1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Can i still teach my Son to shoot with Aspergers ?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by 682 Adam, Dec 8, 2011.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. 682 Adam

    682 Adam TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    71
    HI Guys,

    My Wife & I, were given the news a couple months back that our only boy Hunter has Aspergers, He is nearly 4.

    For those that dont know Asperger's is a form of Autism about half way along from Normal to Fully Autistic.

    I am a very keen trap shooter (DTL, i live in Australia) and one of my most cherrished wishes was to pass on my passion for shooting to my son. Now, as anyone with a child with autism will know, shooting hasnt been on my priority list lately but i got to thinking about it today.

    Do any of you guys have sons or grandsons with Aspergers, if so do they shoot.
     
  2. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    6,246
    I have an employee whose son has aspergers. As the boy gets older he continues to function at levels far higher than ANYONE thought possible. Doctors have barely scratched the surface in understanding autism and aspergers. So love your son and don't let anyone's label prevent him from having a worthwile life and doing enjoyable things. GOD and YOU will determine whether your son can shoot. I'm betting the answer will be YES.

    -Gary
     
  3. GGib

    GGib TS Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    I have a 12 year old grandson with Aspergers. I don't believe there is an easy answer to this because there seems to be quite a range of function depending on the individual.

    I can only say that for my grandson I don't believe he would have any trouble taking up trap if he lived nearby. A few years ago I would have said no, but he seems to be progressing better and better the last few years. It's hard to imagine how much your son can improve over the years, and eventually get to shoot with you.

    Very best of luck
    George
     
  4. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    25,238
    Location:
    Deplorable Bitter Clinger in Liberal La La Land
    Only time will tell. Autism affects different people in different ways.
     
  5. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2009
    Messages:
    1,319
    It is impossible to know at this time. First it depends on his own interest. You can't push him into something like shooting. If he shows interest, then you'll have to judge if he can do it safely. If he can do it safely, he can shoot as well as any of us.

    By the way, this process is the same for any child.
     
  6. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    17,179
    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    With Gods help and your love many things can be accomplished. I have a family member who has severe Cerebral Palsy. The parents were told he would not be able to walk, talk and many other things other children can do. Now at 16yrs old he can walk quite well and has a great personality. Although his speech never developed he has his own way of spreading his love. I know thru my relatives the challenges you face on a daily basis. You have one of Gods special children. I believe they are put on Earth to spread love in a way others can not. I will pray that you have continued strength and hope your child is able to do many things.

    Matt
     
  7. bluedsteel

    bluedsteel Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2007
    Messages:
    525
    I have a friend who has a son with Asperger's. He struggled in school, mainly because his teachers and principals were ignorant on how to handle him. Finally, when he was about 14, my friend sent her son to a private school that specialized in educating children with Asperger's, etc. The school did wonders for him. He is now 18, and functions well as an adult. When I spent time with him after he returned from a semester at the new school, I couldn't believe he was the same person.

    Hopefully, your son's school district is knowledgeable about how to educate Asperger's children. If so, it is likely he eventually will be able to do most anything, including shooting. You will know when that time arrives.

    bluedsteel
     
  8. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    1,006
    Location:
    South Central Massachusetts
    Everything written above is true. My Aspergers son (now 24 y.o.) likes to shoot trap but he has a lot more to contend with than shooting higher scores. He'll always have difficulty in being understood by others, for whatever reason. We had to sacrifice a lot and fight like h*ll to get him the education he needed, and his mother (God bless her!) had the toughest job; she never gave up on him. Make sure your son's teachers know what Aspergers is, read his IEP and make sure they follow it. Never give up!

    LA in MA
     
  9. TEXASZEPHYR

    TEXASZEPHYR Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    841
    Location:
    TEXAS
    My step son now 35 has aspergers. He is living on his own with limited supervision. He's able to do for himself and get to where he wants to go. His current love is fishing and I will do all that I can to promote that. If he had an intrest in fire arms I would promote that also, but with close supervision. Each case is different, and you will have to just work with it on a day by day basis. God bless, just love and help with his development and take things as they come. Odds are that his IQ is normal but remember that he is more than likely really tunnelvisioned, so stick to one thing at a time depending on what his intrests are.

    Good luck

    Bob
     
  10. skeeter1956

    skeeter1956 Member

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Messages:
    97
    mate have a talk to graeme boyd from albury. he is to my opinion still one of the most knolegable coaches in australia and if anyone here knows he will be the one. cheers des
     
  11. BigBadBob

    BigBadBob TS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Messages:
    861
    There is a 15 year-old on a local youth shooting team that has Aspergers. I am not sure if there are mild cases or not. It would seem to me that it would be like you either have it or you don't. Anyway, you would notice something out of sorts with him anywhere but the trapline. When he is on the trapline it appears that he is so concentrated on the targets and breaking them that you see no indication of the disease. He recently started shooting bunker and does better than a lot of "normal" folks. I believe he is a AA shooter and finishes in the top 5 at almost every shoot we see him at. As soon as he is done shooting though, the symptoms return with a vengence.
     
  12. oleolliedawg

    oleolliedawg Banned User Banned TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    10,124
    Location:
    Northampton PA
    Wife's nephew has it. Shoots and enjoys Trap and sometimes pretty good. He's also highly intelligent. Of course, there are varying degrees of it and effects on functioning!!
     
  13. CalamitySJ

    CalamitySJ Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    650
    I coached an 18 year old high school senior last spring who has Asperger's. He drove himself to the club and enjoyed not only learning how to shoot but also figuring out angles and trajectory. While I don't think trap will be his lifelong sport it has nothing to do with his Asperger's, but who he is as a person--likes trap but doesn't love it.

