1. Attention: We have put together a thread with tips and a tutorial video to help with using the new software. Please take a moment to check out the thread here: Trapshooters.com Tutorial & Help Video.
    Dismiss Notice

***BT-99 Maintenance Book or Video***

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by IMGRV, Oct 26, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Hello - I am looking for detailed instructions on how to maintain my BT-99 - such as removing springs, firing pin, hammer etc. Pictures or video would be very helpful Thank you! Gino
     
  2. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,487
    Gino:

    Shot mine about 50,000 rds. and only took it apart (stock removed) once to replace the mainspring with a new one. They're pretty shocking on the inside as there is no finish on the internal parts. I put sone Lubiplate on the raw finished parts, replaced the mainspring and back in action. The firing pin removal is through the front monoblock with a special 3-pin tool. By the way, I've never heard of anyone breaking a firing pin in a BT-99; never heard of a hammer breaking either. Now ejector extension (#1 part break) will break every once in a while and occasionally an ejector and possible the trip rod end (the only weak points on these older BT-99's.). Different story for a BT-100 though as pertaining to firing pins. I never had a video or any other reference other than a parts diagram. Keep in mind you'll need to take off the trigger guard and recoil pad to start. Please note re-cocking manually the hammer with a new mainspring is challenging. BT100dc
     
  3. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Thanks kindly BT-100dc! I've actually done the firing pin and return spring with the 3-pin tool...no problem at all. I am just wondering how to do the mainspring as it is so long and strong compared to those in a Citori XT for example. I also may need to do the cocking lever spring, but that one might be easy enough. Can you tell me how you did the mainspring please? Did you remove the trigger plate to do it, and did you have any special tool to compress the spring? Thanks again in advance...Gino
     
  4. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,487
    Gino: I've done it once and it was about 20 years ago. Once I removed the stock, I knocked out the pin (concaved pin through the receiver) and what I recall is the unit came out. I remember that I released the hammer and removed the mainspring attempting to hold it without using a vise. I was able to re-cock it although I was sweating bullets (or should I say, shot?) and perhaps using the Lord's name in vain getting it cocked. I hope some others thread in to offer you more recent experience. I'm one of these "jack of all trades, master of none" people who will carefully disassemble a mechanical, electronic or electrical device and then try to put it back together. By the way, make certain you torque the main bolt just right with the stock perfectly in place. I had these thoughts of cracking it although it has never happened. I'm also very careful not to scratch the metal in any way. Good luck. BT100dc
     
  5. Tech Writer Jeff

    Tech Writer Jeff Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    153
    The BT-99 Field Service Manual is available for $4.99 at:

    http://www.gungarage.com/gunmanuals.htm

    Highly recommeded.
     
  6. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    BT-100dc: Thanks once again...funny, it sounds like we're similar regarding taking things apart. I've been doing that forever since I was a kid, and I win 99.9% of the time.
    Jeff - thanks for your suggestion. I'd love to have that manual but they will not send it to me here in Ontario Canada - one of the biggest issues we face here. Gino.
     
  7. BT-100dc

    BT-100dc Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,487
    Maybe some day I'll take all of the leftover parts from everything that I've taken apart and create something. Maybe it will be a time machine of some kind. Did inventors start this way? BT100dc
     
  8. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Perhaps. All I know is that with all the boxes of "things" I have accumulated over the decades from the 0.01% of the time I "lost" in my adventures, I can build something that should really get the neighbours talking. It might even include parts from my BT-99 too! Gino
     
  9. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Does anyone have something further to offer after BT-100dc's second post? I'd be much obliged...thank you. Gino
     
  10. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,932
    Location:
    beautiful northern michigan
    my maintainance schedule for my bt: shoot it shoot it shoot it, tighten forearm screws shoot it. repeat as needed Bill
     
  11. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    Bill - so far, that's exactly what I've been doing for six years. The forearm screws seem to loosen up on mine every so often as well. Thanks for sharing your experience...maybe that's what I'll do for a while longer. Gino
     
  12. slayer

    slayer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2006
    Messages:
    2,932
    Location:
    beautiful northern michigan
    Sorry Gino for being flip about it, but my shotgun mainainance isn't what it should be. use a good epoxy on the screws and the problem pretty much goes away. In the winter, i usually take the stock off and clean and oil everything visible. removing the stock on a bt is relatively simple and the new ones even come with the long allen tool to do so. you just have to break open the holes for the pad screws and then your on your way. Bill
     
  13. IMGRV

    IMGRV TS Member

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2012
    Messages:
    40
    No problem Bill - thanks for the tip! I am quite meticulous with cleaning my guns, but I also enjoy doing the relatively "simple" work on them myself, hence my original post. Gunsmiths are difficult to come by here in Ontario, but I definitely will turn to one for anything beyond pins and springs etc. Gino
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.