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COMBAT COMMANDER .38 SUPER

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Loyac, Nov 11, 2007.

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  1. Loyac

    Loyac Member

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    My son-in-law has one of these he inherited from his dad. It is a 70 series, blued, wood grips and looks to be in excellent original condition. Any ideas what it might be worth? Thank you all. John
     
  2. WesleyB

    WesleyB Well-Known Member

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    Range from 750 to 1050 in my opinion.
     
  3. bridgetoofar

    bridgetoofar TS Member

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  4. GPer

    GPer TS Member

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    Arizona
    John,

    I would be a buyer for this gun should your son-in-law want to sell it.

    Thanks

    Mike
     
  5. Loyac

    Loyac Member

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    Thanks guys.

    Follow up question: What makes a 70 series so special?

    I asked Sean (Son-in-law) if he wanted to sell the gun. He wants to keep it.

    John
     
  6. Steve-CT

    Steve-CT TS Member

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    John Lorenz:

    I am going to give you a truthful answer and relate some of my own experience
    on this....


    To Colt enthusiasts the series 70 represented the last commercial 1911 version that didn't deviate too far from their established standard of perceived quality, and design changes. (Like having a "pre-64" Winchester)

    The series 80 that followed from 1980 until roughly the present, is as equally useful, but the biggest complaint initially hinged around the addition of the passive firing pin blocking device (now standard on many world famous police and military pistols such as Glock and SIG) causing pistol smiths some initial trouble getting nice trigger pulls. (It is true that some series 80 guns had crummy trigger pulls from the box) This has long been resolved and so many 1911 clones on the market other than Colt's have excellent triggers and the passive firing pin block.

    In recent years, Colt has been selling what they call "Series 70" guns again, but this is not truly the case except for their 1911 and 1911-A1 reproductions
    (limited editions of 3,000 each) which come with a blaze orange warning label on their outer, white cardboard shipping sleeve, that the pistol is not equipped with the passive firing pin device

    The "new" series 70 guns you see in gun shops for over a G-note with the pretty
    grip panels are nothing more than series 80 frames with old, left over series 70 slides dropped on them. The series 80 frame has a cut out inside to accomodate a trigger activated lever that slides up to depress the spring loaded firing pin block located in the slide - pushing that block up, allows the firing pin to move forward.

    Other cost cutting measures on series 80s included at some point, a plastic
    mainspring housing, which was rightly criticized for being liable to shatter if dropped on a hard surface, thus rendering the gun inoperable.

    IMO the series 70 was nothing to write home about, either. It used a split, spring steel collet bushing called the "accurizer" bushing that was prone to breakage, again rendering the gun inoperative in a firefight. Factory sights on both series 70 and series 80 models were horrible.

    That's about it in a nutshell. Colt was a big name at one time, but they've been easily eclipsed by a half dozen competitors making a better product, cheaper.

    I'd like to say your .38 Super would be worth 650 to 750-but good luck selling it. There are dozens of page listings on www.gunsamerica.com for Colt pistols of every flavor and I don't think they move that well despite the rumors about Colt having "collector" value. That's only true if you have a wartime 1911 or 1911A1 or commercial models prior to the 1970s.

    Please don't misinterpret me; I am not knocking your gun. I'm just telling the truth. There are tens of thousands of them available for sale and in .38 Super - it's a TOUGH sell.

    I made the mistake of shelling out over $2,000 five years ago for a Les Baer-Premier II in .38 Super because I thought I was going to get into some action pistol and use that caliber. Well, I ended up not persuing action pistol; it took me almost two years to sell the pistol that had fewer than 500 rds through it (not even broken in for a Baer - still assembly tight); I lost about half my money on it; could not find a local buyer anywhere in CT for it; talked to three major dealers and two of them would not even TAKE the gun on trade, one refused to even take it on consignment! I finally ended up selling through the dealer I bought it from - who made money on me TWICE for the same gun just to get rid of it so I could cut my losses. And it took him nearly TWO YEARS to find a buyer for it listing it via gunsamerica.com

    Trust me, you DON'T want a .38 Super. There is only ONE caliber for a 1911 pattern gun and that is..........the .45 ACP.

    There it is, the truth, plain and simple.
     
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