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Buying a car: part 2

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by sernv99, Jan 5, 2010.

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  1. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    question about car dealers:

    some dealers have their used cars lots set-up as a phyiscally seperate location, e.g. the used car lot is across the street from the main dealership building or just down the road a couple doors away. And this used car lot is staffed with salespeople only dealing with the used car inventory Other dealers have all of their inventory on one lot, used and new,and the salesman inside deal both in the new and used inventory.

    my experience with the first type of dealership, described above, is that they operate without a lot of oversight from the main building, away from the main dealership, and the salespeople are more or less, the bottom of the barrel type of folks. The "closer" is more or less a real agressive "bazaar" wheeler and dealer.

    My experience with the second type of dealership is that they present a more professional apperarance and the "closer" is more professional, does not give you this "bazaar" wheeling and dealing type of attitude.

    Has anyone had the same experience?

    I went to two dealers this past weekend, one of each kind as described above. I found that I was more comfortable with the dealer who had all of their inventory on one lot and where the salesman I dealt with, sold both the used and new invetory. The second dealership I went to had their used car invetory managed on a separate lot across the street and the salespeople were just casual dressed, holed up in one of those mobile home type of buildings. They were a bit too aggressive for my liking.I found this similar to another dealership I had dealt with a few years ago. Same set up, used car lot was away from the main building/new car lot and the salespeople were of the "bazaar" wheeler and dealer types.
     
  2. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    In short, a seperate location for the used car department keeps the plaid jacket clad Maniacs out of the new car show room, which should project a more civilized image.
     
  3. birdogs

    birdogs TS Member

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    Buying a new car is one of the worst experiences a person can have. In what other store can you point to an item which is for sale, ask a price and get a full blown song and dance?

    Question - "How much is that loaf of bread?"
    Ansqwer - "$2.99" That is commerce.

    Question - "How much is that car?"
    Answer - "I need some information first."
    or "I need to speak to the manager.'
    Or "Do you have a trade in?" That is not commerce. That is thinly disguised thievery!
     
  4. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    In general, there is a much higher profit margin in used cars compaired to new and that profit margin can GREATLY change depending on the location of that used car lot (rich or poor neighborhoods). The very old and the very young are the easiest targets for an oportunist used car saleman. Also, the less educated (where there are a lot of poor people) the higher the profit margin.
     
  5. comp 1

    comp 1 Well-Known Member

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    Having sold both new and used--I always made more on the used---but the dealership has to have a really good used car buyer who buys the dealerships' used cars at auction.
     
  6. Tron

    Tron Supporting Vendor Supporting Vendor

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    And to know what to dump at auction. Yikes. One must REALLY know what they are looking at when at auction or one will get severely burned.
     
  7. gdbabin

    gdbabin TS Member

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    1. Know what the margins are. It is very easy to find out invoice prices, wholesale prices, standard mark-ups, etc. these days.


    2. Have your financing arranged ahead of time independently.


    3. Use a lack of urgency to your advantage. Take your time.


    4. Tell them what you will pay based on accurate research on the market, the delta between invoice and sticker MSRP. Offer your low figure with a pre-decided, but closely held rigid upper limit that you are absolutely committed to. Watch out for tomfoolery with offers for "free" add-ons to get you at a higher price.


    5. If they balk at your best offer, leave your calling card, walk away and go somewhere else. It does not have to take hours to negociate on the lot--just leave with a confident smile and handshake.


    6. If you have all your ducks in line someone will meet YOUR terms. If nobody does, then either your data is incorrect, or you don't really want the vehicle you are considering.



    Guy Babin
     
  8. miketmx

    miketmx Well-Known Member

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    I prefer to buy a used car from a new car dealer with a reputation for service and repeat customer business. Usually this type of dealer will dump a trade-in vehicle that they think will not live up to their standards. I would rather pay extra for some type of dealer Used Car satisfaction guarantee. I get very nervous when talking to the strictly Used Car lot that may or may not stay in business.
     
  9. Big Heap

    Big Heap TS Member

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    I have a friend who is a Cadillac/Volvo dealer who spends dull time on vacations shopping for a new car. He knows every pitch ever used and enjoys hearing any variation.

    He hired his used car manager after hearing the guy's spiel.
     
  10. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Buying a new car can be less painless via a process I've used: 1. Find out dealer cost from the mfg. re. the vehicle you want. This information is available from, I believe, Edmunds. And available for a nominal sum at any big bookstore..e.g.,Dalton's, Barnes and Noble etc. 2. Call dealer(s) and ask for fleet manager. 3. Say you will come down and buy today if you can purchase the car, for say, no more than "$200.0 up" assuming the vehicle is average in popularity in sales at that time. Dogs are blown out for less, race horse and popular cars like, say, a ZR-1 'vette are usually marketed with an added "market adjustment" and dealers try to get more than retail. 4. If dealer says no, can't do, just call another dealer. Worked for me on a fairly popular truck three years ago. I actually got it at dealer cost, before load, because they crunched numbers incorrectly and they didn't care. They live and die on service, volume, repeat sales, and getting the "load" money back from GM every quarter. Things may have changed, but I doubt it.

