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Computer Warning

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by bigdogtx, Sep 17, 2010.

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  1. bigdogtx

    bigdogtx Well-Known Member

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    My laptop's hard drive just got a virus called a rogue and I now get to re-format my hard drive. Would love to find those little wimps that think up all this crap.

    My warning is this: I had a pop-up which looked like my virus protector and told me that I had some "malware" (bad crap as well). Anyway the name was "Peak Performance 2010". There were several others and it sounded like a good name. Talking to my computer guru and he knew all about this one and some of the other names that are out there.

    Luckily I only downloaded the "free" one. When it had finished "scanning" for viruses, it came back that I needed a "hereutic" type of fix for $99. I didn't buy it and when I tried to close the popup warning that is when I knew I was screwed. Called my tech guy and he remoted in and saw what what he saw, I heard things like, "Oh, that's bad", "Oh, crap", "Hey John, come over and look at this", (guess I was good for some training),,,,Anyway, back on the warning,,,,My tech guy told me that if I had downloaded the "hereutic" one, it has a "keyboard stroke" mirror,,,,which basically meant that it could see when I typed, MY PASSWORDS AND LOGONS FOR MY BANKING ETC.,,,,

    2 words of advice, Watch out for this Peak Performance 2010 and do backups of your computers, especially your pictures. Luckily, I had all my photos of the granddaughters on a thumb drive.

    Good luck, Jim
     
  2. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    A good example why you should always backup your systems and NEVER click on anything you don't recognize. Not even a red X to close it. Use the task manager to close the pop ups. (Ctl Alt Del or right click menu on taskbar) Also, use a good antivirus and malware program and keep them up to date A good firewall is also a plus. If everybody did as we recommend, I would be out of a career fixing these things.
     
  3. Rick (Pa)

    Rick (Pa) TS Member

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    I Had a problim awile ago. Had to reformat. My computer guy told me when a strange antivirus comes on the screen and says you have a virus to fix now he told me to just unplug the computer or it will install itself. and give you the virus. Thats what happened to me.

    Rick
     
  4. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't even have to look strange. Some of these programmers are clever enough to emulate a Norton, AVG, or McAfee warning pop up. DON'T CLICK ON IT. Like Rick set, do a hard shut down or unplug your computer right away. If your antivirus software is not configured to scan upon start up, then open up your antivirus program and start a scan on your own.
     
  5. wireguy

    wireguy TS Member

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    Yes, even timing is important. If something shows up out of the blue, especially something that isn't part of the stuff you routinely see and manipulate be afraid. Be very afraid.
     
  6. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    Get a Mac.
     
  7. cdan12

    cdan12 TS Member

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    before you re-format download malwarebytes anti-malware,its free removed a similar virus for me in a similar situation and will help in the future also, Dan Witcher
     
  8. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    I deal with this type of problem often.

    The solution I tend to use CAN save your data...

    I replace the hard drive in the machine - reformat the new drive and then place the old drive into an external drive case.

    Realize that the old drive still has the virus, etc. on it so it must be treated with great care, but once you 'clean' it you should be able to recover most of your data. Also, you now have an external drive to use for future back ups of data so this doesn't happen again.
     
  9. cnsane

    cnsane Member

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    Ahh,,, The Perils of Perusing Porn. It's the make-believe version of what you contract if you do it in Reality. And just like real life, everybody swears that's not how THEY got it.
     
  10. Quack Shot

    Quack Shot Active Member

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    Actually the gaming sites are the worst. Some of the illegal download venues have been pretty bad. Unfortunately with Porn sites, they can make more money on their content than they do on exploiting your systems.

    Barry C. Roach

    The answer is to be proactive in defense against this stuff. A Mac is vulnerable too, sometimes even more so, since Apple has been telling their customers not to worry about it. No matter what OS you run, you need to be proactive and help prevent this crap from deploying. I've seen infected Macs often enough to know it happens quite a bit. There are some interesting statistics about how many open vulnerabilities there are in the Mac OS as compared to Windows, and how long it takes for the patches to deploy. Windows is just a bigger target. If someone were to get the idea that Macs were an easy target AND worth the effort to exploit, there will be a LOT of unhappy Mac owners. Since Windows users are not dilligent in their systems defenses and it's a larger installed base, they get more bang for the buck hitting Windows at the moment.
     
  11. pyrdek

    pyrdek Well-Known Member

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    QuackShot,

    Yep, Macs are not immune to malware attacks but there are a couple of major differences in the way Macs are attacked compared to Windows based systems.

    I deal with close to 300 Macs. It is my job. I work at a university and most of Liberal Arts are Mac users. So far I have not had a single system that I can say with certainty has been lost to a virus. There are a couple of reasons that Mac can better handle an attack.

    IF a Mac user logs in with STANDARD user privileges, almost every thing he oe she can do is contained in their personal account settings. They have very little that can be done outside of their account. Even with this, the few attacks I am aware of involved someone trying to load some file (could be most any kind).

    Now if the user logs in with ADMINISTRATOR privileges, they can affect other settings on thye computer BUT there are still some critical files that even an Admin account can't touch. To get to those, you must specially enable the "Super Administrator", also called Root, from an Admin account and then know the separate, more difficult (hopefully) pass word to then login as the Superadministrator.

    Thus, to have a more devastating result, a user would, normally, have to be at least at the Administrator level. Unfortunately, far to many people decide to login in using an Admin account. Thus, they, themselves, open the first door for a system attack. If for whatever reason, they login using the SuperAdmin account, they have just left the entire computer exposed to everything.

    The bigger problem I am having lately is Adobe and their lack of security design in the original issue and the subsequent numerous updates that Adobe, and to a slightly lessor extent, Microsoft, have been issuing to block the security holes opened by Adobe and Microsoft. Mozilla and Google also have this kind of issue. To be sure, Apple also has this same type of problem. As for the timeliness of security patches, Apple seems to be much more responsive than Microsoft. MS has had some holes left open to attack for more than a year!

    We do run Sophos AV on our Windows and Apple systems. I have had one, that's right ONE, Sophos warning about a virus found on a MAC. It turned out to be a file someone downloaded from or for a PC. It was an .exe file which Apple does not even use.

    So Apple does offer a pretty decent track record in my school. I can also say that the PCs have been very, very, very much more negatively impacted by mal-ware attacks. Just to be sure, Macs using BootCamp or Parallels to run Windows do have all the same problems with their Windows opeartions as a full blown PC.
     
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