1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

cast iron skillets

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by nutty1, Oct 7, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. nutty1

    nutty1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    182
    hey guy's, i just got turned on to cast iron skillets and have never cooked on or cleaned or seasoned one, there kinda hard to find here in san diego, any advice as to care and the above would be greatly appreciated, i finally found a few [different sizes] and am ready to start usen em thanks again steve
     
  2. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    14,422
    I will not allow iron skillets in my house as long as I am alive...........they might hasten my death.


    I got mine at some sporting goods store a long time ago to camp out with.


    I have also seen them at the dreaded coporate giant Walmart.

    I would think you can easly find them and the correct way to season them online.
     
  3. nutty1

    nutty1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    182
    wow rick, i'm sorry, i did not realize this thread would upset anyone, just curious what is your hatred for them seriously
     
  4. ML

    ML Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Messages:
    113
    I use cast iron skillets all the time and the best way to season them is to coat the skillet with veg. oil and bake them in the oven for several hours. Also if you bake biscuits in them for 6 months you will have a fine skillet. Cast iron will not hurt you.

    Regards

    M.L.
     
  5. MKillian

    MKillian TS Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Nutty,

    I'd guess Rick can withstand a whack from an aluminum skillet when his wife gets mad but a cast iron one might do a real number to his skull!

    I use one for baking cornbread. I can't see any advantage to using one on a stove unless you like to suffer doing things the olde-timey way.

    Mike
     
  6. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    14,422
    The aluminum will bend, the cast iron will not!!!!

    I have heard flaxseed oil is the best for seasoning a pan, but again, I really don't know that much about it.

    Some people say they can tell the difference between food cooked on alumimum and cast iron pots and pans.

    I know that food cooked out side on them does seem to taste better, but I did not know if it was the oil/grease/lard or the cook that made the difference. Combination of all, I suspect.

    I can't used them on my wifes new cooktop stove, so I gave all mine away since I don't go camping anymore.
     
  7. Rick Barker

    Rick Barker Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2009
    Messages:
    14,422
    The aluminum will bend, the cast iron will not!!!!
     
  8. ML

    ML Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2008
    Messages:
    113
    My wife calls that the FPT (frying pan treatment). Great for cornbread too.


    M.L.
     
  9. nutty1

    nutty1 TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    182
    i heard to clean them use a bamboo scraper but no soap? steve
     
  10. powderburn

    powderburn Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2008
    Messages:
    486
    Location:
    Anderson, IN
    Hi!
    Make a deep dish pizza in it sometime. It's as close to getting a deep dish Chicago style pie you can get without being in the Windy City. Get ready made crust-Pillbury, by the canned biscuits, grease the pan liberally, get the dough in, form it, shape it, and pinch it up the side walls till it sticks over the top of the rim, and then fill it in with your favorite pizza ingredients. You can pile it fairly high-as it bakes the stuffing will settle.

    We also will use alfredo sauce as the sauce sometimes along with some chopped spinach and grilled chicken breasts sliced and then put in. Some broccoli sprigs are a good addition too. Then some shredded cheese over all that, and OMG are you in for a treat.

    Enjoy those pans. You CAN wash them in the sink, but hand dry them immediately and take a napkin with some veg oil on it and wipe it into the metal then put it away. Store it with a pot lid that fits to keep dust out.
     
  11. capvan

    capvan Active Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,032
    I've been using cast iron cookware for many, many years. The key to the "seasoning" is to simply use the pan, a LOT. You can start off by oiling it and baking it, but lots of use is the key. I've got a cast iron pan that eggs just slide right out of, just like the TV demos of teflon.

    The best way to buy cast iron cookware is used. Then a lot of the seasoning is already taken care of.

    I bought a pan that had years of baked on gunk on it. I had it sandblasted and it was good as new, except I had to start the seasoning process all over.

    If you drop one, just hope your foot is not in the way. And whatever kind of floor you have, you will be able to tell where you dropped the pan.

    I really LOVE my cast iron stuff...

    cap
     
  12. patrick smith

    patrick smith TS Member

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2009
    Messages:
    74
    Cast iron cookware is the best,tou can use them on your stove top,campfire or your oven as a bake pan.

    To season it use your favorite cooking oil and rub it all over every surface
    and put low heat for a while,to clean fill half full of water and heat to
    boiling and scrub with a stiff brush or wadded up tin foil.

    Then rub cooking oil on it again and put on hot burner and allow to cool.

    ENJOY!!!!!! pat

    PS also throw out all your non-stick pans out they suck.
     
