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Campfire recipes...

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by wolfram, Mar 4, 2011.

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  1. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    Barrel cooked Tri-Tip

    Get a clean 55 gallon drum free of penetrations other than the removable lid. Burn it out really well with a hot wood fire for at least 3 hours. Make sure all the interior and exterior paint is burned off. Wash everything down before you use it for cooking.

    Cut 3 pieces of 1/2" rebar to lay across the top of the barrel (about 2 foot lengths). Bend several S shaped hooks to hang the meat with. I use 1/4" copper rod for this.

    Build a hard wood fire in the barrel, I like oak or Mountain Mahogany but even regular charcoal will work. Let that burn down till its almost coals then hang the meat in the barrel and cover with the lid. The lid should be riding on top of the rebar such that there is a gap fro air to get in and keep the coals burning. (but not enough to support a flame) You can throw in some hickory chips if you like that flavor but it isn't really necessary as you will get a good flavor without it.

    Come back in about an hour and the roast will be done to perfection. It will appear to be underdone but if you have doubts cut into it or use a thermometer. This part is key, don't be tempted to mess around with the set up while cooking as you will probably get a fire going in the barrel when the lid is pulled and that might burn the food. you should just enjoy a beverage or two while you watch the smoke boil out of your cooker. You can cook up to 9 tri-tip at one time with this set up or just a single roast.

    Various rubs work well with this method, I like the Moore County rub as found in the JD cookbook. What ever you use, take it easy on the salt content as that tends to dry the meat out and make it tougher than it should be.

    This method also works really well with other large pieces of meat (ribs especially) and even whole chickens and small turkeys.
     
  2. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    IL(The gun friendly Southern Part)
    Nice 4ft long willow branch and whittle the end sharp. Take a large marshmellow and stick on the end of the stick and roast over the fire. Blow out the flame and pop it in your mouth. Not real healthy but sure is good. I couldn't resist it. {:0)

    Matt
     
  3. Hardage

    Hardage TS Member

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    Here is a recipe from the shore lunches served while fishing in Canada.

    2 to 3 pounds size B red potatos
    2 cans sliced mushrooms drained
    1 or 2 green bell peppers medium chop...amount to taste
    1 to 2 large white onion medium chop
    1 1/2 pounds bacon of choice chopped into about 1/2" pieces
    1 tablespoon paprika
    salt and pepper to taste
    1/3 cup canola oil or other vegetable oil

    rinse red potatos and cover with water in stockpot and bring to a boil for 5 minutes then drain and let cool or rinse under cool water until you can handle them.
    cube the now parboiled potatos into 1/2" cubes or so..does not have to be exact
    In a large skillet, cook up the bacon until just starting to brown.
    Add onions and peppers and cook until they start getting soft. 5 minutes?
    Add potatos and mushrooms and turn all ingredients frequently and cook until potatos are the consistency you like
    Add paprika for some nice color and then salt and pepper to taste.
    Takes about a 1/2 hour to make and can feed a lot of people. very filling!
    Goes GREAT with fried fish and of course is high fiber with NO fat :)
     
  4. recurvyarcher

    recurvyarcher Well-Known Member

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    Throw some oil in a skillet and heat. Add some cut up onions and potatoes and cook until potatoes are half-tender. Throw in some frozen peas, some cumin powder, a little coriander, and a little turmeric powder. When the potatoes are done, toss in some chopped Cilantro and some salt and cracked pepper to taste.
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Location:
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    Now i'm get'n REALLY hungry. You all know how to cook.....
     
  6. blkcloud

    blkcloud Active Member

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    Nov 22, 2009
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    I got a dutch oven from sanny this year.. and a dutch oven cookbook... now if i can only get the TIME.............
     
  7. Hardage

    Hardage TS Member

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    Congrats on the Dutch Oven. You will use the heck out of it once you get used to it. If it is made out of cast iron it will brown like no other! All the time cooking with them is spent up front in prep and browning of the meat. Then you can just put the whole thing in the oven and go reload while it does the work.

