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cost of five stand

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by duke76, Sep 13, 2007.

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  1. duke76

    duke76 Member

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    What is the going rate for shooting five stand, 25 shots?
     
  2. bkms

    bkms Member

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    8 bucks a round in most of Mississippi unless you are a member of a club and then i have seen it around 6.50 Bob...
     
  3. yvonne

    yvonne Banned User Banned

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    $5 for members and guests at my club! Unless you're a member of the Shotgun Committee (I am!) $4.00 per round for 25! What a deal!
     
  4. ec90t

    ec90t Guest

    $5 is the going rate in my neck of the woods.

    ec90t
     
  5. dzneff

    dzneff Member

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    The cost for 5-stand at our club (AZ) is $3.00 per round when a Club member purchases 10 shoot tickets, $3.50 per round for Club members, and $4.50 per round for nonmembers.

    Dennis
     
  6. Joe Potosky

    Joe Potosky Well-Known Member

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    A few variables on cost versus skeet and trap.

    Show targets from each machine.

    If you have machine problems on doubles or report pairs your throwing excess targets. Not uncommon...

    Some clubs have machines that throw speciality targets and they cost more per case.

    Cost more to power the field as your running anywhere from 5 to 12 machines.

    We have one club in this region that runs 12 machines, sometimes a few more.

    More spare parts required.

    So, the going rate depends on all the above...

    Some clubs have not done the math and in many cases do not charge enough.
     
  7. Justin L.

    Justin L. Member

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    I was at a sporting clays shoot one day and they had the 5-stand running. I thought I'd go over and try it, they charged me $10 for 15 targets! Yep, 15 targets. They were giving prizes out, though, and I ended up winning the event and getting 200 free sporting clays targets (at a place that charges $60 a hundred), so that took away the sticker shock for a while...but at 1st I thought they were crazy...
     
  8. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    $10 members, $12 non-members for 50 targets (25 pair presentations). And ours is more like a seven stand now, with a couple of towers and all sorts of goodies (Portland Gun Club).
     
  9. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    $2.00/25 for members at the club I belong to in North Georgia. A very nice club with a great price on memberships & target cost.

    i_shoot
     
  10. bgf

    bgf Active Member

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    Location:
    Prescott Valley, Arizona
    agking,

    We have 8 (eight) machines on our 5 stand field...1 (one) on each of our trap fields. Which do you think costs more in maintenance?

    Bernie
     
  11. i_shoot

    i_shoot Member

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    It's a private club so they are not looking for making money but rather pay expenses. Guests are charged a $5 visitor fee plus $3/25

    Hope this answers your question.

    i_shoot
     
  12. KiloMike

    KiloMike TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2007
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    I'm pretty new to shotgunning (1 month!) but I've been doing math for many years. :)


    To my unknowing mind, if you break the maintenance fees down to $$$/25 targets/per machine, I don't think you would see a huge difference in maintenance costs. On a trap field, one trap throws all 25 targets. Bernie, on the 5 stand field you mentioned, you have 8 machines throwing 25 targets. It seems like on average, a 5 stand machine gets 1/8 of the work per 25 target round than a machine throwing trap. Cost of special targets aside (good point, Pat) maintenance costs would balance out, wouldn't they?


    So what am I missing?


    Kevin
    (Just trying to understand all aspects of my new addiction!)
     
  13. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    A trapshooter can be serviced by one trap machine.<br>
    <br>
    For sporting clays, you need several machines per shooter, and some of these are specialty machines. I've lost count, but we had something like four or five automatics and four hand sets.<br>
    <br>
    From a labor standpoint, sporting clays almost always requires a puller. Trap can be run with voice releases.<br>
    <br>
    Trap can accomodate up to five shooters at a time. Sporting clays can accomodate a lot more, but usually we get small groups, so there is no real offset here.<br>
    <br>
    Most trap clubs have long paid off their trap houses. Sporting clays installations are often newer, so while there is no trap house per se, we do have a couple of towers, the stands, a stand that's a small tower, etc.<br>
    <br>
    A round of trap is 25 clays, and for non-members it costs $4. A round of sporting clays is $10 for club members, and $12 for non-club members. So for the same amount of clays, our sporting clays costs an extra $2 to $4. That money goes for three things - to pay the extra puller, to purchase specialty clays (which cost more than trap clays), and to purchase more equipment to expand the sporting clays field.<br>
    <br>
    My club initially invested in a sporting clays setup that failed. It was a package deal by a third party. It was not very interesting, and had way too much overhead. It's to the credit of our directors and members (trapshooters) that they agreed to fund a second chance at another sporting clays field. Our sporting clays field is now self-sufficient. Indeed, on some days, it brings in much more revenue than the trap fields. This is especially true when other trap clubs in the area have sanctioned events. We also get a good chunk of change from groups using the sporting clays field, like Ducks Unlimited, and some corporates. It's also interesting how many trapshooters shoot sporting clays. Some like the more open atmosphere and lack of a squad pace (you call for clays at your own pace). And, unlike trap where you can only have a slight difference in ability (newbies at 16 yard don't mix with 27 yarders at the same time), in sporting clays our pullers can easily lower the difficulty or ratchet it up for the more experienced. I've done this when I've filled in as a puller. For example, when hand setting two clays, I'll put them both rightside up for the newbies, one up and one down for the more experienced, and both down for the experts. An unside down clays drops like a stone, so this greatly increases the skill level when both are upside down.<br>
    <br>
    I also feel sporting clays is a lot more like hunting than trap or skeet. And definitely not as repetitious. Most people who gravitate to sporting clays do so not because of skill level, but that they find sporting clays to be much more interesting. In my case, I shot trap to learn how to shoot a shotgun, with the goal of hunting in mind. I have no interest in shooting trap competitively. In fact, I have no interest in shooting sporting clays competitively either. I just prefer sporting clays because it's more interesting due to a variety of presentations, and it's more like hunting. That should not, under any circumstances, be taken as a slam against trap. The two are completely different shotgun sports and are unique in their own ways.
     
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