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Can we please stop romanticizing farming?

Discussion in 'Politics, Elections & Legislation' started by J.Fred.Muggs, Feb 5, 2013.

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  1. J.Fred.Muggs

    J.Fred.Muggs TS Member

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    Can we please stop romanticizing farming?

    http://www.humanevents.com/2013/02/04/on-the-9th-day-god-created-subsidies/
     
  2. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    The big boys are not farmers, they're businessmen.

    They are the 10 % that get 75% of the subsidy money. Many of them live off the farm, in places like Cleveland or Atlanta, etc.

    Half the farmers were forced off their land when loans were called in, years ago, and now they work the same land as hired hands for the big boys.

    PCA was instrumental in this and educators encouraged it. Mortgaging your land to buy expensive equipment you didn't need to increase production and pay off the loans was encouraged in High school ag classes.

    Then the bottom fell out.

    This is another whole story. (if historians don't sweep it under the rug)

    HM
     
  3. 90Tshooter

    90Tshooter Member

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    The family farm of 100 or so acres with milk cows, assorted other livestock, farm truck, tractor and equipment, is a thing of the past. My sister and brother-in-law were the last of the family farm operations in their rural area. When they quit a woman wrote an article in the local newspaper referencing the end of an era in America. There are a couple of local farmers that stayed in farming but like all other businesses they grew to large operations.

    Joe
     
  4. g7777777

    g7777777 Active Member

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    Farmers are good people

    People like GW.5 who I hear made a 10 million dollar net profit over the last 8 years because the government doubled the susidized levels required for bio fuels and thus caused the doubling of the price of corn and beans arent supermen. Gw.5 inherits his grandfathers and wifes grandfathers land and then makes 10 million over the last 8 years and he wants to become a heroe to the American people? I dont think so

    Farmers have had lean years though and Gw.5 and all the other guys that didnt make his 10 million are absolutely vital to Americas economy and to peoples enjoyment and survival

    Farmers are to be applauded- they work hard-- suffer the weather and dangers inherent in farming to feed you

    Regards from Iowa

    Gene
     
  5. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe

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    Don't bitch about farmers with your mouth full
     
  6. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    The author of the link speaks of the subsidies. As a farmer I am completely comfortable with the government eliminating the farm subsidies as long as the government does away with every other subsidy as well.

    Halfmile is correct. The "get big or get out" mentaltity ran rampant in the 70's and the day of reckonning came in the early 80's. It was taught in colleges as well as highschool. It was kind of like Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in the mid 90's through 2008, borrow all you can on your home, buy more homes, no equity or down payment. Then the day of reckoning came in October, 2008. Yes, history does repeat itself.
     
  7. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    The small farmer still does exist to some extent around here but most of those guys have a 'regular job' to pay the bills and work the farm on the side for extra income. But the bigger farms and ranches are businesses with multiple employees (guess where most of them are from) and they do really well some years and not so well others. It is high risk and depends on the availability of water. An extended drought in the Sierras could wipe a lot of them out.

    It for sure isn't a romantic happy story but it isn't a bad life either.

    Like Catpower says, its hard to bitch when your mouth is full of what the farmers produce. We might complain about the high cost of food but we can still get it and with relative ease. I think the farm subsidies may be abused in some cases but they do provide a measure of insurance for our way of life in that it helps keep people in the farm business. We would be sunk with out those folks.
     
  8. Ross

    Ross Well-Known Member

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    WHAT!!!!!!! Didn't you see that gal on TV that said she didn't care a bit about the farmer, she gets "everything" she needs from the supermarket. They breed and vote too.Ross Puls
     
  9. halfmile

    halfmile Well-Known Member

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    I would wager the land values are back up to nice high levels now that a lot of the family farms have been shaken out.

    HM
     
  10. Catpower

    Catpower Molon Labe

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    I still have family and friends that run family farms in NW Iowa, yeah they all have gotten some subsidies, but it the Op is complaining he could plop down a couple mil and buy his own farm

    If the giverment would get out of the farmer's business they would be much less need for any subsides
     
  11. likes-to-shoot

    likes-to-shoot Well-Known Member

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    That link will tell you what your area farmers are getting in subsidies. Several people I graduated with (1967) moved off the farm and never went back still get some (quite high is some cases) subsidies.

