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Can I get some feedback on oil finishes on wood?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by xringjim, Jun 6, 2011.

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  1. xringjim

    xringjim TS Member

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    Just got some wood back that is oil finished. I've been told that the finish will take a bit of a more shine as it ages thus bringing out the grain of the wood more. Is this true? Also, if this doesn't happen do any of you have any advice on how best to refinish it to expose more grain? BTW, there is no checkering on the wood. Thanks, Jim
     
  2. xringjim

    xringjim TS Member

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    Joe, I was advised by the person who did the work to use 2500 grit paper. Linseed oil is what was used to finish the stock. I guess the best I can hope for is a really nice 'sheen' when done the way you advise. What I was hoping for was a finish very close to a lacquer type look. Will linseed get me there or should I try another oil?
     
  3. Mapper

    Mapper Member

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    Oil finish usually does not get as shiny as lacquer. Let it dry well and apply some paste furniture polish. It will look good, but still not be look a varnish.
     
  4. Shooting Sailor

    Shooting Sailor Well-Known Member

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    To polish the last five or ten coats of oil, use old panyhose. They take the imperfections out, without scoring the finish. When you have the finish you want, if it's still not glossy enough, use a wax for as many coats as you need to get the gloss.
     
  5. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    If you go to the local Bowling Pro shop and get some "Abralon" which was used in finishing fine furniture before someone started using it to resurface bowling balls ... Works great on wood and bowling balls and is a lot better than sand paper besides its made to be used wet ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  6. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    If you just build up wax to get the gloss you want, it will be gone on the very first usage.

    You should be able to use Tung Oil or Tru-Oil over the Linseed to make it more glossy. If all the pores are not filled in yet, using 1,000 grit sand paper will take forever. You might start with wet/dry 400 grit for the first coat or two. Then go to 800, 1,000 and up. I put the final coat on this one and polished with just a t-shirt:
    [​IMG]
     
  7. xringjim

    xringjim TS Member

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    Thanks fellas I'll try the tru-oil ot Tung. Jim
     
  8. Rastoff

    Rastoff Active Member

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    Probably a good choice. Tru-Oil is thicker than Tung oil. It will take less coats if you take your time. I have about 12 applications of Tung on that stock.
     
  9. lostandout

    lostandout Member

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    i use minwax antque oil finish works great
     
  10. 682b

    682b Member

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    Just a word or two about tru oil It does a very prety job but is not very durable. I used a rubbing coumpound to compleatly remove the Tru oil finish off of my DIY Wenig stock. Don' get me wrong it gives a nice looking finish it just does not hold up.
     
  11. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    xringjim,

    Sounds like you have a proper English oil finish.

    DO NOT USE ANY OTHER OIL ON THE STOCK!!

    The finish should be boiled linseed, mixed with carnauba wax. There will be some thinner (typically terpentine) and probably some Japan Drier to speed setting.

    The finish should be hand rubbed (use your palm) - and can take many, many coats. It needs to dry between coats (as the number of coats goes up, the drying time extends). The more coats you use the shinier the finish will be. The carnauba wax fills in the voids to give a perfectly smooth suface, which will then allow the linseed oil to truly shine.

    As the finish is applied wax might build up in certain areas (typically in checkering - not an issue for you), and if it does you just apply a fresh coat of the oil, and work GENTLY with 0000 steel wool or an old tooth brush. Wipe clean and get back to it.

    The finish will wear faster than other ones, but you just do the cleaning and re-apply the oil as mentioned above. In the UK this is typically part of the yearly maintenance one does on a gun.

    If you have more questions, or need a source for the finish, let me know (drop the X's),

    David D
     
  12. luvtrapguns

    luvtrapguns Well-Known Member

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    I have a stock that was done by Umberger. It has as glossy a finsh as you could hope for. It is hand rubbed oil for the first few coats followed by a final coat sprayed on and left to dry. I do not know what brand/type oil he uses. Marc
     
  13. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    As HSLDS stated, the grain of the wood has to be completely filled to look good. He is right about the many, many coats required.


    "I've been told that the finish will take a bit of a more shine as it ages thus bringing out the grain of the wood more. Is this true?"

    You will need to keep adding linseed oil for the rest of your life.

    Tru-oil is not really an oil finish. Saying that Tru-oil is not durable because it will not hold up to rubbing compound is like saying a diamond is not durable because it will not hold up to a hammer.
     
  14. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    If you use Bee's wax it will build up and shine like nobodys business, you just have to keep putting on more coats until you get the amount of shine you are looking for ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
  15. HSLDS

    HSLDS Well-Known Member

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    WPT is correct about the bee's wax, but it is a soft wax. It's fast because it is soft - you really want a hard wax to fill the voids.

    Carnauba is the hardest natural wax - that's why it is used.

    The others mentioned are 'quick and dirty' methods to get a shine on the finish. Not necessarily a bad thing, but if you have an oil finish you really want to keep it that way. (IMHO)
     
  16. wrzone

    wrzone Member

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    Take it to your local collision repair shop and have them spray it with clear automotive paint very durable and looks great
     
  17. grunt

    grunt TS Supporters TS Supporters

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  18. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Clear coat is very tough stuff, good luck repairing dents and dings.
     
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