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BURNING PLASTIC

Discussion in 'Off Topic Threads' started by scooterbum, Apr 18, 2011.

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  1. scooterbum

    scooterbum Active Member

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    Please be sure to advise your trap help that the burning of plastics is hazardous to everyone's health. The burning of plastics (hulls) releases toxins that are poisonous to the body, whether breathed or absorbed through the skin.
     
  2. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    BS!

    Burning plastic hulls is no worse than burning a candle! They are basically the same stuff.

    Shotgun hulls are made of polyethylene and a percentage of polypropylene ... both are higher forms of wax.
     
  3. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    I would not be so fast to disagree with longshooter!!! I've seen reports not to use plastics in the micowave as it causes cancer for a few years now. there are like 7 different numbers of plastics. You can see the numbers in the triangle for recycling on all plastics. They are coded for a reason, but I'm not sure which ones are the worst. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  4. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    Ahab,

    You are misinformed. You have never seen a plastic fire.

    Don Verna
     
  5. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Bisphenol A, or BPA is the potential cancer causing plastics. The numbers on the plastic bowls, cups, baby bottles etc. indicates what plastic you have. Inhaling any burning plastic fumes/smoke is a bad idea. As far as that goes, inhaling smoke from anything can be potentialy dangerous.

    The safe plastics for microwave cooking and baby bottles contain mostly polyethylene and polypropylene (#1, 2, or 5), which do not contain BPA.

    Avoid using containers labeled with a 3, 6, or 7 inside the recycle symbol for cooking or even drinking. Not all #7 contains BPA and its hard to tell which does or which doesn't.

    Most plastics that are BPA free, say that on its bottom or package it came in.

    My understanding is heat is what causes the BPA to be released. If shotgun hulls contain BPA, you are heating it everytime you shoot. If this is the case, everybody shooting plastic shotshells is at risk from releasing BPA right in your face. As far as i know, shotshells are not marked with a plastic ID symbol.

    This is the markings you are looking for......

    [​IMG]
     
  6. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    I often reheat coffee in my plastic travel mug by putting it in a 1200 watt microwave for 30 seconds. Probably not my brightest decision, but it says 5 on it so I guess it's not that bad. Anybody know otherwise?

    -Gary
     
  7. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    Gary--Yes, a #5 in the recycle triangle is safe to reheat your coffee in.
     
  8. BILL GRILL

    BILL GRILL Well-Known Member

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    And smoking cigarettes was safe at one time also?
     
  9. Ahab

    Ahab Well-Known Member

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    dvena ... sorry to pop your bubble!

    I graduated college as a Chemist and my first job was with a plastics company.

    I left there as an Engineer/Designer to work in the aerospace industry.
    I worked on the Minuteman Missile that moved to work on the Apollo Moonshot Project.
    I left the aerospace game to go back to the plastics industry, working a materials compounder. Left there to be a Lab Director for at a different company.
    Left that company to start a new company as Technical Director.

    Guess that I must know something about plastics?
     
  10. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    Thanks Matt. I hope you're right -- I do it about a dozen times a week and I don't usually have a glass mug handy to use for reheating.

    -Gary
     
  11. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    Those numbers are recycling code numbers.....they have nothing to do with whether they are safe to cook with.

    Anyone that says that breathing burning plastics is not harmful is brain dead. I don't care who you work for, saying that is just NUTS.
     
  12. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    221--While you are correct, they also indicate whether or not they contain BPA which is a known cancer causing chemical. Plastics that contain BPA are not safe to be used for food or drink when heated. An excellent source of BPA releasing heat is the Modern Dishwasher and microwaves.

    The numbers indicate the types of plastics. It indicates the plastics makeup and thus if its a plastic with the harmful BPA or not.

    I do however agree that inhaling smoke from anything is plain stupid. That includes cigs etc.

    Just say'n.................



    •No. 1: Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET, PETE)



    •No. 2: High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE)



    •No. 3: Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC, vinyl)



    •No. 4: Low-Density Polyethylene (LDPE)



    •No. 5: Polypropylene (PP)



    •No. 6: Polystyrene (PS)



    •No. 7: Other: when package is made with a resin other than the six listed above, or is made of more than one resin and used in a multi-layer combination
    Before a product made of plastic is allowed to hold any of your food, it needs to be tested for its intended purpose. For example, the plastic that is approved for use in your microwave has been approved for that purpose, while the plastic that carries your water was approved for that use. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) admits that something will always "leach out of the container and into the food," so they try to determine the amount that someone will ingest over a lifetime versus the levels of a given substance that are known to be toxic. Their goal is to make sure that during our lifetime the amount that we consume will not pose any risk to our health. But what if their estimate of how much we consume is incorrect? What if the product containing plastic is not used according to the directions? These questions could be lifesaving ones. The first step is to know what kind of plastic is in your cabinets.
     
