1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

Calculating shot distance

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by dhwbailey, Feb 1, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. dhwbailey

    dhwbailey Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    294
    We have a bit of a shot fall problem which we believe we can solve by building a fence. The problem we have is knowing how high to build the fence.
    The distance from shooting position to the fence line is 235 yards. According to Journee's formula, 7.5 goes 209 yards at a 30 degree angle.
    How do we calculate how high a fence needs to be to ensure that all shot stays on our property?
     
  2. Neil Winston

    Neil Winston Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    7,860
    dhw, Ed Lowry's program "Shotgun Ballistics for Windows" says that a handicap-speed seven-and-a-half will go about 700 feet and land at an angle of 72 degrees, which means it's dropping close to straight down and that reduces the height of the wall you need. It is launched, by the way, not at 30 but 24 degrees to get maximum range.

    However, if some jerk substitutes sixes to win an "Annie" you'll find your wall 100 feet to close, and the neighbors' cars sporting the new "ball-peen look" which is so popular now in areas with high rates of carjacking.

    Neil
     
  3. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,364
    Location:
    Prairie State
    Starting with the assumption that you're throwing legal targets with a rise of 18' out at 31 yards and the shooter is a standard male shouldering a firearm at 5'... the rise over the run is 13' over 93' or less than 10 degrees max.

    There is no way a 7-1/2 is going to meet the max of 627' with that trajectory. A #6 isn't going any farther either and since both would be well at the end of their flight path...you'll end up getting by with a standard height fence.

    Think I'm crazy - take a group of guys and stand 'em out on the fence line 20 feet apart and have a couple fellows shoot some handicap loads at some pre-determined trajectories. If your targets (members) are a bit squimish, they can hold an umbrella infront of their faces for protection, but I'll bet you the shot never comes close.

    Once you are certain about the shotfall maximums, have your shooters start walking forward of the 16 yard line in pre-determined increments (25 feet) and experiment again - you'll be surprised how short shot falls.

    We did this very same experiment under controlled conditions with walkie talkies and while it may seem a bit crazy of a methodology, it puts everything into simple perspective.

    Jay Spitz
     
  4. Bob Hawkes

    Bob Hawkes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    3,916
    Jay Spitz is right on. We did this same method so many years ago that I can't remember the distance. You will find that shot does not travel as far as most tables give you. Jay's method is very simple, quick, and accurate. Change shot sizes if you need a "cushion" of comfort. Use factory shells. good luck, Bob H.
     
  5. spitter

    spitter Well-Known Member TS Supporters

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
    Messages:
    4,364
    Location:
    Prairie State
    Alder - thanks for the kind words.

    DHW, let me rephrase my comments earlier - the methodology may be a bit "unorthodox", but I can assure you whole heartedly that it is completely safe for your volunteers.

    We made sure our guys and gals wore eye protection, but it was never necessary - the shot never got close enough - we ran out of shells after advancing well past the trap house!

    Jay Spitz
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.