    Your son is only four. Give him and yourself time, love, and every life opportunity you can including, if it's appropriate, the chance to share your sport. I wouldn't limit myself by anything heard from other's who say 'no' to new experiences--as a former teacher of children with autism I can tell you that any child's biggest 'handicap' is lack of opportunity to prove themselves.
     
  14. C Prince

    C Prince TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    351
    Sir,

    I have a 12yo son with autism. I have had him shooting my .22 for about a year now. It will take a lot of patience. He gets very distracted by stuff going on around him. I think if you take it slow I see no problems getting him shooting. Might not mean he is going to shoot DTL but the enjoyment of the two of you shooting is priceless. If you have any specific questions, PM me.

    Chad
     
  15. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Messages:
    6,349
    Location:
    S-E PA
    Hi,

    This is what I do professionally. You can visit my web site to see what we do. I see children all over the world, but my concentration is north of the equator.

    May I suggest you contact Chad Timmermans (e-mail: chadtimmermans@hotmail.com) who lives in Melbourne. He has been studying under me for the last several years and from a location point of view he will be your son's best bet. Please feel free to use my name - tell him you know me through shooting (I've had him out shooting and he's not a bad shot).

    Chad's parents studied under my father, and now he is studying under me. I include his web site (http://www.aiahp.org/index.htm).

    What I do is a sensory-perceptual approach based on the neurological aspects of a child's brain injury. This is a neurological approach not a psychological approach.

    UK web site (Robin Burn - a great resource for parents)

    http://www.theautismcentre.co.uk/

    Please feel free to be in touch with me directly (drop the X's from the e-mail address above). There is not an easy anser to your question, but you need more information to help you along the path your family is about to embark on.

    David Delacato
     
  16. gun fitter

    gun fitter TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    2,959
    The teaching is only half of it but the real challenge in my humble opinion may be imparting an interest in shooting. Aspergers is not debilitating to the point you can't teach them. I think the motivation will have to be there and the rest will follow.

    Good luck. If your in the states when your son is older drop me or HLDS a line I'm sure we could take him out shooting.
     
  17. Barry C. Roach

    Barry C. Roach Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    9,209
    Location:
    Scottsdale, AZ
    If he shows an aptitude for safety and can maintain it throughout the shooting session then it is possible. Tough call.
     
  18. 20yard

    20yard TS Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2008
    Messages:
    170
    I just went thru the NRA trap coaches class and a felloe student's son had Aspergers. He said the sport was very appealing because of the repetition, precision and concentration required. So you might find you'll have an enthusiastic companion. I enjoy shooting with my son very much or watching him shoot in SCTP.
     
  19. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,518
    As a retired school psychologist of 36 years in the field and a very mediocre trapshooter at best, I often, in jest, said that the best trapshooter that ever lived will be a highly intelligent and athletically gifted individual who loves the sport and presents with mild autism! Perfect tools for the trade, IMO!!

    More seriously, I do suspect that Asperger's is over-daignosed for a variety of reasons, the least of which is to allow the child or adult to receive help and funding. Secondly, I also believe that Asperger's syndrome covers a wider ground and is less specific as it becomes known for that aformentioned reason. I also believe that most of the youth I saw that are diagnosed as having Asperger's are, in reality, highly obcessive-compulsive to a degree that stands out to make said individuals appear to be "odd" and to be shunned by others who do not understand them.

    I am happy and fortunate to receive communication to this day via phone and sometimes over a cup of coffee with an "Aspy" individual I've known since he was age 8. He is now 31, and still is oddly ritualistic, very verbal, and largely in denial over having difficulties. I tell him that he behaves most like an individual with Asperger's syndrome.

    I also worked with another youth who was diagnosed as having Asperger's and he, that child was highly intelligent and agreed with said diagnosis. He had tremendous difficulties understanding social boundaries and cues; that caused him difficulties. However, he was capable and motivated and finished a four year college degree. He had tremendous difficulties with simple arithmetic and could not progress beyond pre-algebra. But he could describe, to a large degree, how he felt and where and how he felt his environment confused him. He told me that when he was told he was an Asperger's individual, he said "bingo" to his psyciatrist!

    One situation where I have seen Asperger's children/youth in relatively large numbers is on trains running locally and short runs on the weekends. Often, said youths will admit to loving systems with schedules and details and can and have told me a good deal about our local So-Cal Metro Link or Dayliner (My primary residence is in Los Angeles) when I took an infrequent jaunt for a weekend adventure. Others, like a couple of kids I knew locally, knew bus schedules and zip codes, phone numbers and the like from a very early age. Another knows tax code extremely well and works preparing taxes seasonally, but had difficulty progressing to handle highly complicated cases (all year) due to a variety of reasons, the most likely of which is lack of client faith in his skills due to his odd appearance and manners.

    So...I guess the ability to shoot will display itself one way or another as time progresses. I also think age 4 is a bit to young to make such a differential and specific diagnosis/hand out a label. Autism, yes, Asperger's which is so specific, my opinion is no.

    This is a fascinating thread and I hope to read others' input.

    Thanks,

    David
     
  20. 682 Adam

    682 Adam TS Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2008
    Messages:
    71
    WOW.....Thankyou for all the replays guys, I have t been able to log on since I posted this topic...kept coming up with "ERROR" I'm writing this from my IPhone which is doing my eyes the world of good!!

    We love our son with all our might and know that we have a tough road ahead, Hunter is an amazing boy,we have received a huge amount of information about Autism since his diagnosis but it is comforting to me to know there is such a great range of experience AND expertise within the trap shooting community that I'm sure I will call on if you guys don't mind...particularly both David's

    Once again My Wife, Lisa and I Thank everyone for there comments and look forward to reading any more that appear

    Lisa & Adam Flockhart
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Search tags for this page

aspergers trap shoot

,

can i teach a kid with autism how to shoot a gun