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computer ?

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by tracyhunter, Oct 5, 2011.

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  1. tracyhunter

    tracyhunter Member

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    my computer got hit by lighting and is shot. i have another one but would like to use the info from the hard drive that is on the broken one. can i just change hard drives?
     
  2. mixer

    mixer Well-Known Member

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    I think the HD's are machine and perhaps operating system specific. The old HD maybe shot from the lightening zap. Find a good comp tech & ask.

    Eric
     
  3. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    The simple answer is "no" - assuming this is a PC and not a MAC.

    Presuming the old HD is not fried you can move the old HD into the new machine as a 'slave' drive - you won't be able to boot from it, but you will be able to see the data on it. - cables might be an issue (older machines use IDE cables, newer ones use SATA), but you can get adapters, etc. worse comes to worst you can get an external HD enclosure and attach it via a USB cable.

    The programs will not work either - you will need to install them onto the 'new' HD.
     
  4. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    The answer is MAYBE (in a limited capacity).

    What you want to look for is a hard drive clone program. If you had a Mac I would recommend Carbon Copy Cloner. I don't deal specifically with PCs much anymore but there are cloner programs for those also. One that comes to mind is PC Clone (or maybe it is PC Disk Clone) or something similar. The disk manufacturer of the current hard drive in your blown system might even just have such a clone program available as a downloadable program from their website. Before you jump out of reading here, LOOK AT THE REMAINDER OF THIS MESSAGE.

    One MAJOR consideration is that, unless you take some very specific actions to prevent it (like cloning to a DIFFERENT drive than the one you use to boot the system) cloning will wipe out what is on the drive you are cloning to!

    Look around on the web for drive clone programs for PCs. To use a cloner program, or to try to retrieve any data from the old drive, you will have to be able to have your old drive connect to the new system. This might be by installing it in a new computer, as a slave (as listed above) if the needed connections are available, or using it in a drive enclosure which will provide power and data connection to your new system, or even a simple unit that connects to the old drive (not in an enclosure) and provides power to the drive and a data connection , most often USB2, to the new computer. If you do use this last option be careful to not short out anything on the drive by placing it where some of the visible circuit board might be contacted by something electrically conductive.

    The next thing about cloning is that you have only, at best, a poor shot of being able to actually boot up from the drive. A new system will almost undoubtedly have different drivers for most of the devices which will NOT be fully, or maybe even partially, compatible with your new computer. It may not even be backward compatible with much of the program or operating system software on your old drive. This is especially so if the older system is three or four years, or more, old.

    What you can hope for, AND A CLONE PROGRAM IS NOT NEEDED FOR THIS, is to retrieve the documents, pictures, music, addresses, bookmarks and so forth from the old drive. The programs, OS and other more machine specific files need not be retrieved.

    Now all that is predicated on your current drive still being useable. Depending on exactly what got hit, what the drive was doing at the time of failure and just pure luck, good or bad, your drive, and the information on it, might be completely shot anyway.

    If you are lucky enough to be able to recover your drive, get the data you need but do not figure on using that drive again. It was probably stressed by the hit and would be suspect.

    This leads me to using a saying I tell the students where I work most every semester.

    "There are two types of computer users.
    1. Those who know what the term "BACKUP" means and do it and,

    2.Those who at some point in time will wish they did!"
     
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