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Content of Your Wallet - Emergency Med Info

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Recoil Sissy, Apr 18, 2011.

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  1. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    Messrs. Gene Batchelar and Phil Berkowitz both have active threads this morning. One concerns the content of one's wallet. The other concerns heat induced medical emergencies. Those topics prompted this thread.

    ----------------


    If someone opens my wallet, the first thing they'll find is a folded slip of paper listing emergency information. That one little sheet includes:

    - The wife's name and complete contact information (personal & work) where she can be reached 24/7.

    - The name and contact info for my general practioner.

    - A complete list of prescription meds - including dosage.

    Here's why I carry it at all times....

    Once upon a time I worked for a company that employed staff attorneys. One was a bachlelor in his mid twenties. By all accounts this kid was quite the ladies man but otherwise a bit of a loner.

    One Friday after work he drove four hours to watch a major league baseball game. At the stadium he either slipped or tripped and fell backwards down some stairs. The back of his skull slammed onto a concrete floor causing severe brain trauma. He was of course, whisked off to a hospital where emergency care was provided.

    Here's the rub. This kid's name is Johnson. He lived by himself (no roommate, wife, or steady girlfriend) in a community of 100,000. His wallet contained typical stuff but no emergency contact info. It took authorities nearly three days to locate his parents. In the meantime additional medical procedures that COULD have been done weren't. They involved significant risks medical providers wouldn't assume without authorization from the family.

    This once very bright and talented kid was severely damaged. He will never again be capable of independent living or holding a job.

    Maybe his brain couldn't have been saved. Maybe it didn't matter that treatment was delayed because of the time it took to locate his family. The point is: he never got the chance.

    So... I don't ever expect to be incompacitated by accident or medical emergency. However, if I am, anyone that looks in my wallet (cops, EMTs, emergency room personnel, etc.) will find all the emergency contact data and medical information they will need.

    I sincerely suggest everyone carry emergency info. Someday YOU may be the one needing emergency care that only your spouse or family can authorize.

    Sincerely,

    sissy
     
  2. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    There are some hitches with carrying emergency med info that I've run into.

    I do carry the written version, laminated, in the picture window of my wallet. That works OK if you still have your wallet when they need it and somebody takes the time at the scene to search through it for med ID. Keep it updated!

    I also carry a small USB computer flash drive marked "Medical" attached to my car keys and a smaller one with a blue hex cross taped to it around my neck ala dog tag when I travel. It contains an extensive medical profile: blood type, chronic and acute conditions, native language, meds and doses, allergies, surgeries, physicians, contacts... everything.

    I've run into a couple of situations where nobody would read the dog tag. Hospitals are afraid that you'll infect their system and doctors' offices may not have computers capable of reading flash drives. The one hope seems to be that the EMTs in the ambulance (if there is one) have a laptop that can read a .txt file on a flash drive. These things are for sale commercially and they seem like a good idea at the time. I'll keep mine anyway.
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    MK
     
  3. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Both very good ideas. I however would lean more towards the simple piece of paper maybe lamintaed. Maybe both would be best. Alot of hospitals are slow to update equipment. While the flash drive is certainly nothing new, it may not be the easiest for all hospitals. My wife is an RN and has worked at numerous well known hospitals that are still mostly still paper records. Just say'n................
     
  4. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    Here is another way for you to carry an emergency number.

    In your cell phone contacts, make an entry for I.C.E or just ICE. I'm told this stands for "In Case of Emergency" to an EMT or a police officer.

    Then add the number of the one person you can count on. Be it your wife's number or your kids or whomever. It is just one little thing you can do to help yourself out.

    As noted in one of the story's above, the faster they can get to someone who knows you and your medical history, the better off you will be.

    Hauxfan!
     
  5. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    My new basic Verizon Samsung SCH-u550 has an emergency contact directory that permanently heads the contact list. Adding the appropriate entries to the emergency list also turns the entry red in the contact list.

    MK
     
  6. mikkeeh

    mikkeeh Active Member

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    I've worked as a paramedic for 25 years. The flash drive idea sounds good....but isn't realistic. In an emergency situation ie. cardiac arrest, severe stroke etc. the one or two paramedics in the back of the truck have their hands full taking care of the patient...no time to play with computers and memory cards.

    The wallet info is good.......don't forget about drug allergies.

    Congrats for thinking ahead tho!
     
  7. smsnyder

    smsnyder Well-Known Member

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    I carry a military records card. All they need to do is call va for my health records.
     
  8. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

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    I'll give you one more item to consider carrying... as a life insurance broker, I have a few clients (4 men) who have unusual medical histories. Specifically, they have abnormal-looking, normal EKGs...

    One cardiologist recommended to one client that they carry a laminated copy of their "normal" EKG in their wallet. I then made the recommendation to the other three that they do the same - their respective cardiologists confirmed the recommendation.

    If one is unable to respond, it might just make a difference... and avoid having to open you up...

    regards,

    Jay Spitz
     
  9. Unknown1

    Unknown1 Well-Known Member

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    <blockquote>"...In an emergency situation ie. cardiac arrest, severe stroke etc. the one or two paramedics in the back of the truck have their hands full taking care of the patient...no time to play with computers and memory cards."</blockquote>Mikeeh...

    I did give that consideration which is why I carry the hard copy in my wallet. I figure that if the poo is hitting the propeller and the EMT sees the flash drive, it's their choice whether to fiddle with any medical ID at that time or not. If the situation is not critical and I'm stable but not responsive it gives them access to information they wouldn't have otherwise. Just a backup... in case!

    MK
     
  10. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    It's not hard to imagine circumstances where one's wallet, cell phone, or flash drive is damaged, lost, or overlooked. There are no guarantees.

    Nevertheless, if the day comes when one of us is in serious trouble, I'm hoping he or she has made a reasonable effort to provide critical data to first responders and medical providers. The time saved may make the difference between a happy ending or tragic end.

    Please protect yourself and those you love.

    sissy
     
  11. TjayE

    TjayE Member

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    TTT for some important information.
     
  12. Surfside6

    Surfside6 TS Member

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    In New York State EMT's are not allowed to touch your wallet without your permission. That is why we use Medic Alert.
     
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