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comments on canterbury wireless Vs. wired ====HELP

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by motordoctor, Aug 28, 2008.

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  1. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    Our club is looking to buy a set of voice calls. Not sure if we want the old wired ones or the new wireless???.Not sure about which brand to buy??? Canterbury or something else???? Have you used either of them??? Do you like wired or wireless??? Looking for comments so we can make a decision. I know the canterbury wired ones work great and I have shot over them for years BUT what about the new stuff around. All comments are helpful but I do know about the wired ones. Motordoc
     
  2. Jim101

    Jim101 Active Member

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    Mdoc, We have four wired and two wireless canterburys and the wireless is the way to go. If we could afford it all six sets would be wireless.






    Jim
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    My club has both Canterbury wired and wireless voice calls. The wired sets are more difficult to set up and cumbersome to move. Their primary problem is the connection wires break near the microphone. But, the broken wires are easy to replace and repair.

    The wireless Canterbury calls are simple to set up and move around and they eliminate the broken wire problem. But, placement of the transceiver can be critical. We found that it did not work well inside the trap house and now mount ours on the exterior side of the trap house. They require batteries and this can sometimes cause problems. Last Sunday, a wireless set that had been working well gave us a lot of problems. Still haven't figured out what happened.

    One of my jobs at the club for many years is to set up the voice calls and keep them repaired. The wired and wireless calls each have advantages and disadvantages. At this time, I do not feel confident to recommend one type over the other.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. 635 G

    635 G Well-Known Member

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    Joe, you might want to look at ERAD, I experienced them at several shoots, they seem to be the system of the future.

    Lou
     
  5. cmptrwz1

    cmptrwz1 TS Member

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    Hi Pat, just would like to pass a little tip I found on how to keep the connector wires from breaking at the mic's and the boxes. On the plug ends, I double shrinkwrap the ends first. I put a piece of shrinkwrap on the wires that pass from the plug to the connector and shink it. Then after that I put the wire holder back on with about 2 inches of shrinkwrap beyond the wire holder. Then I shrinkwrap the connector to the wire to about 3 inches beyond the wire holder on the connector. This keeps the wires from breaking and keeps the guys from pulling on the wires when taking the system apart. This reinforcement has worked well and I don't get broken wires now, only on very rare occasions. I put the shrinkwrap on the connectors just below the nural ring that tightens the wire to the plug. After this, you should not have this problem with broken wires any longer.
     
  6. topgunoh

    topgunoh Member

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    Motordoc
    Our club switched from the wired to the wireless and had good luck with them the first year, now that they are on thier second season they are giving us fits. We are localed in NE Ohio and snow and rain really screw with them, also they are picky as to how you point the transmitter at the trap house, this gets worse the farther back you are past the 23 yd. line. They also eat battiers in the cold weather, 24 per field. But yes they are a piece of cake to set up and take down, don't have to worry about getting the control boxes wet, much less to damage while handling. But if we were to do it again we would of kept our wired systems.Bob Schultz has given us great service but can't seem to straighten our problem out.

    The shrink wrap trick works wonders for broken speaker wires, put a loop in the wire by the speakers and double tie wrap the wire to the stand post,also cut the bottom ear off the stands and just loop the wires loose and hang them on the top ear that ends any problems in the rest of the wire. Also use a small flat blade screwdrive to spread the pins once and a while on all the plugs and this helps eliminate the ghost problems, of them not working and unplugging and plugging back in and then they work and no one can figure out why. Target Shotguns, Bob Schultz sells a test kit ($150.00) that takes all the guess work out of troubleshooting the wired system.

    The outers do not impress me at all and every time I've shot over them have had problems. I have not seen or shot over any other brands, hope this helps.

    Dave Mowry
     
  7. JBrooks

    JBrooks TS Member

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    A key question is if you are going to have some fields wired and some wireless. We recently went through the same considerations and decided to continue with a new set of wired so that we could interchange parts on all 4 of our fields.
     
  8. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    I have used the ERAD system many times. It works well but the transmitters must be positioned correctly on each shooter and this is a problem for some. I also have concerns about shooters not returning the transmitters as they leave the field. I have made this mistake. Also, programing the ERAD transmitters can get complicated. They have several buttons and can be made to do many things. They can be set to only throw only 25 targets and replace the token boxes used at some clubs.

    JBrooks- Interchanging wired systems on 4 fields works well as long as all of the microphones are tuned to have the same resistance. If not, they can give slow pulls. It really does not matter what the resistance is, as long as it is the same on all 5 microphones on one field. A microphone falling over can change the position of the internal magnet and change the resistance.

    All three systems mentioned (Canterbury wired, Canterbury wireless and ERAD) can work well and each can have unique problems.

    I remain undecided about which system is best.

    Pat Ireland
     
  9. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    cmptrwhz- I have used the shrink wrap system you described. It does help a lot but my shooters have still figured out a way to break the wires. Removing the lower hook on the microphone stands also helps. This prevents someone from tightly wrapping and bending the cord when the microphones are stored.

    Pat Ireland
     
  10. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Pat, Your indecision is killing me! LOL. Seriously, what you are saying is those of us with the wired sets need to stay that way for several reasons. You have my attention with the "slow pull" mikes. I have seen that happen and not understood what the fix is. Do I/we need to purchase one of those test kits?? I've always wondered if they were worth the investment. Thanks for your help,Bob
     
  11. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Bob Hawkes- My indecision is based on the fact that I don't know which system is best. About all I can do is point out the positive and negative aspects of the three systems I have used.

    The test kits are good if you have a lot of units to keep in good shape. If you only have a few sets, my suggestion is to

    Pat Ireland
     
  12. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Pat. My thought is because we already own 10 or 11 sets of wired, it makes no sense to consider changing. Too expensive, even over a long period of time. I was hoping to get some information on the speakers from some one. I've heard people talk of calibration?? or matching of them?? Not a clue, as I'm a true cement head. This site still remains a good source of information for some of us. Thanks to all and have a good Labor Day. I've got to now go and do inventory. Have fun,Bob
     
  13. motordoctor

    motordoctor Shoji Tabuchi in Branson

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    hey guys. thanks for the information. by the way. there is a fellow by the name of Bryan pierce that makes the calibration kit and also is a Canterbury dealer. he has a bunch of information about the systems.


    Devils advocate-----how often do you change the batteries. any way of getting a number for voltage or length of use to Set up a schedule. did anyone think about using a lantern 6 volt battery mounted on the stands. it should have a longer life and could be strapped to the stand and wired in to the system. just a thought if it would work better. also could you use a rechargeable drill battery and make a plug to externally mount it and then just remove it at the end of the day and recharge. it.


    any thoughts. motordoc
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    The position of the magnet in the microphone can be changed by bumping the speaker. This will change the output of the microphone. I forgot what the actual units are so I will use the term "ohms" even though it is incorrect.

    It really does not make much difference what the "ohm" reading is on one set of microphones as long as they are all the same. If a set has different "ohms" outputs for different microphones, the target release time will be different. A set can be tuned by changing the resistors. What resistor is needed to bring a microphone back to the same output as the others requires testing. Not every microphone will require the same resistor. A series of resistors mounted on a board is a convenient way to find the right one. Resistors are cheap.

    Pat Ireland
     
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