    The old adage of "don't bitch about farmers with you mouth full" is kinda out of touch with corporate farms who's owner's have never got mud on their boots in their lifetime.

    I'm all for the family farmer getting subsidies but when the corporate farms get millions on millions compared to the crumbs the family farmer gets I say enough is enough. Particulary now when prices are high enough profits are beimg made.
     
  12. SeldomShoots

    SeldomShoots Active Member

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    Farmland values are up quite a bit, mostly driven by higher corn and soybean prices, and some folks are scared to invest in the stock market. I have seen land in Indiana within the last year sell for $5,600 per acre up to $17,000.00 per acre. I guess if you can buy land for $8,000.00 per acre and if you can net $400.00 per acre, thats a 5% return which is better than a lot of stocks or any banks. But its not getting rich.

    Even though grain prices are almost as high as they have ever been so are input costs of chemicals, fertilizer, fuel and seed. Government subsidized crop insurance has probably been one of the biggest reasons many farms have managed to survive and make money in some of the most unforgiving years and weather conditions experienced in the last 6 years.

    Nevertheless, even with more modern equipment, you still have to have the knowledge how to run it, maintain it and clean it. You can always find work that needs to be done on a farm even though its not as hands on as it used to be. As far as livestock farming or tobacco farming, that is still some labor intensive work. I cannot speak to fruits, nuts, or produce farming as I have never worked in that area.

    The thing about farmers is that you have to know a little something about most everything in order to survive and succeed. How many people's gross annual earnings can be wiped out with one storm, with an extended drought, with a wet spring, and who have no control over the price of the commodity that they sell? Thats why farming and farmers has always been romanticized, because a farmer is forced to survive and succeed typically against overwhelming odds. Most farmers I know, including myself, are thankful to God when the weather is good, or when a hail storm or strong winds miss him and his neighbors. We are thankful when there is no early frost, and when we get rain during pollination. God relies farmers and farmers rely on God. Pretty good partnership, if you ask me.

    I think Paul Harvey's "So God made a Farmer" is still relevant and on point even in modern agriculture.
     
  13. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Lets not forget it takes farmers to make farmers daughters ; )
     
  14. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Boy the stupidity flies free on this thread. It starts from the very first post by the OP. To lump all farmers in one pile is pure and simple stupidity. Then again, Muggs is getting good at stupid.
     
  15. JDEERE

    JDEERE TS Member

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    Lets just import all are food! I think I would trust all the American hating countries first. Not much different than being in the Middle East subsidizing big oil, not to mention all the people on welfare. Your right the American farmer is evil.
     
  16. Holeinmypattern

    Holeinmypattern TS Member

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    Hey Im a big corporate farmer! My dad and I incorporated our farm 8 years ago to save money on taxes. I guess even though Im the 6th generation here and farm quite a bit of ground, im an evil lazy bum. Some of you need to find something else to bitch about. So, is is 7.5s or 8s better?
     
  17. Tim Earney

    Tim Earney Member

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    Every real farmer that I have ever known is a hard working, honorable man and deserves our support. The people like Ted Turner who pocket the vast majority of federal subsidies are mostly thieves who make big contibutions to less than honorable politicians. Even worse than the subsidies are things like the ethanol mandates. Not only has it greatly increased the cost of all food products as well as fuel,the production of it consumes more BTUs than it creates and reduces fuel mileage at the same time. Only government can be that stupid.
     
  18. Brady509

    Brady509 Well-Known Member

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    Where do you guys find libs so stupid. In my town of 900 people if it wasn't for the "subsidies" which by the way go full circle, this town wouldn't be here anymore. The money we recieve is not free 9 times out of ten the money is used to better the environment. It costs a fortune. We dryland farm strictly wheat. With a yearly average of 30 bushels to the acre. Guess what I farm on a operating line. Several folks don't understand the magnitude of living on a pray for rain. My question is this. If farming is easy money and ya cant loose. Why isn't everyone looking to either buy ground or take a loan and by some equipment to take over a lease. I am so frustrated with ignorance and a pure lack of knowledge. I can only pray some will realize that farming is a lifestyle the you do because you enjoy it. Here, where we live, you won't get rich, but you will make a living and hopefully leave my kids with more then I was left with.
     
  19. WesleyB

    WesleyB Well-Known Member

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    Amen !!!!
     
  20. noknock1

    noknock1 Active Member

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    Excellent post by luvs2shoot!
     
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