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Correct blade for chop saw for cutting stocks?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by skeet_man, Feb 6, 2009.

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  1. skeet_man

    skeet_man Well-Known Member

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    Just starting into doing recoil pads for myself (to save $) and friends (for some spare shooting $).

    Cut my 1st stock last night, a ruger rifle stock for my dad. I wrapped it with blue painters tape, marked it, and cut it with my brothers chop saw. Finish on the entrance side was perfect, but the exit side chipped out a little. Luckily, i left it about 1/8" long on purpose, so I can go back and clean it up either with a disc sander or re-cut it.

    I'm thinking the blade on there now probably isn't what I want for cutting stocks, its a 10" 60 tooth general purpose blade.

    Any recommendations on a blade that will give me a better edge finish with no chips on the exit side.

    I've used band saws in the past, and the results were always disappointing, leaving me having to sand a bunch to get the stock back to level and square, the chop saw made the most beautiful cut with no sanding required, the only issue was the aforementioned chipping on the exit side.

    Any help appreciated.
     
  2. docjonsn

    docjonsn TS Member

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    I would use a blade with as many teeth as possible minimum of 80 tooth, 116 would be better. you are not gonna find really good blades at your local hardware store I by mine from Forrest blades but that is what I do for a living, next you want to look at tooth pattern I would probably go with a A T B tooth pattern (alternative tooth bevel) that will give you a very clean cut. and lastly make sure that your saw blade is sharp. you are cutting finished hardwood not MDF (compressed sawdust)
    Pete
     
  3. perazzitms

    perazzitms TS Member

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    High tooth count and move the saw slowly.

    The wood chips because the teeth exit and re-enter an unsupported edge. That's why the bottom chips and the top doesn't. You need to support the wood at the edge. You can put several layers of tape on the bottom edge to build a 'false' bottom edge, or you have to lay the stock in some sort of cradle.
     
  4. bigbore613

    bigbore613 Active Member

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    If you are serious about the best , get a Freud LU85 80 tooth in 10 inch or 96 tooth in 12 inch. This is no place to save money. Aproximately $90 to $125 . Jeff
     
  5. otnot

    otnot Active Member

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    I have always just scored the cut line before cutting.
     
  6. Jon Reitz

    Jon Reitz Well-Known Member

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    I bit the bullet a while back and bought a Freud LU85R012 Perma-SHIELD® 12" 96 tooth. Very pricey but it does an amazing job. Then last weekend I managed to chop off a tiny brad I didn't see that was imbedded in a piece of oak ....@#$%&*.
     
  7. docjonsn

    docjonsn TS Member

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    send it to Forrest the do the best blade sharping around.
    and Jim is a realy nice guy
    http://www.forrestblades.com/
    I have been sending them my blades to sharpen for years
    Pete
     
  8. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    skeet, I found a Rigid brand 90 tooth 10" blade at Home Depot. Thats a lot of teeth in 10" diameter. Using the blue tape and bringing it down and through the cut slowly has worked well for me with no splintering.

    John Ertel
     
  9. 320090T

    320090T Well-Known Member

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    I tape them up and cut on a bandsaw using the fence, never had any trouble with chipping or uneven cuts. You have to support the reciever end.
     
  10. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I cut hundreds of them every year, using a band saw and then sanding them smooth and to the proper pitch. I used to use a cut off saw but it had a 5 degree negative pitch blade, which made a perfectly smooth cut. If you ask your woodworking supply dealer, I'm sure they'll give you guidance.

    Ed Yanchok
     
  11. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    As mentioned in all posts above 80 to 120 tooth blade, one with a heavy plate, avoid those thin kerf blades as they tend to wobble a little unless you use larger than average stabilizers' cut slowly keep sharp use only for your stock cutting and take it to a GOOD saw sharpener and have him side grind it, if he can't or asks whats side grinding find another sharpener. Good luck..Ross Puls owner of Ross' sharpening service.
     
  12. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Band saw is the only way to go.
     
  13. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

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    dido on the STOCK ONLY blade. I marked mine, and is stored away from the general public.
     
  14. Customstox

    Customstox Member

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    Ian, I do one of 2 things to make that cut. I use a chop saw and dress it down on a stationary belt sander or I use a Japanese pull saw. The pull saw make a very neat fine cut but you have to line out the cut on both sides and start the cut on both sides and line it up at the top and use the partial cut on the other side to guide the saw. I only do that when I am in a position of having to make just one cut and do not have any excess wood to dress down.
     
  15. X Trap 2

    X Trap 2 TS Member

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    I have used my 10 inch, 60 tooth, carbide blade with no problems. I wrap the cut line with regular 2 inch masking tape and put it on tight and really press it down. I then mark on the tape where I want to cut and the angle. I then wrap the stock in a hand towel taped to the stock so it can not move and also not to get any marks on it. I set the pitch or angle by turning the saw as necessary and lock it down.I get my right angle square and square the butt and shim the stock as required to get it square. I cut in the middle of the tape and I make my cut real slow. Now, I have only done 3 stocks but all came out great. Ray
     
  16. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    I've had good results with a 10", 200 tooth "plywood" blade and 3 or 4 wraps of black plastic electrical tape around the stock where the cut will be made.

    John C. Saubak
     
  17. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Like Ed Y. I always used a blade with a slight negative pitch. I would also score all around the stock and score it deeper on the bottom edge. I have used a chop saw, band saw, table saw and a miter box, all with equal effectiveness.

    I would use rags, paper, cardboard, wood blocks and tape to get the butt square with the blade then slide the stock into place and turn on the saw. Both of my index fingers are rounded off a little on the thumb side. That happens when you run a cabinet shop for several years.

    Pat Ireland
     
  18. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    A good blade with a blade stabilizer kit installed and you're good to go. A stabilizer kit is basically 2 pieces of steel that fit on either side of your blade to keep it more fixed and steady.
     
  19. Trapshooter

    Trapshooter Well-Known Member

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    I use a Freud LU85 80 tooth 10" blade and get perfect cuts. Todd
     
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