    I continue to think of auto dealerships as having a legacy to the style of the old horse traders that "retired" around the turn of the century...ah, last century, come to think of it.

    Hope this helps; remember, let the phone do your walking and talk that you know what you want and the deal will take little of their time.

    Tron? 'preciate your opinion.

    (and after somewhat proofing this, isn't it ironic that the manager of high volume sales is called a "fleet manager"...I mean, I can think of another "fleet" product and the closely related word, "fleece"?)
     
  11. LUGNUTZ426

    LUGNUTZ426 TS Member

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    SHOP AROUND....BUT WAIT TILL THE LAST 2 DAYS OF THE MONTH TO BUY. NEW AND USED
    CAR DEALERS AND MANUFACTURERS HAVE BONUS PROGRAMS FOR SALESMAN, MANAGERS AND DEALERS BASED ON HITTING A VOLUME NUMBER. IF YOU FIND A SITUATION WHERE THEY NEED A FEW MORE SALES TO MAKE THE NUMBER....THEY GENERALLY GIVE AWAY THE STORE TO HIT THE BONUS OBJECTIVE. YOU CAN SAVE HUGE DOLLARS BEING IN THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME.
     
  12. E. Beaver

    E. Beaver Member

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    The easiest deal I ever did was back in 2004.

    My wife and I picked out a Honda Accord V6 by driving them at a local dealer.

    Went to Consumer Reports and got the lowdown on the actual cost etc.

    Emailed several local dealers, told them what we wanted, and that it would be a cash deal.

    No hassles, walked in, check out the car, and drove off.

    Got the car for less than Consumre Reports suggested and it has been running well ever since.

    Charlie
     
  13. Chango2

    Chango2 Active Member

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    Charlie: I got a good deal for you on a used BT-99 Plus trapgun. 34". Only shot once by some little old lady from Pasadena.

    David
     
  14. Bisi

    Bisi TS Member

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    One of the few good things about living in Indiana is one of the blue laws still on the books. It is against the law to sell a car, truck, on a Sunday. So the dealers are not open that day. That is the day to go car shopping, without a bunch of weasles following you around and trying to sell you something you don't want. "I don't have any F150s you described , but I can make you a good deal on this Firebird that will serve the same purpose".

    Anymore I only buy used, let somebody else take the depreciation. Well anyway the last truck I purchased I was quoted 3 prices. I saw the truck on the lot on a Sunday, called about it on Monday and was quoted a way high price. 2 weeks later truck is still on lot so I called again about truck and was given a price a couple thousand lower, few days later went to lot and salesman who meet me at door quoted price another thousand lower. 3 prices from 3 different sales price on same truck.

    Wanna have some fun? There is a Ford dealer locally who likes to use high pressure sales tactics. On a good rainy day I will drive my 96 F250 4x4 over there and turn in their drive. The sales weasles will start popping up out of their chairs, cubicles thinking I'm looking to trade for another high dollar truck. They will grab their jackets and umbrellas and start heading out towards me. I will drive to the most distance part of the lot snd park by the new trucks. Then watch in the mirror as they come a running, then when they get withing 15 feet take off. I had 3 of em coming toward one especially rainy, nasty day. LOL It is like minus 5 degrees out there now, think I'll drive over to the Ford dealer and see what is shaking.
     
  15. comp 1

    comp 1 Well-Known Member

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    Bisi, u r a car salesman's worst nightmare--u ought to hear what they say about u as ur driving away haha
     
  16. sernv99

    sernv99 Active Member

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    I'm reporting back on my experience so far:

    I went truck shopping yesterday,intent on buying a certified used Toyota truck with low mileage. I ended up with a new 2010 model Tacoma 4x4, Sport package.

    Reason why I didn't stick with buying a used certified is that the prices on the certified trucks with the options (Sport package) I wanted were hard to find and if I did find one with low mileage, it was priced not very far from what a new one would had cost me. In addition, I only wanted a certified truck that was originally bought locally, not from out of state. I have had two bad experiences with buying used cars that were originally bought from out of state and when cars change hands from different states, it is hard to track the car's history via carfax. Some states are more lax with their laws than others with regards to reporting a vehicle's history. Since I plan to keep my truck and run it into the ground, new car depreciation wasn't a factor for me. My last car I bought had 53k miles on it, back in April of 2007 and when I traded it in yesterday, it had 118000 miles. That's average of almost 22k miles per year I racked up on my last car and it is only getting worse....i plan to average about 25k miles this year. So I need all the miles I can get and I think with my driving, starting at "0" miles, a.k.a new car, would be the best choice.
     
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