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BT99 loose; Why?

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by JLW, May 24, 2008.

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  1. JLW

    JLW TS Member

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    With the receiver open, the bb'l is loose. Is the problem a worn hinge pin and hook?
    When closed, the bb'l is against the standing breech; no daylight shines through.

    Thanks, Jerald
     
  2. parrot man

    parrot man TS Member

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    HI There,
    I got the same problem with mine. I asked the same question here and got some answere. Even got a call from a nice gentleman in Canada.

    Anyway it seems your are right the hinge pin is loose and a few other things could be happenning. Call Arts guns or look him up on the web. He's a browning dealer and said he could fix the whole problem by rebuilding the guts.

    Cost you 300.00 plus shipping and handling.
    I think he is located in Montana but I could be wrong. I'm going to send him mine after the season is over.

    Hope this helps, Eric Vega
     
  3. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    The forearm is loose. Ed is going to peen the forearm lug. Wouldn't be my choice.
     
  4. bcnu

    bcnu Active Member

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    Skeets gun shop in Tahlequah Oklahoma used to fix that for about $95.00. Heck of a nice guy and a very good gunsmith. John
     
  5. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Ed, didn't mean to insult you but you said two minute fix and could even be done by Jerald whom I doubt you know. What else could be done that quickly and easily except peen the lug or the forearm iron? I'm not claiming to be an expert, you are.
     
  6. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Ed, I feel I helped the fella by warning him. I don't know you and some people would think nothing of using a hammer and punch.I don't have a prefered method but I'll take a guess, I'll have Jerald heat the lug and move it back. will only take two minutes.
     
  7. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Ed, No need to scan it for me I have the Browning Field Service Manual. They suggest staking the rear end of the slot in the forearm bracket. Peen away. Glad I could help with the advertisement.
     
  8. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    The Bt-99 loosens up just like most other break-open guns. The combination of wear to the forend lug and the forend iron's slot leads to the sloppines.

    These two spots will wear faster because of the smaller area of contact,versus the joint roll surface and joint roll pin.

    Welding the back of the forend lug is the correct way to tighten things up. Staking the forend lug or the forend iron itself is only a temporary fix, and an ugly one at that. The upset metal from the staking will only move right back after a thousand rounds and the forend will be loose again. Restaking enough times, and little bits of steel will eventually begin to break off. Now, a repair that would have cost $100, has risen to more, either by replacing the damaged lug, or welding up the forend iron's slot and recutting the square hole.

    PerazziBigBore--You use a Mig(wire welder)welder? I use a Tig.


    Doug Braker
     
  9. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    Doug, Thanks for the comments, you always offer good advice. I have no experience with this repair but I knew that peening and moving metal will damage and weaken it.
     
  10. Rem870TB

    Rem870TB Active Member

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    Interesting subject.

    I have shot for decades but never had a BT99 until 2007.

    I would be interested to know approx. how many rounds it takes to loosen one up to a point where repair is required.

    I am sure there are variables that influence the number of rounds they can go, such as, but not limited to;

    - is the gun closed or slammed shut

    - type of lubrication and frequency of use

    - cleaning or lack there of

    - heavy or light loads

    - letting the breech face get very dirty, causing the barrel to be "shimmed forward" against the phinge pin

    - some individual guns orginal factory fitting quality or heat treating
     
  11. rwm12

    rwm12 Member

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    A few years after the BT-99 came out I was told by a fellow shooter you could tighten the gun up with the screw on the end of the beavertail forearm. Has anyone heard of or tried this?
     
  12. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    rwm12,

    The screw in the front of the forend is just to keep the forend iron tight with the forend wood. What determines the guns "tightness or looseness" is how the forend iron gets pinched or wedged, between the back of the lug on the bbl and the radius of the receiver.

    Rem870TB,

    I don't think the shooting of light loads or heavy loods have much bearing on how fast a gun will loosen up, the amount of rounds surely does. As does how hard you close the gun.

    Lubrication is definitely a key. Two pieces of steel constantly rubbing on one another without lube will spell disaster quite quick.

    Probably the biggest culprit is the disassembly and reassembling of the gun. Each time the forend is removed and reinstalled, a little bit a material is pushed away on the bbl and in the slot on the forend iron. The more disassemblings, the more material pushed. Adding a small dab of grease to the lug can slow this down. This is why peening the forend iron or pinching the lug is only a temporary fix.

    I don't know what the steel composition the Brownings are made from, but it isn't quite that of some of the newer guns on the market that are made from heat-treated 4140. Their(Browning's) material is "kind of" soft in comparison.
    So this may lead to a lot of us seeing a BT or Citori loosen up at around 15-25 thousand rounds, instead of the 30 thousand plus on other makes. This doesn't make them a bad gun though. They ARE repairable, not disposable.

    These are just my observations and opinions from the past 25yrs or so. Some shooters may get much more life out of their gun, but I believe those shooters are more of an exception than the rule.

    As for the hinge pins wearing...I have not ever seen any factory assembled gun...any make or model...show signs of significant wear to the point that a gap develops at the breech face. There are guns out being shot right now, that over the years I have had to tighten up-2-3 times. This guns get shot a lot. None ever showed any wear to develop a breech face gap.

    A properly fitted bbl will have close to 100% contact with the receiver's standing breech. Also once this contact has been made, a small gab in the water-table is left for any movement the bbl wishes to make forward.

    JMHO,

    Doug Braker
     
  13. Rem870TB

    Rem870TB Active Member

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    GunDr

    Thanks, I have a couple thoughts on what you wrote;

    "Probably the biggest culprit is the disassembly and reassembling of the gun."

    This is one reason I don't transport my BT in a takedown case, I use a full length hard case most of the time. I got used to the full length case years ago and it is not an issue for me for most uses.

    My gun gets taken down for cleaning, rather than every trip to the club.

    "So this may lead to a lot of us seeing a BT or Citori loosen up at around 15-25 thousand rounds, instead of the 30 thousand plus on other makes."

    By loosen up, do you mean as in easier to open or loose enough to repair? If it is the latter, that seems like a low round count to need repair.
     
  14. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    Rem870,

    At approx the 20 thousand rds I mentioned above, you can begin to feel a little side wobble in the joint roll when the gun is half open.

    Doug
     
  15. oletymer

    oletymer Member

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    I guess I'm lucky. No side wobble with a little over 90,000 rounds in a 77 bt. I did get the kit from Midwest Gunworks a year ago because the lever was straight for a long time and is now back to the right. New springs etc were a plus as no parts had ever been replaced. I clean out the lubrication and relube after every shoot.
     
  16. JLW

    JLW TS Member

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    Ed- thanks for the help-Jerald
     
  17. Rem870TB

    Rem870TB Active Member

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    "At approx the 20 thousand rds I mentioned above, you can begin to feel a little side wobble in the joint roll when the gun is half open."

    That doesn't sound like a lot of rounds to get to that condition, to me. What I mean by that is if that happens, what is the incentive to buy a gun that loosens up like that in a couple seasons?

    At that point an 870 is just getting "slicked up" and 1100 broken in (even if it is prudent to replace the link every 5,000 to 10,000 rounds on the 1100, which is an enexpensive, owner replaced part).

    I like the BT99 I received last year as a company service award but I hope it goes longer than that before getting to the point where it is that loose.
     
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