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computer ?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by tracyhunter, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. tracyhunter

    tracyhunter Member

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    I have 2 computers ,one i use,the other i use as a backup.how can i download the every day hard drive on to the spare?kind of like a external hard drive.
     
  2. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

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    I would use a zip drive to transfer info. [usb] Bill
     
  3. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    Do you want easy or hard?

    First, are they hardwired on the same network?

    What operating systems are in both machines - which CPU's and how much RAM?

    Are the hard drives in the two machines the exact same size?

    Are you moving data only - or OS and software? Total back-up each day, or incremental only?

    -----

    Easiest is to actually use an external hard drive to transfer the data between the two machines - it means copying the data twice, but it is fairly easy.

    More complex, but ultimately more hands free is to turn on sharing between the two machines, and then map the drives involved. Third party software can then handle to process.

    You got to give us more info to really guide you through this...
     
  4. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    In case you are talking two Apple computers, all you need is a cable (Firewire is what I use). and booting one of the computers up in Terminal mode.
     
  5. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    pyrdek,

    With Apples it is 'target disk mode' - holding down the 'T' key while starting up... not terminal mode
     
  6. AveragEd

    AveragEd Well-Known Member

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    My desktop PC has two 1TB internal hard drives and I have a 250GB external drive connected to it via a USB cable. Every morning at 7:00, the entire primary hard drive is copied onto the second internal hard drive and the data only - documents, photos and such - is copied onto the external drive. It takes about 18 minutes for the internal drive to copy itself and four minutes for the data-only backup with dual 2.8GB processors using Microsoft Backup, which came with my Operating System (64-bit Windows 7 Home Premium Edition) and may come with all the others, too.

    Trust me, it's easy to set up or I couldn't do it!

    Ed
     
  7. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    I stand corrected. It was called terminal mode a number of years ago in some of the information we had to use to set things up and I still revert to that old language.
     
  8. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    pyrdek,

    There still is a terminal function in the Macs (under applications > utilities > terminal). It allows direct access to the UNIX level of the OS. Similar function to command prompt for PC's.
     
  9. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    Yes I know about Terminal. Go back to OS 8 or 9 and try to find it. Bet you can't. What is now called Target Mode started off way back when it was first introduced (maybe in Beta OS 10.0 named Alaska Bear or Bear or something like that) called "Terminal mode" in some descriptions since it allowed the "remote" computer to act as an external data acquisition device. I do recall when it came out, it was most often used here as a way to clone a lab full of computers before SIU or Deploy Studio were even known about. Going back 12 or 13 years in history may have dulled some of the fine points and maybe it was a slightly different version. As I recall, the Beta was made available back about 2000 with a public release maybe a year later. Back then there was not a lot of publicly available info and some of the names were more commonly used terms in what was available and not the actual Apple provided names.

    The Terminal app now is indeed a way to use, and even write, Unix code which greatly extends the capabilities of the computer. It is about the easiest way you can get your computer to use defaults and do things that Apple did not set up. I do use it frequently.

    In case anyone is interested, here is a link to many of the Apple useable command line instructions Click Here . Note, this is not for the faint of heart. If you do not use some of these commands properly, you can cause yourself a lot of trouble. Terminal can bypass some of the things Apple's system does to protect itself. Before anyone tries them, you might want to be sure to have a known good full backup of your system.
     
  10. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    pyrddek,

    Your third paragraph says it all.

    I love terminal - am scared to death of it...

    The "Pre-10" OS's for the Macs were not Unix based.

    Still waiting to see the new '11.'
     
  11. tracyhunter

    tracyhunter Member

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    I think this is way over my head so i will leave it to computer man in town.thank you all for your help.
     
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