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Buying an expensive gun is NOT...

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by GrandpasArms, Aug 2, 2012.

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  1. GrandpasArms

    GrandpasArms Member

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    Buying a high quality gun is NOT an expense. It is an investment that will rarely be worth less tomorrow than it is today.

    Added August 8, 2012: Maybe I'm more a collector than an investor. In any case, my guns are not an expense. Same applies to a reloader - IF I had a reloader.

    Larry
  2. David McMillen

    David McMillen Member

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    I consider it renting until you're done with it.
  3. Big Jack

    Big Jack Active Member

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    Kept new in the box, YES, possibly..after shooters make all the alteration they want, questionable. Buy your gun with the intentions of keeping it till death, let your kids fight over it. If your buying it for resale profit, think what your doing when you consider porting, overboring, changing barrels, cutting stocks, and any other change you should consider needed. It's a tool, use it!

    Big Jack
  4. Twinbirds

    Twinbirds TS Member

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    It is good to have positive affirmations. Before I bought my first K80 they were appreciating faster that my savIngs.
  5. wolfram

    wolfram Well-Known Member

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    I can't seem to sell any firearms. I have done a couple of trades in the past but I always regretted it. Guess I like the hardware more that the greenbacks. My deffinition of value is how much fun do you get out of an item. Dollars are a poor unit of measure for this.
  6. headhunter

    headhunter Member

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    Buy right and sell right, and you don't have too many problems. Like money in the Bank. with internet sales so easy it's somewhat liquid. In the old days you would put a gun in a shop to sell and you wouldn't get the audience you have with the internet. ( that's what I tell my wife anyhow..)
  7. Tron

    Tron Well-Known Member

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    The key is knowing what you're looking at.
  8. mallard2

    mallard2 Member

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    I've shot a K-80 for 20 years and its worth more than I paid for it.

    It is not true that you have to keep them NIB. Just buy quality guns.


    Also, not like rent, because you are not losing money every month.


    Buy quality not gimmicks or fads and you will be fine. Go ahead and use them.

    You will still make money if they are cared for properly during use.
  9. OldGoat

    OldGoat Active Member

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    A good friend has a great rationale: he re-invests his $$ from his 401(k) - or IRA - into his 401(g)...g = guns. How can you argue with this? The guns are "things" which have some intrinsic value - and if you buy right, you don't lose if you gotta sell even if you break even. Best Regards, Ed
  10. Limpy100

    Limpy100 Member

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    If you can buy right then the price of the gun must have gone down.Not many go up in price and if you think you can use a gun and sell it at a profet you better think again.
  11. 90Tshooter

    90Tshooter Member

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    I learned years ago to buy good guns. If you buy them new and keep them long enough you can get your money out of them. As far as my kids getting them when I'm gone I have a theory on that. It goes like this, "If I live right my kids will inherit guns that are old, worn out, and shot out".

    Joe
  12. Steve W

    Steve W Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't buy any guns that I hesitate to shoot, if I don't feel comfortable shooting it, that means I can't afford it.
  13. CalvinMD

    CalvinMD Well-Known Member

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    Buying any gun expensive, mid-priced or cheap isn't worth what I paid (at least to me) If I cant win with it when I do my part...many folks I've shot with over the years gauge a guns value by how long I shoot it...if its up for sale in a month or less they run like he!!
  14. Brian in Oregon

    Brian in Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I don't buy guns for an investment. I buy them because I like them and I like to shoot them.
  15. bill kindred

    bill kindred Active Member

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    Brian nailed it.
    A dollar would buy three pounds of ground beef or five loaves of sliced bread when I went out on my own in 1965. Now bread is $2.50 a loaf, and a pound of lean ground beef is $4.00. My unfiltered Pall Malls that cost $.26 then are now $6 here in Iowa, although I gave those up in '90.
    My point is representing values with today's dollar can be VERY misleading.
  16. BigSkiff

    BigSkiff Member

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    Guns do appreciate in value, but it's a long term proposition not a short term one. Generally speaking, guns you bought more than 30 years ago are worth more today used, than they cost new. In many cases, a lot more.

    I bought a dozen Winchester 1897 pump shotguns used, about 40 years ago. I paid in the neighborhood of $65 a piece for them. I sold them in the late 90's at $450 each. So guns can be a good investment.

    If you want to cover your costs on a high end trap shotgun, buy two of them. Use one of them and leave the other in the box and store it in a dry safe place. 25 -30 years from now you can sell the NIB shotgun at a price that will cover what you paid for both of them combined originally.

    If you are wanting a return on your money in the short term, then look to some other investment area, as guns take a while to mature as an investment.
  17. oz

    oz Active Member

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    a friend and I went to the winchester factory years ago and he had a custom M21 made in 20 gauge. cost him $5,000.... he kept it in the box for about 5 years and sold it for $10,000
  18. 1oldtimer

    1oldtimer TS Member

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    When you factor in inflation, you won't make money on a gun of any kind,unless you steal it. Gold & silver over the last 30 years are far better investments.
  19. Redcobra

    Redcobra Member

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    I just can't seem to let go of them.
    The exception being a few pistols I bough when I thought I liked pistols better than shotguns. Silly me!
  20. Catching Chrome

    Catching Chrome Member

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    Some guns can be investment if you know what you are looking at and know the value (meaning what someone will pay!) I think few new guns are good investments because the market is flooded with high quality guns. Buying a new kgun for retail is not an investment. Buying a nice used one for a good price is the way to go. My motto is that in buying a used gun, it has to be worth what I paid for it incase I don't like it. If I can make a few bucks down the road even better. I've never lost any money on good quality used brownings.
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