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Cleaning tubed barrels?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by IM390, Aug 3, 2007.

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  1. IM390

    IM390 Member

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    YESSSSSSS;

    Never allow your tube threads "to be cleaned" or you could be re-barreling your gun. (I heard of a few horror stories too scary to tell.)
     
  2. Old Ranger

    Old Ranger Member

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    IM390 & chatbrat:
    Hmmm! Let's talk about this. A few years ago I was under the impression that you did NOT remove tubes when cleaning, and as a result a thin-wall Briley rusted to the inside of my barrel. I couldn't remove it, my gunsmith couldn't remove it, and we had to send it back to Briley to get the tube drilled out and replaced.

    Since then I've been removing them when cleaning and coating them with anti-seize before reinstalling. There's no visible thread damage and they still screw in tightly.

    So what do we do???????

    Ranger
     
  3. JB Logan Co. Ohio

    JB Logan Co. Ohio TS Member

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    Would a brass brush really hurt steel threads?

    JB=Jerry Beach 8503917
     
  4. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    JB- Yes, use of a brass brush could wear the fine threads in the barrel. Bore cleaning compounds will pick up small debris from the barrel as will the brush as it is stored between cleanings. This mixture could easily form a fine honing compound that could wear the threads. Also, "cleaning" the threads can actually result in foreign material getting lodged into the threads.

    The choke tubes should be screwed into the barrel by hand tight enough so that the final tightening with a wrench will only move the tube a very slight distance. If you can move the tube 3/16 of an inch after final hand tightening, the threads are not in good shape.

    Pat Ireland
     
  5. Old Ranger

    Old Ranger Member

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    Pat,

    So if you don't remove the chokes when cleaning, how do you keep electrolytic action, acid, moisture etc. from causing corrosion between barrel and tube (particularly with dissimilar metals like black steel barrels and stainless steel chokes?) Is oil or anti-seize enough?

    Ranger
     
  6. timb99

    timb99 Well-Known Member

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    I usually remove the dirty choke tube first, run a thread chaser down the choke tube threads in the barrel to clean the threads, coat a clean choke tube with anti-sieze and install it.

    The thread chaser came with the gun, but you can buy them aftermarket.

    Then I clean the barrel.

    I soak the dirty choke tube in Ed's Red for a day or two until the plastic comes off.

    The reason I do this is I have found the choke tube to be the dirtiest part of the whole works. It takes much less time to get the barrel to "show clean" with a clean choke tube than with a dirty choke tube.

    Your mileage may vary.
     
  7. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I think that if it matters- just after brushing the bore out, and then cleaning the chokes seated in the barrel- you could clean the choke threads if you want-- may or may not be needed depending on the lubrication you applied when putting them in and quality of the chokes-- theory is that this area under the choke should be a gas tight seal with the lube applied

    in reality- there are some makers of choke tubes - where this gas tight seal doesnt occur and I will not mention names but several people I know have had great troubles with one maker who is taughted on here and his regular threaded tubes-- the tubes get locked in the barrel no matter what you seem to do

    the barrel - which probably has not accumulated any grit harder than the steel anyway- you could then take the choke tubes out and squirt some of the cleaning lubricant into the threads --- the only way grit harder than steel would be in the barrel is if the wind were blowing in a sand storm- you put it in or the cleaning instrument(s) had it on it/them

    allow the threads in the barrel to dry

    clean and lubricate the threads on the tube and reinsert

    brass is softer than even the mild steel used--- but your brush has to be clean as well- and some people dont even consider the brush or patch- has it picked up dirt?

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  8. code5coupe

    code5coupe Member

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    The OP was talking about tubed guns...like sub-gauge tubes...right? (Rather than choke tubes?)

    I wouldn't remove the tubes every time I cleaned the gun, but I'd remove them several times a year for a good barrel cleaning.
    Don't most tubed guns get shot without the tubes anyway??? You're going to have to clean the shot-without-tubes barrel with the tubes out.........

    I doubt anyone would wear out threads if they cleaned them with a brass brush every day for a lifetime....but I sure wouldn't be chasing them every time I cleaned the gun!
     
  9. g7777777

    g7777777 TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    code - I would agree with the subgauge tubes- they are not air tight -- and in fact rust can occur underneath them

    I would also use a rust preservative under them if you werent going to remove them often

    regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  10. Browning Man

    Browning Man TS Member

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    I put grease on my tubes before I put them in, but I would not clean the barrel with them out.
     
  11. Old Ranger

    Old Ranger Member

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    I just got off the phone with Briley, who fitted my gun with chokes, and their technical rep said that it was perfectly all right to clean barrels with the choke tubes removed, and that a brass brush will not damage the threads in a normal lifetime of a gun.
     
  12. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    My solution is to pull the dirty choke tube and put in a clean skeet tube and then brush and mop the bore. The open skeet tube minimizes brush wear and works better with a close fitting jag. Meanwhile the dirty choke tube is getting softened up on the bench with a solvent soaked rag stuffed in it. I don't think the brass brush will hurt the tube threads but exposed threads pick up a lot of gunk that has to be cleaned before installing a fresh tube. When the bore and choke tube are clean, I put a little white grease on the tube threads and assemble everything. Done this way, choke tubes are easy to remove but don't back themselves out while shooting.
     
  13. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

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    As an old gunsmith that has been doing this a long time, I clean subgauge tubes with brass brushes and oil. Aluminum does not seem to have fouling problems like steel barrels. I take a chamber brush and chuck it in a drill on a rod, and occasionally clean choke threads. I also occasionally take the same chamber brush/drill combo and clean chamber/forcing cones.

    As far as the steel barrel, I take the choke tubes out and use the appropriate chamber brush and clean barrel threads. I sometimes chuck the choke tube on the brush/drill combo and clean threads with a brass toothbrush.

    I have had my K-80 Sporter since 1994. The Briley tubes are brighter and burnished than when new, and the choke tubes fit the tubes and barrel about the same.

    Briley is right. A normal lifetime of cleaning will not affect these parts. Tubesets are rated for steel shot, and are NOT soft.

    I do not use the Brownell's "double tuff" brushes in tubesets, but do in steel bores and choke tubes. Soft chamber brushes will not faze the anodized aluminum.

    I too have made a good living off folks that do not routinely service their screw-choked firearms. :^)))
     
  14. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    Many do not have the same ideas about not cleaning a barrel with the choke tubes removed. Many more will not favor my pattern of removing the single choke tube I use about once every three years to apply a thin coat of medium grease to the threads.

    I contend that removing tubes frequently is an excellent way to get debris into the fine threads. I suspect that my ideas are not the same as the majority of shooters.

    Pat Ireland
     
  15. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    zarathrusta- Your cleaning is better than mine. Yes, I do keep my choke tube in for several years. I never change the choke I use and see no reason to remove it. It has never become stuck during the years I keep it in place. If it does get stuck, I really do not care. It is the choke I want in the barrel.

    In theory, storing a gun without a tube in place would offer the possibility of dirt getting into the barrel threads. From a practical sense, the worst part of doing this is th possibility that when you take the gun out you might forget to put any tube in the barrel before you shoot the gun.

    Pat Ireland
     
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