  13. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    <EM>"While it’s true that many plastics are imprinted with a numeric code, this e-mail’s cancer warning misses the mark. Like all materials intended to come in contact with foods or beverages, the plastics that are used to make beverage bottles are subject to federal safety review and regulations. Such materials must meet stringent U.S. Food and Drug Administration safety standards before they can be marketed to consumers.

    So, what’s in a number? The numeric codes that you see on many plastic items are used to help sort post-consumer plastics for recycling purposes. Different types of plastics are sometimes referred to as “resins” and the numeric symbols are known as “Resin ID Codes.” Each number (1 through 6) signifies a specific type of plastic and usually appears inside a small triangle (often formed by three adjoining arrows) imprinted on the bottom of a plastic item. The number “7” is used to represent a group of other plastics or combinations of plastics. Resin ID codes are not intended to provide guidance on the safe or appropriate use of any plastic item and should not be used for this purpose."</EM>
     
  14. grntitan

    grntitan Well-Known Member

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    The #7 plastics are the ones that cannot be determined safe by its number. Some #7 plastics contain BPA and others do not. This is only with the #7 plastics. While i agree with the last statement of your post, the numbers can be used as a basic guidline of chemical makeup of plastics. You can at least determine the ones to steer clear of. Those would be the ones(3, 6 and sometimes 7) that are absolutely known to contain BPA.

    You certainly know how to produce a valid rebutle.

    For the most part, you are correct and i am wrong on totally relying on a recycling codes as a guage to determine safety. I usually shop for BPA Free marked plastic containers. That packaging marking would be the safest way of determining what you have.

    Going to bed now so i'm throwing in the towel. LOL


    [​IMG]
     
  15. Pull & Mark

    Pull & Mark Well-Known Member

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    Yes, The numbers are for recycling use, but they have to be hand sorted in way that makes it very costly. Because of this cost only about 30 percent of the plastic that you recycled gets used again as it was designed to. Most of it gets tossed out or sold to make plastic items. They are a combo plastic that was collected and sold to a manufactor for various uses. Like I saw plastic interlocking square tiles for use in a garage floor, to park your cars on in Costco for sale. They are starting to find uses for all this plastic now, but for the last dozen years way to much of it was tossed out. Break-em all. Jeff
     
  16. 221

    221 Banned User Banned TS Supporters

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    grntitan....good photo, I deserved it...LOL I kinda follow the Paul Harvey philosophy..."Then there's the rest of the story" .

    Decisions made today need to have both sides of the coin, understood.

    As we appear to agree that a 5 "might" be safe, there's no guarantee that it will be.

    More people should be like you, and acquire the knowledge to be able to judge whats good or bad.
     
  17. scooterbum

    scooterbum Active Member

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    Hey fellas,

    So much for it seeming likes it's just about recycling; and hey, there's even a #8 here!

    Reference from - http://coastalcare.org/2009/11/plastic-pollution/

    Alexander Parkes created the first man-made plastic and publicly demonstrated it at the 1862 Great International Exhibition in London. The material, called parkesine, was an organic material derived from cellulose that, once heated, could be molded and retained its shape when cooled.
    Many, but not all, plastic products have a number – the resin identification code – molded, formed or imprinted in or on the container, often on the bottom. This system of coding was developed in 1988 by the U.S.-based Society of the Plastics Industry to facilitate the recycling of post-consumer plastics. It is indeed, quite interesting to go through the fine lines.

    1. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET or PETE) – Used in soft drink, juice, water, beer, mouthwash, peanut butter, salad dressing, detergent, and cleaner containers. Leaches antimony trioxide and (2ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP).



    2. DEHP is an endocrine disruptor that mimics the female hormone estrogen. It has been strongly linked to asthma and allergies in children. It may cause certain types of cancer and it has been linked to negative effects on the liver, kidney, spleen, bone formation, and body weight. In Europe, DEHP has been banned since 1999 from use in plastic toys for children under the age of three.



