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can I use brass inserts in buttstock?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by bevolt, Jan 4, 2017.

  1. bevolt

    bevolt Member

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    I have stripped screw hole in my AL391 buttstock. Can I replace the wood screws with threaded brass inserts and machine screws or will that setup wiggle loose too easily? Why didn't the manufacturer use inserts?
     
  2. Claypoppy

    Claypoppy Well-Known Member

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    Brass wood "serts" as I have heard them called work great! I had the same issue on my 391 and installed a pair. Now uses machine screws as you said.

    The reason the manufacturer doesn't do it is simple...it costs more!
     
  3. leftex

    leftex Active Member

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    Be sure to get the ones you install with an allen wrench instead of a screwdriver.
     
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  4. noatrophy

    noatrophy Member

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    Yes, the inserts installed with an allen wrench, I believe, are a part of a kit; the CSP Pad Popper available from Midway. The inserts are steel, not brass. Brass would strip too easily. They are easy to install; follow the directions supplied. The main thing you have to watch is that you have to drill the holes to install the inserts exactly in the right place in the stock. Otherwise, your pad won't line up exactly with your butt stock. You think, oh, well, the drilled holes will be in the same place as the wood screws went; well that is correct, but you gotta be sure your drill won't drift a bit while you're drilling. That is what can mess you up on your alignment.
     
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  5. Don Rackley

    Don Rackley Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Ace hardware store sells a steel insert that you drill a hole in the wood and then insert the steel insert into it. Use button head socket cap screws. They are really good and inexpensive. Get 8-32 size so you use a 3/32"" allen wrench to install and remove your pad
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2017
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  6. Ed Y

    Ed Y TS Supporters TS Supporters

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    I used to use the steel ones but went to the brass when I ran into some of the steel bolts rusting into the steel inserts and became impossible to remove. I now use the brass, but install them upside down. If I have to remove them I use an easyout and replace it. They're a lot cheaper. I buy them 1000 at a time and use them, not only for recoil pads but also for pad adjusters and recoil reduction devices. With them I use 10-24 stainless steel phillips flat head bolts.

    Ed Yanchok
    .
     
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  7. DuckNut

    DuckNut Well-Known Member

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    You can fill the hole with epoxy and insert the screw, clean up the overflow. Then after it sets up remove the screw and mount the pad.
     
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  8. Big Az Al

    Big Az Al Well-Known Member

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    What duck said

    AS LONG AS you use a release agent! A paste wax for cars has done really well all my life!
     
  9. bevolt

    bevolt Member

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    Thanks for all the input guys. I think I am going with the epoxy solution because I can't find a steel insert at my hardware store and I don't have a drill press to get the insert in straight. I can always drill it out later and install inserts if the epoxy doesn't work out.

    epoxyworks.com says to use pam spray on the screw,

    "Pam® Cooking Spray is a quick and convenient adhesion preventer. Simply place the fastener on a paper towel and spray the threads, butter the threads with a bit of thickened epoxy so air isn’t trapped, push the fastener into the oversized, partially filled hole and let the epoxy cure. Back it out after the epoxy hardens and now you’ve cast threads in the epoxy."

    What do you guys think of that?
     
  10. flashmax

    flashmax Well-Known Member

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  11. dgh

    dgh Well-Known Member

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    YES you can use inserts,

    As said it eliminates a step and a part during manufacturing,

    DGH
     
  12. Hauxfan

    Hauxfan Well-Known Member

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    A real easy low cost fix.

    Put a wooden match or two in the hole. Break them off even with the hole, put your screw in and tighten.

    I've used this on a lot of wood products where the hole has either stripped out or gotten larger.

    Works for me!

    Hauxfan!
     
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  13. mkstephen

    mkstephen Active Member

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    GUN NUT II ADJUSTABLE STOCK ANCHOR' | Brownells
     
  14. bevolt

    bevolt Member

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    The epoxy worked great guys! pam spray worked fine to keep it from sticking to the screw or pad. Thanks for all the tips!
     
  15. stnlss99

    stnlss99 TS Member

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    Good to hear you got it fixed.
     
  16. RichTozer

    RichTozer Member

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    Would think an insert solution would not have been hard and far more durable than epoxy.
     
  17. SCO/C

    SCO/C Active Member

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    I've used the match/wood stick to fill the hole on a few stocks, easy fix.
    Pad on the stock is nothing we remove and reinstall every month or every year, don't worry too much about how durable the hole is.
     
  18. h-n-d

    h-n-d Member

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    Drill out the holes and use epoxy with the screws inserted through the pad into the holes, use release agent on the bottom of the pad and screws,this allows for perfect fit of the pad and it can be removed if needed