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BT99 Ejector Issue

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by mike campbell, Jan 29, 2011.

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  1. mike campbell

    mike campbell Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2009
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    I'm looking for insight into my ejector problem. It's a 1970 gun with very little use. New to me and no history but the 400 shelss I've put thru it. First, it's intermitent. I can go 2 rds with flawless functioning, then have the ejector fail to kick 2 out of 5 times on each post. I don't really care whether it ejects or extracts, I stop the empty and pluck it anyway. But I don't like stopping to wonder why it didn't kick, fiddle around plucking the empty from the barely raised extractor and then suddenly realize, "Oh, is it my turn to shoot again?"

    The oddest thing is, while it might happen 10 times in one round of 25, it's practically impossible to make it happen by dry firing on an empty hull immediately after the round is finished. I guess I'm just fishing for a guess as to whether it just needs a thorough cleaning or should I suspect something broken?
     
  2. BigDave1200

    BigDave1200 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
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    I am interested in this answer also as mine does the same thing. It started about a month ago and it is not really a big problem as I reload but it makes it more difficult to pull the shells out with gloves on.

    Dave
     
  3. coveybuster

    coveybuster Member

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    Dec 15, 2009
    Messages:
    465
    Mike,

    My dad bought a "used" 1970 BT-99 in '71 and shot it until '79. It does the same thing as yours.

    I got it out a couple of years ago and it wouldn't kick the shells out. In the third round it started ejecting every third shell or so. Next time out it kicked every shell out. Next time it ejected about half the shells.

    Type of shells made no difference, steel base, brass base, Federal, Remington, Winchester, all were the same result.

    I packed it off to a well known gunsmith for cleaning, new springs, a new pad, etc. I told him about the ejector. He said he would adjust it.

    I got it back and I have only shot it one round, but it didn't eject 2 shells.

    I shoot a '69 BT that sat for 20 years in a closet and it has no ejection issues.
     
  4. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 1998
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    2,913
    Remove the ejector rod and put a very slight bend in it. Without the friction, it'll just float back and forth in the hole.

    The mainspring plunger assy pushes the ejector rod forward, as the gun cocks, the rod needs to remain in the forward position to trip the ejector hammer.

    Doug
     
  5. BigDave1200

    BigDave1200 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    233
    Does any one have a parts diagram for the BT-99? I want to be sure that I am focusing on the correct parts.

    Thanks Dave
     
  6. mike campbell

    mike campbell Active Member

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    The parts diagram, numbers, names are here....

    http://www.midwestgunworks.com/page/mgwi/ctgy/C-012-5

    I'm goiung to follow up on the suggestions to check out the trip rod, and I'll be back. Thanks for the replies so far.
     
  7. mike campbell

    mike campbell Active Member

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    OK, Doug,

    I've been studying my ejector. What you say about the ejector rod floating and needing to be forward all kind of makes sense. When I started the investigation, I was under the impression that it was the force of the moving trip rod hitting the ejector sear that somehow activated the ejector. Turns out it's only the protrusion that counts....the rod tip acts as a lever to move the sear and create, then releease the load on the ejector spring. I figured I'd have the gremlin if I could create a scenario where the gun has fired and, somehow, the ejector tip rod is not protruding from the frame enough to bear against the ejector sear as I open the gun. But I'm not having any luck creating that situation.

    Here the gun is cocked and the forearm removed. You can see the rod protrudes about 20 thou....not enough to trip the ejector and kick a live round. This amount of protrusion is very repeatable with my gun.



    mikecampbell_2009_19065.jpg


    If I pull the trigger, with the forearm on or off, the rod is pushed forward to protrude about 50 thou. If I reinstall the forearm and open the gun, this is enough to make the ejector kick.


    mikecampbell_2009_19066.jpg


    So, if the rod didn't make it out the full 50 thou when I fired the gun, I could see the ejector wouldn't eject. Or if the "floating rod" somehow floated back in a bit before I opened the gun, it wouldn't eject. Problem is, with gun fired and that rod sticking out .048 inches, it's no longer floating. Something in the action is pushing against it and I can't budge it no matter how hard I push on it.

    However, If I start with the gun cocked and 20 tou protrusion as in PIC 1, I can push the rod almost 1/4" back into the action.


    mikecampbell_2009_19067.jpg



    mikecampbell_2009_19068.jpg


    If I put the forearm back on with rod retracted like this and fire the gun, the ejector will kick. So whether I start with the normal condition of 20 thou protrusion or allow the rod to "float" backwards before firing, makes no difference.

    What I can't create is the condition where the gun has fired and the rod is not fully protruded and immovable. And I can't see how adding friction to tune the float would accomplish a fix.

    What am I missing?
     
  8. GunDr

    GunDr Well-Known Member

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    In the fired position, the mainspring plunger assy is applying pressure to the trip rod, this is why you cannot push it in. Once you begin to open the gun, the hammer is now recocking and the mainspring plunger is moving rearward, taking pressure off the trip rod.

    With the examples you have mention and shown, both are working as they should. To get to the spot you're looking for, is having the gun approx 1/3 open, or the hammer 1/3 of the way to being cocked. At this point, the plunger has moved back from the trip rod, and freed the trip rod. It's in this position the rod can float back.

    Here's a little trick you can try.....

    Be sure the gun is EMPTY. Point the gun at the floor and pull the trigger. Now open the gun and the ejector should trip. Then, with out firing the gun, open it about 1/3 of the way, then tap the muzzle on the carpet or rug. If the ejector trips, it's too loose.

    Next take the gun and point it up, fire it and open it. The ejector should trip. If it doesn't, the trip rod followed the mainspring plunger back into the gun. These are not the perfect tests, but if the rod is very free in the receiver, it will drop back.

    You can also pull the buttstsock and watch how the trip rod moves. It'll give you a better idea than just looking at the front tip.

    With the stock off, you can see the rear portion of the trip rod has an "S" bend. Sometimes after thousands of rounds, the rod will bend a little. This will prevent the rod from protruding as far as it possibly can.

    Slightly "straightening out" the "S" will make the rod longer. Then when the mainspring plunger pushes on it, it will poke the tip out further. With the rod a little longer, and the gun in the fired position, you should be able to push the trip rod forwad a wee bit until the soldered on disk stops it. You do not want the mainspring plunger bottoming out the disk into the receiver.

    The main thing is to be sure the rod has considerable resistance in the hole.

    Doug
     
  9. mike campbell

    mike campbell Active Member

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    Doug,

    thanks for the comments and explanations. It's reassuring to know nothing's broken, just not quite perfect. If I ever get it resolved to my satisfaction, I'll post again.
     
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