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Checking your sights when mounting the shotgun.

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by country gentleman, Sep 28, 2008.

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  1. country gentleman

    country gentleman Member

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    The good idea, is to practice your properly fitted gunmount, to some degree of perfection while checking the beads for success. When you have checked enough, your body gets a FEEL for a properly mounted gun. In short, you will know the gun is mounted properly from FEEL not SIGHT. This practiced step, will allow you to transition away from bead checking, over time, and put more attention on the bird. In the process, you eliminate 2 eye focuses. 1 to bead check and 1 to hold point. Those eye steps have now been erased. 2 eye focuses per target is 200 focuses per event. A definate step in the right direction. Keep up the good work. Yours in Shooting, Todd Nelson
     
  2. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

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    Todd's right on target. I couldn't have put it better.

    Keep up the good work.

    Joe
     
  3. country gentleman

    country gentleman Member

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    Sport,
    The advice only works if the gun mount is practiced correctly, combined with proper fit. If you have never been professionally fitted, you are practicing sub-standard form, generated by poor fit, rewarded with bead alignment. You can still break targets this way. Inconsistent scores are always the tell-tale sign that something is wrong. However, fitted or not, still a good idea to practice the eye thing. It will simplify your approach, reduce eye fatigue, and clear your mind for less distraction. We tend to think about the thing we are looking at. Yours in Shooting, Todd
     
  4. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    After all these years, visually referencing the bead picture and verifying hold point, prior to my distant focal point, is part of my pre-shot routine (ritual?).

    KNOWING my gun mount and hold point is correct works as a positive re-enforcement that gives me more confidence in my equipment. More confidence in my equipment would seem to make it less likely to bead check during the shot (yes, Dummy, the beads are still there!)

    Different strokes for different folks.

    I do recommend a person well versed in gun fit checking you and your gear out.

    I am exceedingly lucky in that most factory guns, especially my fixed stock Unsingle Browning Combo, actually FIT me. My Perazzi Try-Stock works for me when everything is set at zero!

    Most folks are not that lucky.
     
  5. jerry chipman

    jerry chipman Member

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    I put a middle bead on the rib of my duck gun so I could make sure I was all aligned and had my head down but funny thing, all I ever see is that big old duck or goose and never paid any more attention to the rib or beads, now if I could just do that with targets. Jerry
     
  6. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    Until you get new things programmed into your hard drive, you will have to THINK about it. If what you do works for you, why change?

    What I do works for me, and this year, I have shot lifetime bests in every clay target game I shoot.

    It ain't broke, and I am not going to fix it.

    Maintaining your routine under pressure and while on a short squad is cardinal to not getting flustered or fatigued. If, while on a two man squad, the other shooter is calling for a target before I have dismounted my gun, I do not change my routine or speed up my pace.

    There are times I will shoot a three minute round by myself just to refresh subconcious gun handling, loading, unloading, set up and such.

    When I am shooting with others on a squad, I maintain my routine and pace.

    As a Coach, I think about how I train folks, and use the same techniques, adapted to MY shooting style on every shot. I take very close to 6 seconds to setup and shoot from the time the shooter before me makes his shot.
     
  7. ronbo142

    ronbo142 TS Member

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    If your gun fit you would not need to check.

    Mine fits never look at the darn "sights" you have got to be kidding me.

    You point a shotgun and aim a rifle and pistol therefore, if your gun is properly fitted then you will never need to look at a reference point (BEAD) ever again.

    Ronbo
     
  8. Shooting Coach

    Shooting Coach Banned User Banned

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    Top Trainers and Coaches mostly agree that beads are needed as a reference while setting up and as a landmark in the peripheral vision during the shot.

    Such Coaches train the Olympic team that go win medals. These are folks who develop and train the world's best shooters.

    I tend to listen to them over other folks.
     
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