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Cheekbone Making Contact On Comb?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by preacherman, Feb 5, 2008.

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  1. preacherman

    preacherman TS Member

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    I went thru quite a few years using a gun with about 1/5" drop at comb. I would mount the gun and leave about a 1/4" gap between my cheekbone and the stock. If I were to fully seat my cheekbone on the stock, I could not see over the receiver or just barely be able to see over depending on the other stock measurements. I made it work by "learning" how to place a gentle pressure on the side of the stock to stay somewhat but not perfectly stable.

    I now have my stock high enough to allow me to rest my cheekbone over the comb and actually make contact with a moderate pressure. Now I only have to learn the correct pressure because the contact gives a dependable reference that has my eye locked in the right place over the barrel. When the gun recoils now, I move with the gun. I never really got smacked holding the other way but I was surely more inconsistant in my shooting compared to mounting fuly on the top of the gun.

    I had read a few stockfitting comments but most never made specific reference to the actual "cheekbone" contact and always vaguely referred to "cheek" contact. I had someone evaluate my mount one time but I was never asked if I was fully seated on the comb. They just looked at my eye down the barrel. Needless to say my evaluation results did not include building up the comb.

    Which way do most of you mount on the comb? Am I on the right track?
     
  2. Capt. Morgan

    Capt. Morgan TS Member

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    Which way do most of you mount on the comb?

    ... the way you are doing it now!

    Morgan
     
  3. shot410ga

    shot410ga Well-Known Member

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    Cheek bone to stock, high rib, high comb, head held up high, and straight forward. By doing this I know my face is in the right place on each mount. Low comb, low rib means I cock my head forward so it looks like I'm seeing through the top part of my glasses.
     
  4. preacherman

    preacherman TS Member

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    Thanks for the replies. I really think that there are a lot new of guys who could be reading this board that are slightly off the comb with their cheekbone like I was doing.
     
  5. sammyd95

    sammyd95 TS Member

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    I had the whole Mole on my 1100 tourny !
     
  6. xb2dr

    xb2dr TS Member

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    The way I was taught was to mount your gun, touch the corner of your mouth the stock and then drop your head straight down. That way you have a bit of cheek between the stock and your cheek bone. If you mount your gun and then bring your head in from the side and drop your cheek bone straight onto the wood then it's more than likely that you gun will hurt you after a while. I'm far from an expert, but this was the single most effective piece of advice I ever recieved. Brett.
     
  7. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    When a gun fits and the shooter is using a correct gun mount (with the heel of the stock in the shoulder pocket and even with the top of the shoulder and the head turned only slightly toward the stock), the head and neck are upright as was mentioned. The eyes are looking through the centers of the lenses in the shooting glasses. This is especially important when using corrective lenses.

    Only enough pressure by the cheek on the comb is used to insure that the position of the head (and eye) relative to the rib does not change during swings. When it does, the POI of the gun changes without the shooter's knowledge.

    Mount consistency is important! To shoot consistently, the mount must be consistent. It is made consistent by a gun that fits and by practicing gun mounts at home. (Shoppers get nervous when they see someone practicing gun mounts in the local mall.)

    Rollin
     
  8. preacherman

    preacherman TS Member

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    Rollin,
    You have used a "cheek" reference but do not specify if you are talking about the cheekbone itself or just the cheek. This is the very thing that confuses many people as to how they are supposed to "cheek" the gun.
    I am not talking about how much pressure as we know people do that to different degrees, etc.
    I am talking ONLY about the cheekbone making contact to the comb and still being able to see over the receiver. I can use my "cheek" and mild "pressure" to raise my "cheekbone" completely off the comb (about 1/8 to 1/4" depending on the stock)and be somewhat consistant as I did it that way for years and trained myself at it. I now have built my comb up to allow me to seat my "cheekBONE" on the comb (with mild pressure) to allow me to be even more consistant.
    Are both ways accepted as correct?
     
  9. Rollin Oswald

    Rollin Oswald Active Member

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    Preacherman;

    You make a good point. I am referring to the portion of the cheek that covers the bottom of the cheekbone, the part which, if you try to lower your head any farther, prevents it from being lowered because of the cheekbone.

    That brings up the question of the possible thicknesses of flesh between the comb and the cheekbone. If the comb contacts the cheek well below the cheekbone and the cheek is lowered (or the comb raised) to increase the pressure of the cheek on the comb, the eye will be farther above the rib because of the greater thickness of flesh between the cheekbone and the comb.

    This may be beneficial to raise the POI for someone with a low shooting gun but would increase the difficulty of having consistent gun mounts as a result of variations in cheek placements or flesh thicknesses. It might also make it more difficult to keep the cheek/head/eye in the same place (relative to the rib) during swings.

    Plump cheeks can challenge getting consistent gun mounts for the same reason. It is more difficult to consistently mount the gun with a consistent amount of cheek-flesh between the bone and the comb to obtain a consistent eye/rib alignment both horizontally and vertically.

    Plump cheeks are softer than bonier cheeks and although more flesh between the cheek"bone" and the comb will reduce the possibility of punishment to the cheek by the comb, it is offset by the greater difficulty of keeping the eye aligned with the rib during mounts and especially during swings.

    To a great extent, it is another incidence of 'practice-makes-perfect'.

    Rollin
     
  10. Hap MecTweaks

    Hap MecTweaks Well-Known Member

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    Measurements from the pupil to where the cheek bone rests comfortably on a comb varies a lot between people. Some require a 1 inch drop at the comb while others may have 1-1/2 inches. I look at the cheek bone as a mounting base for the rear sight on a shotgun, the pupil. Hap
     
  11. preacherman

    preacherman TS Member

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    Hap, You and I are on the same page for sure.
     
  12. Old Cowboy

    Old Cowboy Active Member

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    preacherman,

    Sounds like you're on the right track, firm enuf' contact to provide a solid rear sight (shooting eye) mount. Yet if you get down TOO hard on the comb it'll sore your cheek.

    John C. Saubak
     
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