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Cleaning a receiver??

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Barrelbulge(Fl), Dec 16, 2011.

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  1. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I took my Ithaca Century apart to clean it. Dirtiest gun I have ever looked at. When the stock came off there was an unbeleivable amount of dirt and grunge in it. I sprayed it with shotgun cleaner then used a toothbrush and sprayed some more. Now what I am wondering is what is the best way to lubricate all the innerds? Can you give me your opinion. Thanks, Bulge.
     
  2. daddiooo

    daddiooo TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    Rem-oil?? Or Giacomos favorite....itsa' TriFlow. No usa' da' grease.
     
  3. Barrelbulge(Fl)

    Barrelbulge(Fl) TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I was wondering if I had to put grease on anything. Bulge.
     
  4. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    G96 or Birchwood Casey's "Barricade" both are very good light lubes and great rust preventers. I'd use a light oil like fishing reel oil on the trigger sears though. The spray oils are too light viscosity wise.
     
  5. BDodd

    BDodd TS Member

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    As much as folks think I'm nutty'er than a fruit cake, I spray with carb. cleaner, blow it out with compressed air then spray with WD40 and blow that with the compressed air, wipe it down and assemble. Been working well for many many years......breakemall
     
  6. Mr. Flinch

    Mr. Flinch Member

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    This i what I do. Using a toothpick I put tiny amounts of gun grease such as Rig onto the sear and hammer where they meet. This helps prevent wear and will make the trigger pull feel smoother in some cases. Then just a drop of Break Free or TriFlow on surfaces that pivot. Then I let the action set open and drain any excess oil for an hour or so, wipe any excess oil that might be on the receiver block, frame or trigger then reassemble. I also store my guns in the safe with barrels down to prevent oil from penetrating the wood in the stock.
     
  7. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    Any good solvent--carb cleaner is ok just don't get any on the wood blow out with air compressor, I use plain ATF & light grease on hinge pins & other places where there are pressure points. No problems so far 50+ years. Ross Puls
     
  8. mag410

    mag410 Active Member

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    I'm with BDodd, hose it down with WD-40 with a nozzle attached, spay in every orifice until it runs out everywhere, then blow off everything that you can with compressed air. I have replaced the WD-40 with Rem-Oil but never has a problem when I used WD-40. If you don't have any compressed air a day in the sun to drain on an old rag will do just as well. "They" say WD-40 will eventually gum up, but I usually only do this if I get good and wet and that usually happens at least once a year.

    Michael Goines
     
  9. flybyknight

    flybyknight Member

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    I use Gun Scrubber, a toothbrush or equivilent, toothpicks for crevices, then blow it dry. Repeast as necessary. When clean, I spray with slick-1 liberally, then blow the excess off. Skick-2 actually permiates the metal pores and provides good lubrication but doesn't hold the dirt or powder residue like an oil does. You can use a light grease on the sear/hammer contact area. Never, I repeat Never, use WD-40 as a lubricant, it is a degreaser and has no lubricity, the primary ingredient of WD-40 is TCE. Bob K
     
  10. Bird30

    Bird30 TS Member

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    I am with Barry as I have used G96 from WW2 in the 40's. It was a service lube and cleaner in WW2 and it was G66 in the service. After the war it was sold as G66 and Phillips 66 sued them because they said it was their logo so they changed it to G96. It does everything cleans, lubricate and is a rust preventive. Never had a gun rust or freeze up using it. They immersed a MI in salt water after it was treated with G96 and it began to rust after 33 days in salt water. That sold me and it smells good.

    Dave
     
  11. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    Brake cleaner, blow out, RemOil, blow out, reassemble. Clean and lubed (with anything) is better than dirty and dry. Lube discussions will never lead to agreement, but maybe will keep us entertained through the winter. Mark
     
  12. Rich219

    Rich219 Active Member

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    Put it in an ultrasonic tank and then lube.
     
  13. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    "Never, use WD-40 as a lubricant, it is a degreaser and has no lubricity, the primary ingredient of WD-40 is TCE"



    flybyknight, Where do you get that info? I can find nothing to back up that claim.
     
  14. Anthony12ga

    Anthony12ga Member

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    I've ofter heard that Naphtha or lighter fluid is good to use as a cleaner and it leaves an oil film.

    I like Mr.Flinch's suggestion of Break free or TriFlo on the pivot points
     
  15. Oregunner

    Oregunner Well-Known Member

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    WD-40 says right on the can that it lubricates. I used it on my bicycle chain for years, but not on my guns. It is better than nothing, just don't let it build up, dry out, and turn to varnish. Apply then blow off excess. Mark
     
  16. BigM-Perazzi

    BigM-Perazzi Well-Known Member

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    It's not the best of anything, but, it damn near works for everything...

    and, here is the MSDS sheet..

    WD-40 MSDS sheet.
     
  17. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    I was just say'n to myself earlier today "self, we haven't seen a TS.COM gun cleaning and lube thread in awhile". Then low and behold whaala there it was.
     
  18. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    WD40 is 60% Stoddard Solvent, which contains naptha.

    behold the great prohet grntitan!
     
  19. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Correct me if i'm wrong, but Stoddard Solvent drys and leaves nothing behind. It is what i have used for years in my parts washer and i don't recall it leaving any lubrication behind. So if WD-40 is 60% Stoddard Solvent, what is the other 40% that makes it a great lube? I know it leaves behind some sort of oily residue but nothing like oils designed for guns. I will say WD-40 is great for displacing water/moisture(which is what it was designed for) and also works pretty good for cleaning certain items but i question it's use as an effective gun lube. I wouldn't use just WD-40 on any of my guns unless the only other choice was running them completely dry.
     
  20. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

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    WD 40 has a natural "animal" oil in it, doesn't it? If you use too much oil, of any kind, it'll end up soaked into you wood. Be careful.
     
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