1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Correct way to move an adjustible comb?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Prescott Gene, Jul 29, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Prescott Gene

    Prescott Gene Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    142
    I don't know if you are trolling but the bait looks pretty good, so I will bite!

    Do you remember the Chris Farley(?) movie that had the line "That is going to leave a mark!"? Well, if you are right handed and shoot that setup, you will probably be drawing blood after a few rounds. The front of the comb will come back and slice that cheek open. If anything the comb should be parallel with the bore or the front of the comb should be pushed away from your cheek, just a wee bit.

    Gene
     
  2. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5,482
    Location:
    Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania
    Usually, you can't get the comb back on with the posts misaligned more than a little. Misaligning them makes the distance between them longer than the distance between the holes in the comb. I guess if you enlargened the holes, you could do it but I wonder why anyone would want to.

    Ed
     
  3. hoffman06

    hoffman06 Member

    Joined:
    May 6, 2009
    Messages:
    482
    Location:
    Marcola Oregon
    We build adjustable combs on our Slick Slide recoil systems and have seen shooters set them in every position imaginable but on this one I agree with Gene. I think it will cause trouble after a few rounds. Have you shoot it yet set like that.
    Carey
     
  4. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,332
    Location:
    Shawnee, Kansas, USA
    Sportshot.

    Indeed, Greg Hissem intentionally set up my daughter's adjustable comb exactly this way.

    He even suggested it might be useful to set the back of the comb a tiny bit higher than the front of the comb.

    It relieves a little bit of the recoil to her cheek.

    Is this "correct?"

    Well, if Greg Hissem says to try it, who am I to question it?

    Works for her.
     
  5. Prescott Gene

    Prescott Gene Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2006
    Messages:
    142
    For a lefty, this should work fine. As timb99 said, a bit higher in the rear is okay also. The idea is to get the eye over the top of the barrel. If this is what you need to do to get one bead on top of the other, then that answers the question. Make sure the beads are centered on the rib. I have seen the middle one off to the side a bit. Shoot it on paper and adjust accordingly. Looks don't break targets! If it bothers you, you could probably move the rear over a bit. But gun fit is important, looks aren't.

    Gene
     
  6. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,535
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Sport- My guess is that you need alot of offset at the comb, much the same as I do. Try moving the back over so that its parallel to the front, I think you'll find this to be more appropriate.
     
  7. whiz white

    whiz white Strong Supporter of Trapshooting Banned

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,771
    Location:
    Rapid City SD
    Assuming you are a RH: If the above photo works for your bead alignment and your are RH, you can reverse the comb exactly opposite, because your face only sits on the comb at one spot. A RH shooting the above shown stock will definitely have a sore face.

    You ALWAYS want the comb adjusted such that upon recoil the comb moves AWAY and not INTO your face. This means a RH shooter wants the comb front angled to the right, and conversely so for a LH shooter.

    First thing you want to do is to adjust the comb (for a RH shooter) so the front angles AWAY from your face (FRONT to the RIGHT, REAR to the LEFT). Once you have that done, you can "play" with the entire comb movement to the left or the right, keeping the above angling the same. You don't need much angling either, just enough so your face is not slapped from the front of the comb upon recoil, and if the rear of the comb is a tad higher than the front, this served to prevent face slap. You may not feel the "slap" for a while, until you realize your cheek is sore.

    Next, is height, and this is very subjective. I use a laser device in the barrel, a good laser that is very concentric to the bore. I set the laser to be at the exact spot of-spot a certain distance away. What works for me, will not work for you. I shoot an extremely high gun, particularly for 27 yards, and because I shoot very quickly, I need a higher shooting gun.

    The height of the comb will be a test, retest, retest... thing. You need to go shoot it.

    I'd also recommend that you have someone stand behind you who can see the shot going out there. A good humid, clear day, or evening is great for this. You don't want someone who "thinks" they see the shot, but someone, who HONESTLY sees it. I also have some tracers that are not on the market for this-got them from a manufacturer in Oregon a while back. The standard tracers, just don't work very well.

    As Phil Kiner says, "98% of the shooters shoot under their targets." Remember that the statement "Figure 8" was buried about 10 years ago.

    Hope this helps.

    Whiz White
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.