  13. cunninmp

    cunninmp Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    639
    Go to the above website. He use's lard in a 200' oven for 3 hours.
    I got 4 antique cast iron dutch ovens. All rusty and 2 of them made
    around 1900. Took a power grinder and brought them down to bare metal.
    Only difference was I lined the rack in the oven with aluminum foil
    and my oven was about 225. Don't get it to hot or will smoke if the
    lard burns. Ran mine for about 4 to 4 1/2 hours then turned off oven.
    Let mine cool in the oven for about 8 hours.
    If you think you need additional seasoning, the next day lightly wash
    the pot and repeat the above.
    I had 1 pot that was made from very dense iron. After I did the above,
    took 2 cups of peanut oil (higher flash point) and 1 cup of salt. Brought
    the oil up to almost boiling and with a basting brush rubbed the mixture
    all around the inside of the pot. Let it sit for a day. Lightly washed it
    out and a thin coat of vegetable oil. That was 8 years ago and it's still
    working.

    Mike Cunningham
    Groveland, CA
     
  14. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,901
    Location:
    FL
    Best way to clean cast iron pans after years of baked on grease is to put them into a self cleaning oven and let the heat turn all that grundge to ash. They will come out like new. Of course they will have to be seasoned all over again. Marc
     
  15. sixten38

    sixten38 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2008
    Messages:
    208
    To season it oil it with vegetable oil, into the oven on low heat 250ish for several hours before first use. As to cleaning I have been told to use hot water only if at all possible. Hot water will not remove the seasoning, if you have to use soap or a brillo pad then you will need to re-season. Also be careful with tomato ingredients, in a well season pan/pot you will probably not notice the iron taste but in a newer one you will. I use my skillet for an Alton Brown ribeye recipe attached that is outstanding and simple.
     
  16. Dickgshot

    Dickgshot Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,676
    Powderburn: Authentic deep dish pizza as made originally by Uno's Pizzeria
    in Chicago was ccoked in a cast iron skillet and actually served in the skillet with a warning by the waitress not to touch it. That was in the 50's.
    Nowdays, somebody would probably touch it and file a million dollar lawsuit.
     
  17. rhett1977

    rhett1977 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    Messages:
    334
    Lard is the best thing to season one with. If you get a used one put it in a hot fireplace for 2 to 3 hours right on top of the wood. A self cleaning oven will suffice. After it cools, rub it with lard (animal fat lard is better) it is more expensive but it works great. Then fill it to the top with lard and cook it for 4 to 6 hours at about 250 degrees. Pour out the lard and wipe the rest out with paper towels. Cast iron is the best for cooking. Period! I have 2 skillets that are over 65 years old that my grandma gave me and I only make biscuits or cornbread on them and never clean them outside of wiping them out. The ones I cook in I was with mild soap and dry them in the stove. They are so well seasoned that I don't have to worry about food sticking.

    On a side note, you can always fry some fish or chicken or whatever in oil and that will season it halfa**. If you do I'd use peanut oil because of the higher smoke point
     
  18. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,399
    Location:
    Stranger in a Strange Land
    Like skinning a cat... My skillets are black, shiny, and smooth. I like canola oil and 500 degree heat. It is done when it stops smoking, let cool a bit, wipe down with a lint free towel with more canola (also used olive oil, and crisco), let completely cool, repeat another 3-5 times depending on the texture of the skillet face.

    Once they are completely seasoned, they are virutally stick free, when finished cooking and they are cool, just rinse under warm water and wipe out with a paper towel. If you have a plastic scraper that comes with the cooking stones you can use something like that to get rid of bigger chuncks of food. For storage, just throw a little oil on a paper towel and wipe off inside and out to include handle. NO big deal.

    If cooking acidic (tomato based for example) foods, clean skillet immediately after use, transfer food to a bowl or whatever and get that skillet clean. Tomato sauce, etc.. will eat your seasoning.
     
  19. sandyman

    sandyman TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    12
    New cast iron has pores like your skin. What you want is to fill in those pores with cooked oil to make the skillet smooth and stick free. As mentioned, use the skillet as often as you can. Fry everything in it. All new skillets say they are preseasoned, which is not the whole story. I NEVER use soap in mine as it ruins the seasoning pores. HOT water soak for a few min and use a good non scratching bristle brush to clean then dry well and use oil to wipe the entire skillet to keep from rusting. You can fry some bacon and wipe the grease all over the inside and place in 225 oven for several hours. Repeat as often as you want to get the non stick surface started. Never put your HOT skillet in water until it has cooled as they can crack. Plenty of frying and NO soap will give you a skillet that you will never wear out. They only get better with age as long as you care for it.
     
  20. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,400
    Location:
    S-E PA
    I was given a cast iron griddle that was useless - no matter what everything stuck to it.

    Took an air grinder and some 36 grit disks and ground it all smooth as glass. Once seasoned it works like a charm...
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.