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BT-100 Trigger - PLASTIC? to replace = $104.46?

Discussion in 'Shooting Related Threads' started by Porcupine, Apr 17, 2010.

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  1. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    I was adjusting the location of the trigger on my BT-100 and I over-torqued the hex screw so that one of the 'flanges' (or whatever they're called) which secure the trigger broke off. Big mistake! First of all, I was very surprised to learn that Browning would put a plastic trigger on a BT-100 (or on any of their guns, for that matter). Well, we're not in Kansas, anymore, are we? Anyway, no big deal, right? I'll just buy a new one from Brownell's, right? Whoops! Part number 149-001-755 costs $104.46! Holy Rip-Off, Batman!

    Does anyone make a METAL replacement trigger for the BT-100? If I'm going to spend $104.46 plus S&H, it better last me a lifetime.

    LA in MA
     
  2. JACK

    JACK Well-Known Member Supporting Vendor

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    Who you callin batman, batman?
     
  3. phirel

    phirel TS Member

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    What is "pot metal" and how can it be identified? Is casting a part and then finishing it to dimensions always inferior to machining a part from a piece of flat steel?

    Porcupine- If you have a magnet handy you can tell if the trigger is plastic or steel.

    Pat Ireland
     
  4. GW22

    GW22 Active Member

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    Pat:

    Ed is on the right track -- "Pot Metal" is a colloquial term (no precise agreed-upon definition exists). It generally means a cheap cheesy metal.

    To answer your casting vs. machined-from-billet question the answer is NO -- neither is always inferior/superior. In some applications castings are superior and in some cases machining from wrought material is much better. There are castings, forgings and machined-from-billet parts on virtually every NASA space vehicle, and money is little object on those projects. There are other factors in the equation too. For example, machining certain shapes from wrought material like bar-stock results in high levels of residual stress. In certain specific cases heat-treatment, annealing, or cryo-treatment can resolve this problem. In other cases, castings may be better (castings can also be treated for hardness or stress-relief but they are also more likely to have porosity or inclusions and are less homogeneous -- both in mechanical properties and chemical properties).

    So your question is a very good one but it involves a very complex topic (materials science). That's why the hucksters are so succesful taking advantage of non-technical people $$$ (e.g. cryo-treating shotgun barrels).

    -Gary
     
  5. JerryP

    JerryP Active Member

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    It may be aluminum. My BT99 has an aluminum trigger.
     
  6. Porcupine

    Porcupine Active Member

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    South Central Massachusetts
    OK, now that I've taken the time to look at the trigger in the daylight, I can see that it is made from a cheap, easy-to-break (non-ferrous) metal, not plastic. But still, it shouldn't cost $104.46 for a new one.

    Time for another thread ..........

    LA in MA
     
  7. W.P.T.

    W.P.T. TS Member

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    Gun sales are dropping off, so they are trying to make it up on replacement parts ... WPT ... (YAC) ...
     
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