smelled it. The coyote did all three." You must be motionless, you must not make noise (other than the call), and you must not give off odors.<br>
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    I wear camo when coyote hunting. Everything is camo. Gun, clothes, head mask, gloves, etc. Some people will tell you camo is not required. This is true to a point. I've called and shot coyotes wearing blue jeans and a buckskin jacket, with my face uncovered. One author of a coyote hunting book wore a Santa suit just to prove the point. But, I've found the lack of camo generally restricts you to the young and dumb coyotes that have recently been kicked out of the den, and the hungry winter coyotes that so desperate for a meal they throw caution to the wind. For the old, wiser, educated coyotes, you need all the help you can get.<br>
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    Noise is pretty self explanatory. You see some pro's whispering on coyote hunting tapes and DVD's. You can get away with it if your whisper is below the threshold of the wind and other noises. But on a dead calm day with no ambient noise, you'll usually give yourself away. I've seen coyotes instantly go from standing or walking to flat out emergency flank speed simply because a safety was flipped off. Car doors are another big no-no. It's amazing how often you'll see coyote hunters slam the doors of their truck. And loud exhaust systems can alert coyotes as well. I've seen experienced coyotes mousing in fields, ignoring our vehicles. But when you let off the gas and the gear whine changes pitch, they take off like they have JATO rockets strapped to them. They know, from experience, that a change in gear whine and the sound of brakes means an incoming bullet. <br>
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    It's amazing how many hunters will reek of tobacco, sweat, gasoline, and other scents associated with humans and human activity. I knew a guy who had bad luck getting coyotes. Turns out he was taking a leak by where he was hunting so he wouldn't have to once he started calling. In some areas, with older, wiser coyotes, a masking scent works well. The best (and foulest) is skunk essence. Some coyote hunters will tie a shoelace to equipment and dip it in the essence. I won't. I take q-tips and dip one end into the essence, and set it out on the ground near me, and bury it when we leave (I don't litter). Doe urine can work well too when using fawn bleat calls. Masking scents are not needed for the younger, dumber coyotes.<br>
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    One thing that can greatly increase the odds of getting a coyote is a partner. It's amazing how many times a coyote will circle you, and come up on your blind side, even if you've observed the wind and have set up accordingly. I've had coyotes come up a few feet behind me. That happened the first time I took my 1187 out coyoting. Had one coome up right behind me. Unfortunately for him, he stepped on a small twig. I whirled and gunned him. A friend calling at night had a wet nose planted on the back of his neck. He jumped up screaming and dropped his gun. He's never been night hunting again. A partner facing backwards to you can work very well to your mutual benefit.<br>
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    Electronic callers are nice, but don't ever go coyoting without mouth calls. My favorites are the Sceery combo sets, like the one with a small rodent, cottontail and jackrabbit calls. I put them on a common necklace, along with a small coyote howler. Get a set, learn to use them, and carry them. In fact, the rodent call or a mouse squeaker works well with partners. The caller or caller operator uses it to signal when he is done calling by giving three short blips. This tells everyone that in one minute, you are breaking cover. If they have a coyote in sight, they have one minute to try to take it before you spook it. Or they can try to use their call to coax it in, in which case everyone sits still and waits.<br>
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    If you shoot a coyote, and he goes down DO NOT stop calling and break cover. More may be on the way in. It's not logical, but sometimes gunfire attracts other coyotes, especially when one yelps a lot. Maybe it's like motorists slowing down to look at a wreck or something. Just sit still and observe for a short while.<br>
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    Books and videos. There are a lot of predator hunting books. "Predator Calling with Gerry Blair" ISBN 0-87341-359-8 is one of the better ones. Another good one is "Predator Hunting" by Rom Spomer ISBN 1-58011-196-3. As for DVD's, I like the "Coming to the Call" series by Byron South, followed by the "Calling All Coyotes" series by Randy Anderson. Johnny Stewart also has a series called "Operation Predator" that's good, though I prefer the other two over it. If you can legally night hunt, "Hunting the Night Shift: Predators" with Randy Watson and Randy Buker is good. There are some coyote videos that make use of hunting dogs to decoy coyotes in. I accidentally bought one. It's the least useful of all the DVD's out there.<br>
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    There is no ideal firearm for hunting coyotes. A shotgun is not effective beyond roughly 50 yards, and a rifle can be less effective than a shotgun for close range heavy cover. If you hunt enough, you'll want to try handguns. The .357 Magnum runs out of accuracy before it runs out of power. Others run out of power before they run out of accuracy. Many use the Thompson Contender. It's a fine choice. I prefer multiple shots for multiple coyotes, so I went with a Kel-Tec PLR-16, which is a semi-auto .223 handgun. Any of the centerfire hands are loud, but especially those chambering centerfire rifle rounds. I have not taken my Kel-Tec coyote hunting yet, because I ned to purchase a set of electronic muffs to use it. (I am taking it on a varmint trip shortly, though). One thing I can tell you about rifles - never sight them in for a 100 yard zero. I'll sight in a .223 about 2" high at 100 yards. This extends my point blank range. Typical zero ranges are 175 to 250 yards, depending on cartridge, bullet and rifle. My 25-06, with 100 grainers, is sighted in at 260 yards. I do not have to hold off fur on a coyote out to 300 yards. You'll need to find out the velocity of your load and the ballistic coefficient of the bullet, and use a ballistics calculator to arrive at your ideal sight in range. As far as equipment in general, don't let it get to be an equipment race. If your deer rifle is a tack driver, and you don't care about pelts, start with it. In fact, one of the most "bloodied" coyote rifles I've ever seen was an old Browning BLR lever gun in 243 with an old Weaver scope on it, wrapped in camo tape. The man who owned it taught me to coyote hunt.<br>
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    One last word of encouragement. If you get skunked the first few times out, don't give up. I'll bet the odds were 3 out of 4 that you had a coyote respond, but you simply did not see him before he made you.
     
  9. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    buddy123, "Is there any time of day which seems to be more productive than other times? For example, is early morning better than late afternoon? Thanks, Pete"<br>
    <br>
    In my experience, no, at least not for wide open rural and wild areas, with the exception of very early morning along logging and access roads. Especially in country with grouse and rabbits. Coyotes will "road patrol" hoping to catch something in or alongside the road. Let your guide be coyote prints and especially scat for determining a good place. If there is a lot of scat, it means coyotes are using it as a main corridor. The trick is to figure out when they're using it. Often these are areas where you can sit just off the intersection of two roads and ambush them. In some areas, the local rodents may be quite active around dusk. That can be a good time to set up as well. But most coyotes that I've shot or have seen shot were in the middle of the day. It just worked out that way.<br>
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    For urban areas, yes, time of day matters greatly. I've found coyotes generally are quite shy during the day. They've been pressured by man and dogs to go nocturnal. Night hunting by a full moon works well.<br>
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    But this takes a back seat to weather. The best times are the day after a heavy rain or snow storm. They're hungry, and they're looking for a meal to stop their bellies from growling. Some get overly incautious.
     
  10. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Another book: "Coyote Hunting - The Complete Book: From Head to Tail" by Paul Simonski ISBN 0-912299-59-2. This is an older book, as it shows analog callers (cassette), but the info is still valid.
     
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