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Citori hammer spring replacement

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by BigDaddy, Apr 19, 2008.

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  1. BigDaddy

    BigDaddy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5
    Is there a special tool required to change these out? I bought some new springs from Wolff and can get the old springs out easy enough but it sure is a pain in the a$$ trying to replace them. What does the plethora of knowledge on this board have to say.
     
  2. Gregg535

    Gregg535 Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    230
    I have a tool that I made up years ago for changing them that helps quite a bit.

    It is just an average size flat bladed screwdriver that has a small rounded slot area removed from the tip-center of the blade. I remember making it, and I put the screwdriver in a vise (blade up) and put 2 hacksaw blades together on the same frame (to make a wider cut). After cutting down into the blade about 1/8 inch, I smoothed and rounded out the cut area with a small fine rat-tiled file.

    There are probably better tools to use, but this works fairly well and I haven't scratched up the hammers, etc.
     
  3. maclellan1911

    maclellan1911 TS Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,226
    I find buying less exspensive screw drivers (the sales bins at sears are good source) grind bend twist until useable for task at hand.
     
  4. Rem870TB

    Rem870TB Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    617
    I actually compressed mine with a piece of thin, strong string (I am not making this up, it was a move of desparation and it worked).

    It is hard ot describe in print but I found it easy to do.

    I put the cord through the spring near the forward end, closest to the muzzle with the action on a padded surface. I restrained the action and gripped the cord, pulling it back. It compressed the spring and I was able to get things seated.

    There was no metal/metal contact or anything that could damage something if a tool slipped.

    Maybe not the best method but it worked for me (at least once).
     
  5. BigDaddy

    BigDaddy TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    5
    Ill try the notched screwdriver idea. The problem I seem to be having is keeping the pin end in the receiver with such a long spring fighting me all the way while I get the other end lined up in the detent on the hammer.
     
  6. Gary Waalkes

    Gary Waalkes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2007
    Messages:
    1,399
    Take a pair of side-cutting pliers, close them and drill a hole in them that fits the end of the hammer spring strut. Now you can grab the strut, compress the spring and get it into position. PS - you don't really have to drill that hole, just grab the end of the strut - you cannot hurt it with pliers.
     
  7. Easystreet

    Easystreet Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,463
    CAUTION: When attempting to compress the spring, it is best to put a large sheet or towel over your work in case the tool slips and launches the strut and spring across the room into a pile of junk. I had that happen one time and it took me at least an hour just to find the parts, and I'm lucky that I found them at all.
     
  8. ECWis

    ECWis TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    19
    If you get one of these, it's already flattened and tempered to the right size:

    http://www.amazon.com/4-Professional-Tack-Puller/dp/B000NPPCCS

    Just take a small burr bit on a dremel tool, and grind the "V" in the tack puller into a "U" shape that fits over the spring rod.

    Slide the tool over the rod, pull it back to compress the spring a little bit. Then, grab the part of the rod that is exposed with a needle nose pliers in your other hand. Next, be deliberate and simultaneously pull back to compress the spring, and use the pliers to guide rod into the hole, then slowly let the spring extend.

    I'm not a gunsmith, and I had trouble with these springs at first, it was kind of intimidating. Now that I have the above method down, it takes longer to get the recoil pad off!
     
  9. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    8,354
    Location:
    Nashville Tn
    Small cheap sidecutters and good hand strength. They pop right in.

    The fact that I have removed and re-installed several hundred might help too.
     
  10. 2506

    2506 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9
    I use a small mechanical press fron Harbor Frt
    compress the spring with the pin threw a thin plate with a slot cut in it just large enough for the pin to go threw but not the spring when spring is compressed grab the pin with a pair of needle nose visegrips and pry off the plate with the slot works well once you get the hang of it
     
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