    3. High-density polyethylene (HDPE) – Used in opaque milk, water, and juice containers, bleach, detergent and shampoo bottles, garbage bags, yogurt and margarine tubs, and cereal box liners. Considered a safer plastic. Research on risks associated with this type of plastic is ongoing.



    4. Polyvinyl chloride (V or Vinyl or PVC) – Used in toys, clear food and non-food packaging (e.g., cling wrap), some squeeze bottles, shampoo bottles, cooking oil and peanut butter jars, detergent and window cleaner bottles, shower curtains, medical tubing, and numerous construction products (e.g., pipes, siding). PVC has been described as one of the most hazardous consumer products ever created. Leaches di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) or butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP), depending on which is used as the plasticizer or softener (usually DEHP). DEHP and BBzP are endocrine disruptors mimicking the female hormone estrogen; have been strongly linked to asthma and allergic symptoms in children; may cause certain types of cancer; and linked to negative effects on the liver, kidney, spleen, bone formation, and body weight. In Europe, DEHP, BBzP, and other dangerous phthalates have been banned from use in plastic toys for children under three since 1999. Not so elsewhere, including Canada and the United States.
    Dioxins are unintentionally, but unavoidably, produced during the manufacture of materials containing chlorine, including PVC and other chlorinated plastic feedstocks. Dioxin is a known human carcinogen and the most potent synthetic carcinogen ever tested in laboratory animals. A characterization by the National Institute of Standards and Technology of cancer causing potential evaluated dioxin as over 10,000 times more potent than the next highest chemical (diethanol amine), half a million times more than arsenic, and a million or more times greater than all others.



    5. Low-density polyethylene (LDPE) – Used in grocery store, dry cleaning, bread and frozen food bags, most plastic wraps, and squeezable bottles (honey, mustard). Considered a safer plastic. Research on risks associated with this type of plastic is ongoing.
    6. Polypropylene (PP) – Used in ketchup bottles, yogurt and margarine tubs, medicine and syrup bottles, straws, and Rubbermaid and other opaque plastic containers, including baby bottles. Considered a safer plastic. Research on risks associated with this type of plastic is ongoing.



    7. Polystyrene (PS) – Used in Styrofoam containers, egg cartons, disposable cups and bowls, take-out food containers, plastic cutlery, and compact disc cases. Leaches styrene, an endocrine disruptor mimicking the female hormone estrogen, and thus has the potential to cause reproductive and developmental problems. Long-term exposure by workers has shown brain and nervous system effects and adverse effects on red blood cells, liver, kidneys, and stomach in animal studies. Also present in secondhand cigarette smoke, off gassing of building materials, car exhaust, and possibly drinking water. Styrene migrates significantly from polystyrene containers into the container’s contents when oily foods are heated in such containers.



    8. Other – This is a catchall category that includes anything that does not come within the other six categories. As such, one must be careful in interpreting this category because it includes polycarbonate – a dangerous plastic – but it also includes the new, safer, biodegradable bio-based plastics made from renewable resources such as corn and potato starch and sugar cane. Polycarbonate is used in many plastic baby bottles, clear plastic sippy cups, sports water bottles, three and five gallon large water storage containers, metal food can liners, some juice and ketchup containers, compact discs, cell phones, computers. Polycarbonate leaches Bisphenol A (some effects described above) and numerous studies have indicated a wide array of possible adverse effects from low-level exposure to Bisphenol A: chromosome damage in female ovaries, decreased sperm production in males, early onset of puberty, various behavioral changes, altered immune function, and sex reversal in frogs.
     
  18. Recoil Sissy

    Recoil Sissy Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen:

    Since I have no expertise on the toxicity of plastics, I'm content to read other posters' contributions regarding the dangers or lack thereof. However, the original issue was hull burning.

    Whether plastic or paper, hulls are cross contaminated with lead, arsenic, and antimony from the shot. They get some extra toxic content from the lead styphanate used in primers.

    I suggest we all observe safe practices and avoid unnecessary contact with all of the above whether it is in the form of inhaled smoke or unwashed hands.

    sissy
     
  19. dverna

    dverna Active Member

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    http://journals.lww.com/joem/Citation/1976/09000/INTERNAL_MEDICINE___Plastic_Fires__Create_New.23.aspx

    Ahab,

    What say you to this?

    I have worked in the plastics industry for over 12 years and know a plastic fire is not a nice thing to be around.

    Again - have you ever seen plastic burn?

    Don Verna
     
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