    When you have time, go to cooksillustrated.com and look around. It is a subscription site but pretty cheap and has many recipes using the dutch oven.
     
  8. capvan

    capvan Active Member

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    I've had a lot of success cooking with foil pouches thrown directly into the coals around the edge of the fire. Hamburg patty, cut up potatoes, chopped onion...wrap a couple of layers of foil around it all and put it in the fire for 20 minutes or so. That Bar-B-Que University guy (Raichlen?) has a lot of good ideas and some great cookbooks. He actually cooked some 2 inch thick t-bone steaks directly on the coals. No grill, nothing. Brushed the ash (and live coals) off of them and they really looked great. Now that is cave man cooking...

    cap
     
  9. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    Nov 4, 2007
    Messages:
    777
    Try to find a barrel that held cooking/soy bean oil. Just have to worry about getting all the paint residue out of it after doing the burn thing to get rid of the paint.

    Here is dry rub recipe from Emeril Lagasse's cook book called: Louisianna Real & Rustic. I make it now with about half the salt. Note I grind peppercorns and the oregano and thyme in a bullet grinder so I can use it out of an empty shaker spice bottle. I use it on eggs, chicken, beef pork and in marindes too. I buy the store brands of the spices even sometimes at Big Lots!

    8 tablespoons paprika
    3 tablespoons cayenne
    5 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper
    6 tablespoons garlic powder
    3 tablespoons onion powder
    6 tablespoons salt - I only use 3 now
    2 1/2 tablespoons dried oregano
    2 1/2 tablespoons dried thyme
    Combine in a blowl and blend well. Keeps in an airtight container for up to 3 months. With less salt the other flavors come out stronger. Enjoy Bill
     
  10. WesleyB

    WesleyB Well-Known Member

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    DROOLING on my keyboard
     
  11. Haskins Bill

    Haskins Bill TS Member

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    I do mine on the gas grill with indirect heat. I light one side of the burner and under the other end I place a throw away shallow aluminun pan to catch the dripings. I place the meat or the beer can chicken on that end. Depending on the thickness of the meat i leave it there for an hour or so turning a few times then hit it with the barbecue sauce ove the flames. You can also do the indirect heat thing on a charcoal grill too. Here is my barbecue sauce receipe:
    1. 1/2 cup dark brown sugar 3. 2 cups tomato sauce #. 1/4 cup cider vinegar 4. 2 tbsp prepared yellow mustard 5. 1 tsp cayenne pepper 6. 1 tsp ground black pepper 7. 2 tbsp Worcestershire sauce 8. 1/4 tsp ground paprika 9. 1 tsp minced garlic 10. 1/2 yellow/strong onio finely chopped. I run the onio through the bullet grinder to really mince it. Simmer over low heat for 10 minutes, use immediately or store in a jar in frig for up to two weks. i suppose if you were making a big batch yoiu could cold pack it in pint mason jars per he instructions for canning. Bill
    PS this recepe is from all places, the George Foreman lean mean Grilling machine cookbook!!!
     
  12. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    RPeerless, The beauty of barrel cooking is that it doesn't dry the meat out. This is because the heat source is saturated with water and CO2/CO from the suppressed fire and it doesn't evaporate much moisture from the meat.

    You do have a legitimate concearn over getting the right (safe) barrel to start with. I buy food grade barrels from the local farm supply store. Normally these are barrels that were used for food products like juice concentrates. For sure you want to avoid barrels that were used for industrial chemicals.

    A side benefit of the cooking barrel is that it doubles as a safe campfire containment for after dinner enjoyment. Just remember, the bottom of the barrel grets very hot so don't set it up on grass or anything else that might burn - includes asphalt.
     
  13. cubancigar2000

    cubancigar2000 Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Idaho
    Dutch Ovens are won derful but the enameled ones are even better for all indoor cooking - We use the heck out of ours
     
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