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BT-99 fore-end

Discussion in 'Uncategorized Threads' started by Billster, Nov 4, 2007.

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  1. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    'New' BT-99 (4000 rounds thru it since new in July). In the past two weeks the rear-most philips screw in the fore-end comes loose after 2 trap rounds, requiring snugging down to stop it from rattling. This has just started happening and the only thing that's changed up front is I've started using the access hole of the latch as my 'marker' for my left index finger in order to duplicate hold. Can't see how that would make any difference since i'm not applying pressure to the latch...just using it as a guide.

    Cure? Lock-tite? I'm afraid of softening the wood and threads and worry that continual tightening will stretch the threads/wood.

    bill
     
  2. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

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    I just went through this. Kept tightening the screws but after I while the rear screw sheared. Is there a gap between the forearm wood and metal? I sent mine back to Browning. They did a great job and didn't charge me but be prepared to be without your gun for a LONG time. They received mine on May 25th and I got it back on Sept. 7th. ( Most of the ATA season in New England.) Good Luck!
     
  3. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    Thanks, Ron.

    Yeah, there's a gap now. I CAN'T be without my gun for that long! Sweet Jesus! What did Browning do to it to fix it? I might run this by the stock fitter who builds custom stocks. Maybe he's got a solution.

    ....and winter league starts next Sunday!

    bill
     
  4. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

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    Billster,

    That gap is what is causing the problem. The screws are taking the impact and weren't meant to do that. Browning installed a new forearm that fit properly. (No GAP.) My Dad is a retired Gunsmith and was going to fit a piece to take out the gap or even use accu glass to fill the space. Both are not the best way to go. A properly fit forearm is the answer. BT 99's are great guns and I love mine but Browning service leaves a lot to be desired. As I said, I went all summer without mine.
    Ron
     
  5. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    Thanks again, Ron.
    Dat 'splains it. I needed something else to think about this week. Argh. And I just got the gun smokin'! I can't imagine shooting league with the old Mossie 500!

    B
     
  6. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    While typing the above reply, I'm thinking that the recoil is CAUSING the gap - causing the hardware to migrate back in the wooden forearm. The gap wasn't there before - i'm sure because i inspect as i clean after every use. Recoil is a rearward force and gripping the forearm puts the stress on the hardware/screws rearward and the wood 'gives'. Getting ready for work but I'll be tearing into the forearm tonight for sure...maybe find a more timely solution to sending it back. I don't mind spending some $$ at Jim the stockfitter if it means not losing use of the gun. I'll keep ya updated.

    b
     
  7. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    Oy. I'm thinking about this recoil/fore-end thing while getting ready for work....following the recoil 'trail' to the fore-end.

    Ron, I'll bet you've got the Gracoil LP on your gun. I do. Normally, methinks, the solid stock is supposed to take up the recoil as is your shoulder. Insert the recoil reduction system and now the fore-end is taking more of the recoil than it was intended to do - hence the wood stretches, causing the gap and eventually the screws shear. I'm thinking that BT owners without recoil reduction systems don't experience this fore-end problem since their stock takes the recoil as intended.

    Of course - if you don't have the GraCoil I'm all wet and need to get back in the shower. HA!

    I'm outta here. Get back to this tonight.

    b
     
  8. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    Oy. I'm thinking about this recoil/fore-end thing while getting ready for work....following the recoil 'trail' to the fore-end.

    Ron, I'll bet you've got the Gracoil LP on your gun. I do. Normally, methinks, the solid stock is supposed to take up the recoil as is your shoulder. Insert the recoil reduction system and now the fore-end is taking more of the recoil than it was intended to do - hence the wood stretches, causing the gap and eventually the screws shear. I'm thinking that BT owners without recoil reduction systems don't experience this fore-end problem since their stock takes the recoil as intended.

    Of course - if you don't have the GraCoil I'm all wet and need to get back in the shower. HA!

    I'm outta here. Get back to this tonight.

    b
     
  9. Ron Frazier

    Ron Frazier TS Member

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    Sorry Bill - No recoil reducer on my gun. With or without a reducer, a certain amount of recoil is absorbed by the forearm, just by the fact that you are holding on to it. If the forearm is not properly fit to begin with, the back and forth motion will cause the screws to loosen. The screws were meant to hold the wood and hardware together, not to absorb all of the recoil. I guess this is why the "wood to metal fit" has always been important. ( Aside from how good wood to metal fit looks so much better.) I used an old Stoeger SBT ( Gamba import) for ATA last summer while Browning had my BT99. Maybe some day Browning will realize that 3/4 months is not an acceptable turn around time for repairs! I brought this up on this site a while back and you wouldn't believe some of the horror stories- a year or so to get a gun repaired. Unfortunately, with a gun as new as yours, you will probably be better off having Browning make it right. Well off to work for me too!
     
  10. Billster

    Billster TS Member

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    Wiped out...long day at the pit. First thing tomorrow gonna pull the fore-end down and see just what's happening with this. Let the stock fitter/builder look and suggest, then make a decision.

    Really bummed out about this. My deep involvement now in this sport revolves around this gun. I SHOULD let Browning make it right, but if Jim has a solution I'll give it to him. He hand builds stocks for P and K guns. Will also look up Art's. Thanks for the suggestions. Thanks, Ron.

    Hitting the sack and I'll post update on this adventure.

    Bill
     
  11. vegas blaster

    vegas blaster TS Member

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    Nov 2, 2007
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    Gorrila glue to all the screws. no problem since and it fills in all the gaps.

    also be sure to check the stock screw... it gets loose about every 2000 rounds [no gorrila glue on that one].

    normal stuff with the BT-99. Jeff.
     
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